Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Awakens & Stretches

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 26 January 2016 - 4:14pm
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    Female figure stretching 'OTW Fannews: Fandom Awakens and Stretches

    • New York magazine took the opportunity to point out what the release of a new Star Wars film really means and included some early numbers from AO3. "[I]f you have even passing knowledge of the internet you won't be surprised to hear that hundreds of authors and illustrators in the fan-fiction community are already hard at work asking tough questions, like, 'Yo, what if these two (or three) characters kissed?' But in a Star Wars universe with at least four major new roles, the key question is: Who are we most excited to read about boning?"
    • Birth Movies Death was stuck on the idea that we're in a remix culture where official and unofficial fanworks all co-exist. "The most interesting fanfic is the kind where the fan takes a property they love and says 'I don’t see myself in here, so I’m putting myself in it.' I don’t mean that in general Mary Sue terms, but social progress terms - making characters queer, introducing characters of color, bringing in characters of other backgrounds...when Lucasfilm finally hires a filmmaker who isn’t just a white guy who grew up on Star Wars is when we’ll truly be entering a truly new phase of the saga."
    • The Mary Sue considered the relative importance of fanon vs. canon. "This all seems to be part of a larger conversation that I’ve seen happening lately, across fandoms in genre fiction everywhere: how much should canon matter? How much should creators’ opinions matter? Can our own passion for what we believe the canon should be overpower what the 'truth' of the source material is? And does the 'truth' really matter, at that point? Can fandom bring about Death of the Author so effectively that we make our own 'truth'? Even referring to the canon as 'truth' here makes me squirm, because it suggests that fan-fiction and fan-art and fan interpretations are somehow false and therefore wrong … which they may be, according to the source material, but they feel true and so valid and so life-affirming to fans."
    • Meanwhile Upvoted discussed the continuity of fandom across generations. "An immigrant from Vietnam, Greenleaf’s electrician dad developed a love for science-fiction in America watching TV shows like Star Trek and Johnny Quest. Then he saw Star Wars in the theaters when it came out in 1977. 'Definitely seeing Star Wars was a big thing for him, but I think he kept it to himself'" Now, however, it's all in the open. "'Once he saw me bringing a lot of costumes home and making them, he got interested...He’d ask me, ‘Can I try it on? Can I wear it?’ I’ve taken him to a lot of character events and introduced him to a lot of people, and he’s really gotten into it.'”

    Make sure fanworks and events surrounding Star Wars: The Force Awakens don't get forgotten! Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Coming Attractions

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 12 January 2016 - 5:18pm
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    A female figure dancing against a blue and pink sky 'OTW Fannews Coming Attractions'

    • Both the Wall Street Journal and The Global Times wrote about China's approach to fanworks and intellectual property. The Journal reported on Alibaba Pictures' plans to "no longer hire professional screenwriters. Instead it would gather material from online forums and fan fiction writers to compete with each other over screenwriting credit." Although screenwriters protested, others felt this was the wave of the future. "The rising demand for quality content with a built-in fanbase has driven up the price of such ideas in general, especially popular online fiction that is well-embraced by the country’s young generation."
    • The Times gave some background on the culture Alibaba planned to exploit. "An increasing number of Chinese IP owners are realizing the value of tongren authors - they are creative, enthusiastic and inexpensive. This year's hit TV series The Journey of Flower and The Legend of Langya were promoted using fan-made music. Journey to the West: Hero is Back produced official derivatives based on ideas submitted by fan designers. Many games, movies and TV series have also begun encouraging fans to create tongren works, even going so far as to hold competitions so they can discover talented authors and painters as well."
    • The Disruptive Competition Project hosted a post about what the Internet should look like in coming years. "Let’s start with Fandoms: they wouldn’t exist without platforms, and show why competing platforms give geeks what they want. Users naturally flock to the platform which best suits their particular fascination, and what the internet helps do is enable an level of intensity that simply couldn’t exist before." The EU wants to know more about users' needs. "They’ve launched a consultation — you have until the end of the year to respond — to 'better understand the social and economic role of platforms, market trends, the dynamics of platform-development and the various business models underpinning platforms.'”
    • Slate wrote about the stars of YouNow, dubbing it "the social network you’ve probably never heard of" and discussing the engagement of fans with its broadcasters. "'His supporters are on another level. I can’t even explain it'... Alex From Target, for instance, has seven times as many Twitter followers as Zach does. But when it comes to fan engagement—the number of RTs, likes, and comments the guys rack up, tweet for tweet—Zach’s metrics blow Alex out of the water. Zach’s fans are simply more obsessed. 'All these kids are getting crazy impressions,' Dooney says, and when they work together, 'it’s like the Power Rangers combining to become Megazord.'”

    Do you know about the next big thing in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Paying Tribute

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 29 December 2015 - 5:14pm
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    Two hands holding a heart with 'OTW Fannews Paying Tribute'

    • Canada's National Post reported on the 141st birthday of Lucy Maud Montgomery by citing not only the various incarnations and tributes to Anne of Green Gables but also its fanfiction. "Anne fans are pretty prolific in the fan fiction department, filling up the corners of the Internet with stories devoted to Anne’s experiences with postpartum depression or Anne and Gilbert’s romance (some are not as...chaste as the originals)."
    • Tech Times reported on a Hannibal anthology of fanworks. "So, why focus on fan fiction surrounding Hannibal? 'It was a combination of both my interest in starting a fandom press in general and my love and admiration for the show,' Fleck said. 'After doing Brooklyn last year, I knew I wanted to eventually attempt another fanbook, but I had planned on waiting at least another year before doing it due to the time commitment. Watching Season 3 of Hannibal unfold changed that plan — the finale was the nail in the coffin, I knew Hannibal was something really special and I wanted to do a Hannibal book.'"
    • WhoSay wrote about the short film "Fan Friction” produced for RocketJump: The Show. "The opportunity to have a story about two female characters and their friendship was really important, particularly because in geek and nerd culture there's a lot of hostility towards women historically. So it was an important and deliberate choice to make it two female characters. The goal with the short was to make it a love letter to female fans of nerdy stuff. Ideally that will make them feel included into a world where they are often excluded from."
    • Deadline wrote about a planned documentary focusing on Phantom of the Paradise fandom. "Phantom of Winnipeg will tell the story of that fan community and how it’s still going strong today. Like a concentrated and highly idiosyncratic Rocky Horror Picture Show, the film found in Winnipeg a devoted audience of, weirdly, 9 to 13-year-olds, who bought hundreds of tickets. Phantom actually outsold Jaws in its initial release, and local sales of the soundtrack helped the album go gold in Canada. The film also spawned 'Phantompalooza,' a local festival held biannually since 2004."

    What fandoms and parts of fan culture do you think should be remembered? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The Year in Fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 26 December 2015 - 4:46pm
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    Package wrapped in raffia reading 'OTW Fannews The Year in Fandom'

    • Hypable kicked off the end of year list tradition with an article on fandom things to be thankful for. "I knew that I wanted characters that I could relate to, but I had no idea the sort of self-assurance and confidence that female characters like Peggy Carter, Kimmy Schmidt, Jessica Jones, and Trish Walker could inspire. Watching these ladies on screen made me feel like I wasn’t alone. That the things I feel and the way I see the world isn’t just an isolated view. Peggy Carter’s 'I know my value' line makes me burst into tears whenever I hear her say it because it feels like she’s talking to me. These complex women believe in themselves and give me the confidence to do the same. I’m so grateful that there’s finally a surge of women like them in media because I need them. We all do."
    • Contributors to Star Wars.com discussed why they were grateful for the franchise. "More than anything, I’m thankful for the catharsis and moral center Star Wars has provided me, and the friends it has given me over the years. Without Star Wars, I’m not sure where I’d be and I can’t even imagine what my life would be like. Just about every person in my life that’s stuck around and been there for me I met because of Star Wars. I really don’t know who I’d be without it. It’s gotten me through all the toughest times and I know it’ll be there to do more of that in the future, too."
    • MTV.com suggested that Hamilton was revolutionizing fandom and mentioned some aspects to be thankful for. "More importantly, the cast reflects what America looks like today, bringing both diversity and women into the forefront. (Werk.) The story is every bit Eliza Hamilton’s as it is Alexander’s — some would say even more so." They also noted that many in the fandom had been unable to see the show but that "doesn’t make them any less of a fan. Like most fandoms, the Hamildom has spawned a giddy plethora of fan fic, fan art — mostly using the likeness of the Broadway cast, not the historical figures themselves — and even more impressively, it’s pretty drama-free."
    • One poster at Geek & Sundry wrote about their love for a Dr. Who fanfic and what the future might bring. "Star Hopping, as well as other great Whovian sagas, could be the beginnings of the next great Doctor Who showrunners and creative minds behind the scenes. But, even if they don’t take over the Whoniverse, they are still adding another interesting layer to the massive fandom."

    What are the fandom events that made you thankful in 2015? Keep fandom history alive in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Loving the Fangirl

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 3 December 2015 - 4:41pm
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    Banner by Elena Who of a heart monitor line in a heart shape reading 'Loving the Fangirl'

    • Mashable highlighted the emergence of more female fans as superheroes. The latest is Faith “Zephyr” Herbert from Valiant Comics’ Harbinger series. The “sci-fi loving, Firefly-quoting fangirl” now has a series of her own. "Part of what’s gained Faith attention in the comic-book community is that she doesn’t fit the mold of overly skinny or sexualized female superheroes. 'I've heard some very moving comments from comic fans who had never seen a hero who looked like them on the cover of a comic before the Faith covers were unveiled...So there is very much a demand for a book like this.'"
    • iDiva cited 10 Reasons Why you Should Date a Fangirl, which included their loyalty, understanding another's passions, always being able to entertain themselves, enjoying simple pleasures, and not being judgy of others.
    • Bustle piggybacked on an article in The Economist about the success of slash literature in China to discuss slash in more detail. "According to many estimates, the vast majority of yaoi consumers are young women — for instance, attendees at the 2003 Yaoi-Con in San Francisco were reported to be 80 percent female. When it comes to the gender breakdown of the folks who read and create slash, the vision is a bit less clear, as many authors remain anonymous and obscure their gender. But the overall picture seems to be that young women are the dominant consumers and producers of fanfic focusing on romantic relationships between men, whether it's slash, original fiction, or visual media."
    • Black Girl Nerds posted about loving fanfiction, and by extension, its most prolific creators. "I read your work on the bus, in between classes, during lunch breaks, before bed. Your writing has gotten me through boring lectures, eternities spent in waiting rooms, long car rides, and just plain bad days where all I wanted to do was curl up in bed and forget how absolutely terrible the world can be. It was your words that I first discovered before many of the WOC-authored published works I’d come to love. It was you who first helped me learn that genre fiction didn’t have to represent yet another place where Black people didn’t belong, that there could be a place on any planet, any world, any reality, for girls like me."

    Are there fangirls you think should be known about and remembered? Write about their work in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Life and Times

    Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 2 November 2015 - 4:59pm
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    Banner by Tea of footsteps and stars leading across a blue background with the words 'OTW Fannews Life and Times'

    • Latino USA aired a segment on diversity in geekdom which looked at video games, comic books, and cosplay. A Latino fan was interviewed about the introduction of more diverse comic book heroes, saying "It's intense to see all these races now, it's not just a white man's sport anymore." The interviewer noted that the con attendance was very diverse. "Not only are Latinos and other people of color everywhere but LGBTQ couples walk hand in hand, all ages are represented, and a few people with disabilities are pulling off some impressive costumes." (No transcript available)
    • The South China Morning Post reported on a Kpop fan who refused to learn English like her classmates because she wanted to learn Korean instead. "The girl has an encyclopedic knowledge of Korean pop stars, and her greatest interest was talking about South Korean dramas and music with her friends", the report quoted her mother as saying. "Her parents had banned her from using the internet and watching television at home so she caught up on her favourite shows when she stayed with her grandparents on the weekend."
    • The BBC reported on a special scene filmed for a Syrian fan who became a refugee. "Noujain Mustaffa is a disabled 16-year-old Syrian migrant...[who]...told journalists she had learnt English by watching the US soap opera, Days of Our Lives," though she missed her favorite character who had been killed. Comedian John Oliver arranged for a spoof scene in which Noujain's favourite character returned from the dead and gave her a shoutout by name.
    • RetailDive reported on the passing of an Apple fanboy who blogged about their stores. Gary Allen "shut down his blog in March after his diagnosis, choosing to spend more time with his family in his last days." However, "[w]riters at TechCrunch and The Washington Post hailed Allen’s attention to Apple’s stores, which he detailed at his blog that has now been discontinued, as an example of a singular and entertainingly articulated passion for the company’s choices in architecture and its courteous, well-trained store staff."

    What has marked your life in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Fixing Fails

    Pip Janssen on Tuesday, 27 October 2015 - 5:00pm
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    Black and white band aid with text saying fandom fixing fails

  • Black Girl Nerds hosted a discussion about race bending fanart, and its importance in increasing representation. "To behold an Aurora, with dark skin and a wide nose like mine, is an act of revolution. Her adornment of pigmented skin and black long locs is revolutionary. Her full lips signify the coveted trait possessed by numerous Black women like me. A brown Rapunzel, wrapped in a marigold sari is revolutionary. Her defiant brown skin distinctively pairs with a gold barrette in her long mane. These crucial depictions remind women and people of color of their beauty, existence and visibility."
  • The Toronto Star brought the Cosplay is not Consent discussion to a wider audience. "Similar signs have cropped up at conventions across North America, including New York Comic Con and Fan Expo Dallas. Organizers of Toronto’s expo, which wrapped up a four-day run at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on Sunday, say it’s a sign of the times, but not a political statement...Discussions about consent and victim-blaming are a movement outside the convention world, too. Ontario’s new sex-ed curriculum includes lessons on consent in the primary grades."
  • The Daily Dot profiled a new film about a male slash writer and discussed the negative reaction to it in many fanfic communities. "'[Y]our pitch looks like one more male indie auteur trying to make his name off of the backs of women,' wrote slasher and filmmaker Franzeska Dickson in response to the Kickstarter campaign...The cultural pattern of erasing women from their own stories and histories they created for themselves is a long one, and fandom is no exception: An infamous episode of Supernatural—one of the most female-dominated fandoms around—once portrayed a Supernatural fan convention within the show as almost entirely male-centric...Although slash writers focus primarily on male characters and many actively advocate for queer representation in media, queer men don't actually make up a large part of the slash community."
  • Metro's list of 21 things only fans would understand was lighthearted but didn't overlook problematic issues such as fandom battles and a lack of perspective. Also noticed was the lack of perspective from outside observers. "You do get judged for getting so into something. Football fans who cry over their team losing are ‘passionate’. Coronation Street fans who cry over their favourite character dying are ‘sad losers’. How does THAT work?"

What fails have you seen fandom fixing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Defying Expectations

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 10 September 2015 - 3:01pm
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    Banner by Elena of a globe surrounding by smiling female faces with the title 'OTW Fannews: Defying Expectations'

    • Fandoms have a variety of problematic behaviors, including how women's participation is welcomed. Sports marketer Amanda Curry complained about the nature of some efforts to reach out to female fans. "Despite their attempts to empower female fans, creating a program that perpetuates the stereotype that women know nothing about sports only further de-legitimizes the vast majority of us that do. Dumbing down sports for women not only makes us feel bad, but it allows others consistently treat us like we're dumb. This makes it harder to gain respect as a fan, and in my case, as a professional in the sports world...I am a female who works in the sports industry, and I know how it feels to have my opinion rejected just because I’m a woman."
    • CNN reported on the reaction of Star Wars fans to the bullying of a girl who loved displaying her fandom. "At this new school Layla started coming home more quiet and less of herself, and started asking not to wear her shirts or R2-D2 jacket" her mother said. "The girls in school were telling her she shouldn't like 'Star Wars' because it's for boys." However, after other fans began sending her gifts and messages of support, her enthusiasm returned. "Layla now feels loved and accepted in her stormtrooper uniform, and recently got a chance to meet one of her heroes, Weird Al Yankovic, who has two 'Star Wars' parodies in his repertoire. An added bonus...is that Layla enjoys surprising people who expect to see a boy behind the stormtrooper mask."
    • Henry Jenkins was recently honored by the Science Fiction Researchers Association and used the opportunity to discuss fandom's history when it comes to diversity. "Those of us who pioneered fandom studies too often bracketed race and class in order to focus on gender, sexuality, and generation. As we sought to validate forms of cultural production and experience that were meaningful to us, we neglected the fact that our own ranks were still too narrowly constituted and that there was more we should have done to validate forms of culture that were meaningful to a more diverse population. However much we might have sometimes felt like outcasts in our own lives, we were still in a privileged position to help inform what kinds of cultural production and reception mattered in an academic context."

    How have you seen fans defying expectations? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanworks of Note

    Pip Janssen on Thursday, 13 August 2015 - 4:16pm
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    Banner by Rachel of a generic newspaper with the OTW logo and the words ‘OTW Fannews’

    • An article at Huffington Post featured interpretations of Harry Potter characters that raceswapped their movie representations. "For many artists, Hermione's vague physical description has presented an opportunity to represent the character very differently. Instead of the 'bushy' hair JK Rowling often describes in the books, maybe she has kinky-curly hair. Instead of simply being tan, maybe she has dark brown skin. A black Hermione Granger isn't just a chance to see something new, but an opportunity to create a more complex reading of the book series, which has political themes that draw parallels between the Death Eaters and racist hate groups."
    • A post at io9 directed viewers to a tribute video of Hayao Miyazaki's work. "Vimeo user and animator Dono made this incredible video, which combines the beautiful piano work of Joe Hisaishi with extracted clips and characters from a plethora of Miyazaki films, from Spirited Away to My Neighbor Totoro to Porco Rosso, placing them into specially created 3D environments made by Dono."
    • Ventura County Reporter presented an outsider's view of cosplay at an Attack on Titan event. "One thing I realized at the premiere: Don’t mess with cosplayers or their parents. For instance, after a guard moved us media folks in with the fans, a mother and father advised their costumed children to push me out of the way. Then, a few seconds later, as the crowd swelled, the nearby blood-soaked cosplayer had a valiant defender complain to the crowd: 'My friend has social anxiety, like, really bad, and you need to give her some space.'...I guarantee that most of the fans didn’t even know the actors’ actual names. What was important was that the actors actually got to fully portray the characters that the fans had bonded with so closely."
    • Canada's The Globe and Mail discussed the future of Hannibal and its fanworks. "Whether or not another episode ever gets made, Hannibal is already a legacy show. Its disciples will still long be writing homoerotic fan fiction about the none-too-subtle love affair between Hannibal and Will, still be admiring the show’s layers of complexity, still be watching and rewatching until every facet is explored. With half a season left to securely enjoy, there’s still an opportunity to experience this legend while it lives, regardless of its fate."

    What are some of your favorite fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Getting Canon

    Katie on Sunday, 26 July 2015 - 4:01pm
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    OTW Fannews Getting Canon

    • Forbes hosted an article about cartoon fandom in Zambia and the difficulty in obtaining canon. "'It’s literally impossible to find anime DVDs in stores here,' said Banda. 'Also, the last anime I saw in a Zambian cinema was [Studio Ghibli film] Ponyo. So yeah, access is pretty rough.' Even today, DVDs and BluRay are Zambians’ only legal options, as 'streaming legally is pretty much out of the question,' Banda said, referring to Crunchyroll, Funimation, and other websites’ region locking for much of Africa. Since the local currency, the Zambian kwacha, is weak compared to the Euro, fans often obtain anime through piracy when that’s all they can afford."
    • Science Fiction.com wrote about a donation to the OTW's partner institution, the University of Iowa. "73-year-old Allen Lewis spent the last 20 years collecting more than 17,000 books. Many of them are in the science fiction and fantasy realm as Lewis sought to rekindle his childhood love for those genres. Lewis has been a sci-fi fan since he was 12...Many of Lewis’ books are first editions and first printings. His collection includes 30,000 signatures from authors, editors and artists." Don't forget that the Open Doors project helps fans arrange donations of fannish memorabilia to the Iowa collection, so contact them with questions about your own collection!
    • NBC Philadelphia was among those profiling the local furry community "Ward, who helps organize the local group, didn't identify as a Furry until 2008, after she graduated from Marietta College in Ohio. Like many local Furries, she found her way into fandom through its anthropomorphic artwork. 'It's kind of an all-or-nothing thing,' she said. 'You start going, they drag you to the convention, and that's it, you're done.' Around Pennsylvania, Furries congregate on one online forum, www.pa-furry.org, and a handful of Facebook and Twitter groups. Anywhere between a dozen and a hundred Furries, friends and family show up to the local events, which become more frequent in the summer."
    • The New York Times hosted a discussion about fannish nostalgia. "Alas, I will never be 9 years old in 1987 ever again, and though it’s fun to romanticize the past, I don’t want to mistake fondness for excellence...Much like my friendships with the other members of my Full House Club, whom I sporadically see in my Facebook feed with their own 9-year-olds, my fandom seems unsustainable now. Better, then, to let the children of today discover and obsess about their own TV shows. Don’t remake the sweet smarm of our youth. I’ll be fine without it. I can always read up on some Uncle Jesse and Uncle Joey fan-fic if ever I’m feeling sentimental."

    What stories about fans and canon have you been part of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.