TWC’s Top 10

Partial view of the TWC word cloud

One of the OTW’s projects is Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC), an open-access academic journal dedicated to fandom and fandom studies.

But don’t think that just because it’s a peer-reviewed, scholarly quarterly with a bibliographic listing in the MLA bibliography of journals that the contents of TWC aren’t for fans like you to enjoy!  Check out this sampling, ranked by number of DOI resolutions:

1) “Why we should talk about commodifying fan work”, by Nele Noppe. How would legalizing fanwork influence the question: should fan work be free?

2) “Book Review: Boys’ love manga: Essays on the sexual ambiguity and cross-cultural fandom of the genre”by Nele Noppe. “The focus of the book remains squarely on the fans of boys’ love manga, which makes it relevant to anyone interested in fan studies.”

3) “Women, “Star Trek,” and the early development of fannish vidding”, by Francesca Coppa. This paper discusses how early female Star Trek fans structured the practices and aesthetics of vidding, in order to heal the wounds created by the displacement and fragmentation of women on television.

4) “‘The epic love story of Sam and Dean’: ‘Supernatural,’ queer readings, and the romance of incestuous fan fiction,” by Catherine Tosenberger. Tosenberger examines the literary, cultural, and folkloric discourses of incest and queerness as invoked by the show in order to argue that “Wincest” fan fiction is best understood not as a perverse, oppositional reading of a manly dudebro show, but as an expression of readings that are suggested and supported by the text itself.

5) “Endless loop: A brief history of chiptunes”, by Kevin Driscoll and Joshua Diaz. Driscoll and Diaz explore the confusion surrounding what chiptunes is, and how the production and performance of music connected to 80’s electronic video game soundtracks “tells an alternate narrative about the hardware, software, and social practices of personal computing in the 1980s and 1990s.”

6) “Stranger than fiction: Fan identity in cosplay”, by Nicolle Lamerichs. Lamerichs argues that “costuming is a form of fan appropriation that transforms, performs, and actualizes an existing story in close connection to the fan’s own identity,” and that “cosplay motivates fans to closely interpret existing texts, perform them, and extend them with their own narratives and ideas.”

7) “Repackaging fan culture”, by Suzanne Scott. Scott argues that “the strategic definition of fandom as a gift economy serves as a defensive front to impede encroaching industrial factions” like FanLib and Kindle Worlds, and examines “the Seinfeldian roots” of the social taboo of “regifting,” relative to fan culture.

8) “Thirty political video mashups made between World War II and 2005”, by Jonathan McIntosh. The creator of the famed Buffy vs. Edward remix vid explores subversive pre-YouTube remixes.

9) “Book review: Spreadable media: Creating value and meaning in a networked culture, by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green”, by Melissa A. Click. “Readers with stakes in the tug-of-war between fans and industry will likely enjoy, and be invigorated by, the authors’ arguments about spreadability.”

10) “The Web planet: How the changing Internet divided “Doctor Who” fan fiction writers”, by Leora Hadas. Hadas explores how evolving participatory culture clashed with traditional fandom modes and came to a head over one Whovian fanfic archive, using the conflict there to argue that “the cultural logics of fandom and of participatory culture might be more separate than they initially appear.”

And if you want to move beyond the Top 10 articles on TWC, here’s a word cloud of the most frequently used words taken from the titles of every article that TWC has published in its 6-year history.

Would you like to help us generate even more words? Head over to Fanhackers to see how you can celebrate acafandom, meta, and more with us—or check out the TWC Submissions Guidelines for submitting your research or essay to the journal!