OTW Fannews: Social Media for Fans

  • The Wall Street Journal wrote about different fandom activities on different social media platforms. “[T]he CW is trying just about everything in social media. Interestingly, once its fans tell the network which platform they want to use to interact with their favorite shows, the network leans in hard. ‘We attack all the social media,’ said Rick Haskins, the CW’s executive vice president of marketing and digital programs. ‘Very, very quickly, the consumer says ‘this is the social platform we like [this particular show] on.’ When we see upticks, that’s when we move in quickly.'”
  • At The Daily Dot, S.E. Smith pointed out that not all fandoms embrace social media. “It seems to run counterintuitive to the idea that tech determines the pulse of popular culture. The NCIS website is crude and clunky, the show’s Twitter is an anemic promotions vehicle, and the Internet doesn’t exactly come alive with fans livetweeting NCIS on Tuesday nights. The Internet isn’t interested in it for all the reasons that it appeals to vast numbers of viewers, illustrating that what the Internet wants from television is not necessarily what the Nielsen viewer wants.”
  • The Asahi Shimbun discussed the importance of the decision to go royalty-free with vocaloid Hatsune Miku. “Developer Crypton Future Media Inc. released guidelines that acknowledge the creation of fan fictions for noncommercial purposes. To encourage collaborations between users, the company also set up Piapro, a social networking website where fans can post their songs and illustrations. ‘It’s meant to make creative efforts widespread without making users feel intimidated,’ said Hiroyuki Ito, Crypton Future Media president.”
  • Wattpad continues to pursue amateur authors and to focus on readers. In a discussion with The International Business Times, the inline commenting feature is mentioned. “This adds another dimension to the social interactions on Wattpad. With Inline Commenting, readers can comment on specific words, sentences and paragraphs of a story…Not only does Inline Commenting provide valuable and in-context feedback to writers, but it creates a new social experience for readers. It’s almost like they’re reading alongside their friends and they can exclaim, commiserate, and react as the story unfolds.”

How have you seen companies developing content and features for fans? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

OTW Fannews: Awesome creations

  • Mother Jones wrote about Jennie Lamere, who recently won the “best in show” award at the national TVnext Hack event by helping fans avoid spoilers on Twitter. She did it by writing “Twivo, a new program that allows Twitter users to censor their feeds from mentioning a certain TV show (and its characters) for a set time period.” She was the only solo woman participating. “Hackathons (which have nothing to do with illegal hacking) bring together programmers, developers, and designers, who compete to code an innovative new program in a limited amount of time.” Lamere has already been approached by a company to market her creation. “She came up with the idea for Twivo the night before the competition, and it took her 10 hours and 150 lines of code to complete.”
  • Fan creativity isn’t just becoming a given, it’s beginning to be demanded as well. Kotaku posted about “Little Witch Academia…an animated 30-minute short released by Studio Trigger on YouTube” which was “produced as a part of the ‘Young Animator Training Project’.” Noting that anime fandom had successfully instigated a series from their response to an ad, writer Patricia Hernandez urged them to do the same with this project.
  • While non-scripted TV shows tend to lag in terms of fanwork creations, there’s at least one fan video out there, “Hold Up, Bro” that can make people take note that they exist. “Lisa Ferreira recreated last week’s episode in Legos, showing how three idols led to Phillip’s exit. It’s fantastic and kind of shocking that Legos are so effective at representing Survivor cast members and locations.” Ferreira then added ” a full-length song and musical number…written and performed by Lisa and her brother Matthew Willcott.”

What cool fanworks have you seen lately? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

OTW Fannews: Privacy and preservation

  • Salon warned consumers that entertainment driven by data gathering “won’t end well.” Author Andrew Leonard described how much Netflix knew about his viewing experience with a particular show: “I hit the pause button roughly one-third of the way through the first episode of ‘House of Cards,’…Netflix, by far the largest provider of commercial streaming video programming in the United States, registers hundreds of millions of such events…Netflix doesn’t know merely what we’re watching, but when, where and with what kind of device we’re watching. It keeps a record of every time we pause the action — or rewind, or fast-forward — and how many of us abandon a show entirely after watching for a few minutes…Netflix might not know exactly why I personally hit the pause button…but if enough people pause or rewind or fast-forward at the same place during the same show, the data crunchers can start to make some inferences.”
  • The government also wants to know what we’re doing with our devices. Discussing the release of Twitter’s transparency report, The Verge says “Governments seemed more interested in user data last year, making 1,858 information requests (by comparison, Google received a total of 21,389 requests from data just in the second half of 2012). There wasn’t a huge shift in any category in the second half of the year for Twitter except for government takedown requests, which rose from 6 to 42.” The majority of takedown requests came under the DMCA and “the company removed material from its network for about 45.3% of takedown notices.”
  • On the Media broadcast an interview focusing on new copyright enforcement in the U.S. “Starting in the next couple of months, five of the country’s largest Internet service providers, AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon will implement what is called the Copyright Alert System, known colloquially as ‘six strikes.’ In the works for over a year, the system is meant to create an escalating series of penalties for serial illegal downloaders.” The guest was Jill Lesser, executive director of the Center for Copyright Information, a collaboration between industry associations like the MPAA and RIAA and ISPs. (Transcript available)
  • The Digital Preservation Coalition published the report Intellectual Property Rights and Preservation [PDF 1187KB] by Andrew Charlesworth, focusing on the legal obstacles to preserving digital material. The document focuses on UK law only, but is valuable for its risk assessment and recommended actions, regardless of location.

What legal and technology stories have you been focused on? Write about those issues in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.