News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrations in Focus

    Janet Vandenabeele on Saturday, 30 January 2016 - 6:28pm
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    Fireworks overlaid with the text OTW Fannews Celebrations in Focus

    • Fandom in 2015 was more "out" than ever before, with increasingly insightful takes on it that questioned common assumptions and sought to educate the public (and not just through academia.) Some of the developments had to do with changes in the media itself, and some due to an understanding of its rewards to both the media, as well as everyday efforts.
    • Hypable noted how fans were likely to spend the year-end holidays. "The fact is, everyone has their own traditions, and if you’re a part of a fandom, these traditions could (and probably do) relate to your passion. If you’re looking for ideas on how to add some flare to your celebrations this holiday, here are some ideas from six different fandoms!"
    • For some people, as in The Burlington County Times the real celebration was discovering a new fannishness. "[W]hen 'Star Wars Episode VII' was announced, my sister almost cried with immense anticipation. I, on the other hand, wasn’t exceptionally fazed, but in the spirit of sisterhood, I agreed to attend a showing two days after the movie’s release. I hadn’t minded the original six films that I had been emphatically encouraged to watch as a child, and I knew that Laura would appreciate someone to whom she could fangirl.
      I had no idea that I would leave that theater shaking and screaming with joy over what is now my favorite movie. Somehow, I had been involuntarily indoctrinated into the 'Star Wars' cult, and I regret nothing."
    • While some fannish meetings turned pretty permanent other fannish developments were personal revelations. "One of the awesome things about burlesque is that even when mainstream media usually only shows a limited ideal of women’s bodies, burlesque embraces all bodies. Big or small, tall or short, fit or not so fit. I’ve found the whole thing to be a very body positive experience. When I perform, I don’t care if people see my cellulite. And you know what? They don’t care either. They care that I’m performing as The Joker, or Edward Elric, or a post-apocalyptic road warrior. They care that I’m funny. They care that I’m showing them a great time. When everyone is having a great time being geeky, that’s all that really matters."

    What did you see as the major changes in how fandoms were represented in 2015? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Awakens & Stretches

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 26 January 2016 - 4:14pm
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    Female figure stretching 'OTW Fannews: Fandom Awakens and Stretches

    • New York magazine took the opportunity to point out what the release of a new Star Wars film really means and included some early numbers from AO3. "[I]f you have even passing knowledge of the internet you won't be surprised to hear that hundreds of authors and illustrators in the fan-fiction community are already hard at work asking tough questions, like, 'Yo, what if these two (or three) characters kissed?' But in a Star Wars universe with at least four major new roles, the key question is: Who are we most excited to read about boning?"
    • Birth Movies Death was stuck on the idea that we're in a remix culture where official and unofficial fanworks all co-exist. "The most interesting fanfic is the kind where the fan takes a property they love and says 'I don’t see myself in here, so I’m putting myself in it.' I don’t mean that in general Mary Sue terms, but social progress terms - making characters queer, introducing characters of color, bringing in characters of other backgrounds...when Lucasfilm finally hires a filmmaker who isn’t just a white guy who grew up on Star Wars is when we’ll truly be entering a truly new phase of the saga."
    • The Mary Sue considered the relative importance of fanon vs. canon. "This all seems to be part of a larger conversation that I’ve seen happening lately, across fandoms in genre fiction everywhere: how much should canon matter? How much should creators’ opinions matter? Can our own passion for what we believe the canon should be overpower what the 'truth' of the source material is? And does the 'truth' really matter, at that point? Can fandom bring about Death of the Author so effectively that we make our own 'truth'? Even referring to the canon as 'truth' here makes me squirm, because it suggests that fan-fiction and fan-art and fan interpretations are somehow false and therefore wrong … which they may be, according to the source material, but they feel true and so valid and so life-affirming to fans."
    • Meanwhile Upvoted discussed the continuity of fandom across generations. "An immigrant from Vietnam, Greenleaf’s electrician dad developed a love for science-fiction in America watching TV shows like Star Trek and Johnny Quest. Then he saw Star Wars in the theaters when it came out in 1977. 'Definitely seeing Star Wars was a big thing for him, but I think he kept it to himself'" Now, however, it's all in the open. "'Once he saw me bringing a lot of costumes home and making them, he got interested...He’d ask me, ‘Can I try it on? Can I wear it?’ I’ve taken him to a lot of character events and introduced him to a lot of people, and he’s really gotten into it.'”

    Make sure fanworks and events surrounding Star Wars: The Force Awakens don't get forgotten! Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Everybody Wants You

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 19 January 2016 - 4:41pm
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    Western 'Wanted' poster with OTW Fannews Everybody Wants You across it'

    • Tor.com discussed the appeal of fanwork exchanges and four factors that make them so special to participate in. "That’s the amazing thing about online fandom: It’s built on the notion of giving year-round: granting each other new stories in worlds in which the writers no longer roam; lending each other an ear when no one we know has read those books or watched those TV show; giving each other stories with the utter delight of not knowing what happens next."
    • Classicalite discussed wardrobe decisions made in The Leftovers, and its co-showrunner called for fanfic about the outfits. “You know if somebody wants to write fan fiction, tell me what happens when he puts on the G.R. outfit. Tell me what happens when he puts on the priest outfit. I think that is definitely implicit. And the other fun detail, of course, is that once he chooses the assassin's outfit and he gets it wet and he goes to look back in there's no going back. It wasn't like he could suddenly become a cop. That's gone. The choice is gone now.”
    • Conversely, Bustle highlighted Amy Schumer's self-insert RPF. "Do you love fanfiction? Who doesn’t? Well, my friend, does Gentlemen’s Quarterly ever have just the thing for you. When GQ's Men of the Year issue honoree/guest editor Amy Schumer was asked to invent fantasies about the other folks featured on the list, the award-winning comedian did not disappoint. Every last imaginary scenario concocted by the goddess among mortals is heartfelt. Creative. Moving. Inspired. Beautiful. Perfect."
    • Blogger Natalie Luhrs wrote about what makes something fanfic-y. "It is the idea that there is a locus of shame in pro fic that I find so intriguing and why I have different reasons for reading fan fic versus pro fic (I like both!). But every so often, there’s a piece of pro fic that has qualities that strike me as particularly fannish--they’re usually the books where, as I’m reading them, I’m thinking to myself, 'This is a terrible premise for a book and I can’t stop reading it because I am completely sucked into it.'"

    Which fanworks have you been wanting to read and view over and over? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Force

    Janita Burgess on Thursday, 14 January 2016 - 5:42pm
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    OTW Fannews banner by ElenaWho featuring a spaceship from Star Wars, a stormtrooper mask, and Darth Vader's mask

    • The release of the new Star Wars film prompted a renewed focus on fan activities in the news media, such as this speculation on the role of the prequels. "By the mid 2000s it was clear: George Lucas had betrayed us Star Wars fans. From his director chair he shot lifeless actors on lifeless green screens as he produced the terrible prequels and updates to the original films. In response, we the fans began to take ownership of Star Wars away from George Lucas. We became the moral owners and protectors of Star Wars. It was our galaxy now. We were Star Wars. He was not. The Star Wars prequels and special editions have caused a lot of debate. Yet, their role in how they have shaped a fan community is often overlooked. The prequels illustrate the fascinating ways fan culture survives and evolves."
    • Other outlets tried to identify where fandom lived, but the answer, as The Star presented, is everywhere. "In Malaysia, one group of fans have taken it a step further and turned into a band of lightsaber-wielding heroes who have spent the last few years entertaining local fans at various themed event. Meet the Force Arts Stunt Team (FAST), a group of lightsaber choreography performers based in the Klang Valley who don full Jedi and Sith costumes and act out self-choreographed fight scenes with life-sized stunt lightsabers in front of live audiences."
    • Fandom appeared in a number of unexpected places as well. Many outlets reported on a German's church outreach to fans. "A church in the German capital invited 'Star Wars' fans to attend a special service Sunday themed on the sci-fi blockbuster in an attempt to attract more young people into the pews. About 500 people heeded the call and attended the service, some carrying light saber props or wearing Darth Vader masks. It was more than twice as many as usually come to Zion Church on a Sunday." (For others, the surprise was inside the house all along.)
    • Unfortunately, some writers still can't get let go of the weird label for anything fannish. Fortunately, other sites and writers have a much better handle on how to present amazing work as just that. Plus, how about actually speaking to the fanworks creators? "[A]rtist Kelly Kerrigan explained how she was inspired to combine cuddly creatures with their 'Star Wars' comrades after her husband Paul's death in 2010. Paul, whose favorite film was Jimmy Stewart's 'Harvey,' had a soft spot for bunnies, even calling them his spirit animal. The 'Star Wars' characters act not only as effective foils to their cuddlier counterparts, they remind Kerrigan of bonding with her husband over their shared love of the trilogy in college."

    What stories about the new film's premiere do you think should be remembered? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Coming Attractions

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 12 January 2016 - 5:18pm
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    A female figure dancing against a blue and pink sky 'OTW Fannews Coming Attractions'

    • Both the Wall Street Journal and The Global Times wrote about China's approach to fanworks and intellectual property. The Journal reported on Alibaba Pictures' plans to "no longer hire professional screenwriters. Instead it would gather material from online forums and fan fiction writers to compete with each other over screenwriting credit." Although screenwriters protested, others felt this was the wave of the future. "The rising demand for quality content with a built-in fanbase has driven up the price of such ideas in general, especially popular online fiction that is well-embraced by the country’s young generation."
    • The Times gave some background on the culture Alibaba planned to exploit. "An increasing number of Chinese IP owners are realizing the value of tongren authors - they are creative, enthusiastic and inexpensive. This year's hit TV series The Journey of Flower and The Legend of Langya were promoted using fan-made music. Journey to the West: Hero is Back produced official derivatives based on ideas submitted by fan designers. Many games, movies and TV series have also begun encouraging fans to create tongren works, even going so far as to hold competitions so they can discover talented authors and painters as well."
    • The Disruptive Competition Project hosted a post about what the Internet should look like in coming years. "Let’s start with Fandoms: they wouldn’t exist without platforms, and show why competing platforms give geeks what they want. Users naturally flock to the platform which best suits their particular fascination, and what the internet helps do is enable an level of intensity that simply couldn’t exist before." The EU wants to know more about users' needs. "They’ve launched a consultation — you have until the end of the year to respond — to 'better understand the social and economic role of platforms, market trends, the dynamics of platform-development and the various business models underpinning platforms.'”
    • Slate wrote about the stars of YouNow, dubbing it "the social network you’ve probably never heard of" and discussing the engagement of fans with its broadcasters. "'His supporters are on another level. I can’t even explain it'... Alex From Target, for instance, has seven times as many Twitter followers as Zach does. But when it comes to fan engagement—the number of RTs, likes, and comments the guys rack up, tweet for tweet—Zach’s metrics blow Alex out of the water. Zach’s fans are simply more obsessed. 'All these kids are getting crazy impressions,' Dooney says, and when they work together, 'it’s like the Power Rangers combining to become Megazord.'”

    Do you know about the next big thing in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Self-Defining

    Kirsten Korona on Tuesday, 5 January 2016 - 5:54pm
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    • An article at The Mary Sue proposed talking to leaders in the fanfic and fanart worlds to get a better sense of what inspired them to create, how they feel about the higher profile, and how they see their work being devalued—not just in the media but from within the assumed safe space of fandom." The article discussed community, representation, bullying, and mocking of fanworks.
    • MTV.com promoted a video produced by Amplify with fangirls defining themselves by what they weren't, including taking a stand against RPS, and stalking celebrities. Amplify promotes music performers and is a Twitter-specific outlet that will utilize its auto play video. "As the ultimate live platform, we see Twitter as the ideal distribution network to reach a global audience instantly with the content they want to see and can’t get anywhere else. We want to create the MTV of 2015, reacting to news, music, technology, pop culture, and influencers within the hour.”
    • Following the trend of an increasing number of music and social media personalities, Officially K Music promoted VAV's selection of a fandom name after voting took place on their social media accounts. However originality is becoming a problem. "Since Vamps was already chosen as a fandom name for another band, they changed the “s” to a “z” and viola! Vampz was created!"
    • The New Statesman reminded people that fandoms aren't exclusively for any one gender. "[Y]ou might not have noticed that you were surrounded by female Star Wars fans all these years because you were the one who rendered them invisible. Women who like things such as Star Wars, or comics, or anything else that leads journalists to write those painful 'not just for boys anymore' trend stories, have had to take it from all sides. Enthusiasm for something seen as the province of men clashes with mainstream perceptions of femininity. Even women liking this stuff in the context of traditionally feminized fan spaces, like fanfiction, find themselves fending off assumptions from men and women alike, perhaps the accusation that they are sexualizing something too much, or they are placing too much weight on the emotional elements of a storyline. Basically, that they’re liking the thing the wrong way."

    Fanlore was created on the principle that having fans define themselves and include their many points of view was the best way to create a fandom resource. Help build it by starting an account and adding in your own experiences!

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Published Fanfiction

    Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 3 January 2016 - 4:26pm
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    A man hammers a chisel into a stone table 'OTW Fan News Published Fanfiction

    • The release of two books has continued to spread discussion about fanfiction. The Guardian wrote about Stephanie Meyers' genderswapped Twilight. "Life and Death is apparently a demonstration of how anyone, male or female, would react in the same way to a sexy, immortal love interest. But I'm not sure it exactly plays out like that. The idea of a moody teenage boy going gooey over a centuries-old, mysterious, super-strong woman who can fly feels revolutionary. Add in the fact that the book is from his point of view, allowing pages of moping about whether or not this powerful older woman actually likes him, and a pack of lady werewolves, and this is sounding like the book I’ve been waiting to read all my life."
    • Rainbow Rowell's Carry On has been featured in many an article that draws attention to its fanfic focus, though not necessarily in depth. The L.A. Times instead focused on the growth of diversity since Harry Potter debuted. The Guardian notices similar pushbacks but ties them closely to fanfic. "Carry On is in conversation with much of our popular culture... characters and plot points in Carry On can feel like direct rebuttals at times. Like the best fan fiction, this is one of the book’s chief pleasures: the way it simultaneously talks to these texts, pushes back at them and challenges them critically, while still letting the reader get lost in the world that Rowell has created."
    • Slate also focused on the positive influence of fanfic. "You’re able to see the characters in the moment, rather than burdened by years of history. You skip the world-building and get right to the drama and emotion. And you’re definitely able to just go with it when the story takes a turn for the slash. In Fangirl, at one point Cath gets in trouble in her creative writing class for turning in fan fiction. Her professor insists that it doesn’t count if she didn’t create the characters and the world in the first place. But Carry On makes a case for fan fiction’s literary legitimacy. It’s not easy to mimic, deconstruct, and remix the elements of a magical world in the way Rowell has here."
    • The Daily Dot most directly used the novel to discuss fanfiction at large. "Carry On isn't just fanfiction; rather, fanfiction itself is never just fanfiction. This is the thing that we who write fanfiction have so much trouble getting across to people unfamiliar with the medium. Carry On contain's Rowell's own original work, her own branching-off into something new--new characterizations, character dynamics, ways of thinking about the tropes that started with Rowling, and takes on magic and worldbuilding. It's absolutely fanfiction, but it's also something entirely her own. This is what we mean when we call fanfiction transformative work."

    What have you seen as the most direct influence of fanfiction on literature? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Paying Tribute

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 29 December 2015 - 5:14pm
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    Two hands holding a heart with 'OTW Fannews Paying Tribute'

    • Canada's National Post reported on the 141st birthday of Lucy Maud Montgomery by citing not only the various incarnations and tributes to Anne of Green Gables but also its fanfiction. "Anne fans are pretty prolific in the fan fiction department, filling up the corners of the Internet with stories devoted to Anne’s experiences with postpartum depression or Anne and Gilbert’s romance (some are not as...chaste as the originals)."
    • Tech Times reported on a Hannibal anthology of fanworks. "So, why focus on fan fiction surrounding Hannibal? 'It was a combination of both my interest in starting a fandom press in general and my love and admiration for the show,' Fleck said. 'After doing Brooklyn last year, I knew I wanted to eventually attempt another fanbook, but I had planned on waiting at least another year before doing it due to the time commitment. Watching Season 3 of Hannibal unfold changed that plan — the finale was the nail in the coffin, I knew Hannibal was something really special and I wanted to do a Hannibal book.'"
    • WhoSay wrote about the short film "Fan Friction” produced for RocketJump: The Show. "The opportunity to have a story about two female characters and their friendship was really important, particularly because in geek and nerd culture there's a lot of hostility towards women historically. So it was an important and deliberate choice to make it two female characters. The goal with the short was to make it a love letter to female fans of nerdy stuff. Ideally that will make them feel included into a world where they are often excluded from."
    • Deadline wrote about a planned documentary focusing on Phantom of the Paradise fandom. "Phantom of Winnipeg will tell the story of that fan community and how it’s still going strong today. Like a concentrated and highly idiosyncratic Rocky Horror Picture Show, the film found in Winnipeg a devoted audience of, weirdly, 9 to 13-year-olds, who bought hundreds of tickets. Phantom actually outsold Jaws in its initial release, and local sales of the soundtrack helped the album go gold in Canada. The film also spawned 'Phantompalooza,' a local festival held biannually since 2004."

    What fandoms and parts of fan culture do you think should be remembered? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The Year in Fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 26 December 2015 - 4:46pm
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    Package wrapped in raffia reading 'OTW Fannews The Year in Fandom'

    • Hypable kicked off the end of year list tradition with an article on fandom things to be thankful for. "I knew that I wanted characters that I could relate to, but I had no idea the sort of self-assurance and confidence that female characters like Peggy Carter, Kimmy Schmidt, Jessica Jones, and Trish Walker could inspire. Watching these ladies on screen made me feel like I wasn’t alone. That the things I feel and the way I see the world isn’t just an isolated view. Peggy Carter’s 'I know my value' line makes me burst into tears whenever I hear her say it because it feels like she’s talking to me. These complex women believe in themselves and give me the confidence to do the same. I’m so grateful that there’s finally a surge of women like them in media because I need them. We all do."
    • Contributors to Star Wars.com discussed why they were grateful for the franchise. "More than anything, I’m thankful for the catharsis and moral center Star Wars has provided me, and the friends it has given me over the years. Without Star Wars, I’m not sure where I’d be and I can’t even imagine what my life would be like. Just about every person in my life that’s stuck around and been there for me I met because of Star Wars. I really don’t know who I’d be without it. It’s gotten me through all the toughest times and I know it’ll be there to do more of that in the future, too."
    • MTV.com suggested that Hamilton was revolutionizing fandom and mentioned some aspects to be thankful for. "More importantly, the cast reflects what America looks like today, bringing both diversity and women into the forefront. (Werk.) The story is every bit Eliza Hamilton’s as it is Alexander’s — some would say even more so." They also noted that many in the fandom had been unable to see the show but that "doesn’t make them any less of a fan. Like most fandoms, the Hamildom has spawned a giddy plethora of fan fic, fan art — mostly using the likeness of the Broadway cast, not the historical figures themselves — and even more impressively, it’s pretty drama-free."
    • One poster at Geek & Sundry wrote about their love for a Dr. Who fanfic and what the future might bring. "Star Hopping, as well as other great Whovian sagas, could be the beginnings of the next great Doctor Who showrunners and creative minds behind the scenes. But, even if they don’t take over the Whoniverse, they are still adding another interesting layer to the massive fandom."

    What are the fandom events that made you thankful in 2015? Keep fandom history alive in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Crossing Boundaries

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 22 December 2015 - 3:52pm
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    Banner by Diane of the post title in a hazy mist

    • Hypable reported on how a The 100 fanfic went viral in non-fanfic communities. "It’s absolutely hilarious to see how non-fandom has responded to this fictional argument, and how people have even taken sides — but the fact that Clarke was immediately assumed to be a male does say a lot about our heteronormative society, doesn’t it?! Despite this somewhat depressing factor, The 100 fans are having a blast with this, and are fully embracing the ridiculousness of #ClarketheHusband. We’ve never been more in love with this fandom."
    • Hypable also reported on a less happy example of a fanwork crossover, the appearance of yet another practitioner of the fanworks ambush stunt. "The segment started out fine, with Corden showing off brilliant, iconic pieces of artwork. But then… well. They start mocking fan art from artists who might have had less practice, or are younger. And Corden, especially, finds it all hilarious. And, sure. It’s amusing. Until you realize that there are people out there who drew them — and that these works are reproduced without consent or warning. The context of these pieces is stripped back; the smug hosts reduce them to a mockery, the butt of a joke. And these creators could be watching this show, without expectation, only to be accosted by unwarranted abuse."
    • Of course, the print media is increasingly moving in on RPF fandoms' turf by creating their own fanfic, focusing on anyone from local figures to politicians to celebrities.
    • Huffington Post pointed out how fandom's use of social media had made their interaction with celebrity family members ever more likely. "But perhaps the best use of social media is the ability to know her son is safe wherever he might be in the world, thanks to the hundreds of thousands of fans almost 'stalking' their every move. 'If they’re flying, I’ll do a search for “5SOS airport” and I’ll see they’ve landed and I’ll know they are safe...I would do that when I was looking after them too on tour, if they’d gone out on a particular night and I wanted to know if they’d come home to the hotel -- it would be on Twitter -- it’s kind of like they’ve got lots of little mums out there checking up on them.'"

    What have been examples, for better or worse, that you've seen on fandom and fanworks crossing boundaries? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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