Spotlight on Legal Issues

Tumblr Post+ and You

We’ve been getting a lot of inquiries about tumblr’s recent announcement that it would be beta testing a feature it is calling “Post+,” which allows users to monetize posts by locking them to subscribers.

How does this interact with AO3 policies?

Don’t worry, nothing’s changing. As always, AO3 is dedicated to noncommercial fanworks, and has a policy against using the AO3 for commercial solicitation. So, linking to your blog or other social media from AO3 is fine. But linking to your Patreon, Ko-fi, Amazon sales page, or other commercial/fundraising site isn’t. Letting people know how to learn more about you is fine, but soliciting financial support isn’t. So how does this rule apply to tumblr? We know a lot of people link to their tumblr accounts from their AO3 profiles or works, and that’s fine! But linking specifically to subscriber-locked material on tumblr isn’t, and using AO3 to ask people to subscribe to a monetized tumblr account isn’t. And of course, AO3’s rules don’t govern what you do on other websites.

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This Week in Fandom banner by Olivia Riley

This Week in Fandom, Volume 120

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, thanks to everyone for the congratulations on AO3’s Hugo win. There’s been more squee than we can keep up with. If you’d like to see some of the press coverage about the award, check out the Press Room on our website.


One of the big stories this week is the news that Marvel and Sony have decided to no longer collaborate on Spider Man movies. The story was broken by Deadline in this article last week. It’s kind of a complicated situation (Jeff Goldblum is confused about it), but it seems to be mostly about money. Read More

This Week in Fandom, Volume 103

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, the the 2019 Oscar nominations have been announced. What are your predictions for who will win?


It’s been over a month since the Tumblr Purge, and the long-term effects are starting become apparent. The Mary Sue published an article examining the effects the purge has had on fandom specifically. The article states that there appears to have been a decrease in activity on the site.

What’s clear is that there’s been a fractious exit from Tumblr, with those who have left scattering to distant corners and no one clear alternate platform able to replace what Tumblr had been.

Tumblr isn’t totally dead, of course. Many people have remained, but from my perspective, there’s been a noticeable slowdown in activity.

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