Links roundup for 20 February 2012

Here’s a roundup of “fandom everywhere” stories that might be of interest to fans:

  • Mardi Gras in New Orleans now has an open-source side. “Bar2D2, as the robot is called, is the mascot of the Intergalactic Krewe of Chewbacchus, which runs a ragtag operation dedicated to all things science fiction. In two years, the group, which started as a drunken joke in a bar, has become the quickest-growing krewe in the city, and a center of the amateur costume culture in New Orleans.” Aside from giving people a chance to be creative, “Chewbacchus and krewes like it are a response to the exclusivity of the older groups. Chewbacchus does not have any waiting lists or recommendation requirements, and dues are only $42 (an arcane numerical reference to the novel “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”).” Rather than change old traditions, the krewe believes they are modernizing it. ““The old Mardi Gras krewes play off of Greek gods,” Mr. Powers said. “We believe sci-fi is the strongest mythology of our time.””
  • Star Wars fandom was also in focus at the Hollywood Theater in Pittsburgh. The Fandom Meant Us is “a romantic comedy about Star Wars fans’ love for Star Wars, and their love for each other” that was advertised as “an awesomely geeky Valentine’s Day date.”
  • Media scholar Henry Jenkins ran a three-part interview with authors Catherine Belcher and Becky Herr-Stephenson, authors of Teaching Harry Potter: The Power of Imagination in the Multicultural Classroom, which Jenkins recommended as “one of the most powerful and engaging books I’ve read about American education in a long time.” In discussing student reluctance, the authors write “The first thing we question is the idea that the “whiteness” of the books negates their use in multicultural classrooms. The nature of the books themselves – their complexity and Rowling’s willingness to take on difficult and contemporary issues such as racism, genocide, classism, and difference – make them uniquely valuable.” They add “On another level, it is also important because so many white, middle to upper middle class kids DO have ample access to Potter and other popular series at home and at school. In many ways, building students’ reading confidence, helping them discover that yes, they too can tackle a book of this length or “that style,” whether they end up feeling it is ultimately for them or not, is the most valuable accomplishment.”

If you are a Star Wars or Harry Potter fan, why not contribute to Fanlore? Additions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 7 December 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories on pros “poaching” fan practices that might be of interest to fans:

  • A number of online sites noticed the Kickstarter project seeking funds to publish Fucking James Franco, “a collection of erotic fiction that describes hypothetical sexual encounters with the greatest American actor, writer, and visual artist of all time.” Although the end result is to be a book, the contributors include “visual artists, writers, musicians, and more.” Translating sound into a printed text may be the most novel thing about the effort.
  • Even more articles were written about the new Benetton campaign slashing world leaders in Photoshop. The company also planned “a series of live actions in which young people will post the images of the smooching world leaders “on the walls of locations symbolic of the desperately-needed peace process: Tel Aviv, New York, Rome, Milan, Paris.”” Fans may never have thought it would lead to world peace, but they’ve certainly led the way in enemyslash.
  • This theater review of Hugh Jackman’s one-man show, takes a PWP approach to the performance. “For that’s what this show is all about, finally the erotically charged, two-way relationship between a star and his fans. The Playbill for “Back on Broadway” makes it clear that sex is what this production is selling.” Given the actor’s personal retrospective throughout the show though, perhaps the performance is really more like an interactive RPF epic.

If you are part of a fandom and have created fanworks, or are a theater fan, why not post about it in Fanlore? Additions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 5 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about fandoms around the world that we thought were of interest:

  • In a post about the ancient history of fan fiction the Arthurian cycle is discussed as an example of how fanfic develops and how fanon can become canon over time.
  • In an interview on Bookslut author Claudio Benzecry discusses his exploration of the world of opera fandom in Argentina. The discussion centers on how he distinguishes fans from people who simply support opera, and the things he learned about enjoying life from fandom.
  • Lastly, Pop Matters published an essay by Dutch researcher Suzanne Enzerink about Gone With the Wind fandom which explores some of the differences in fan engagement that were described in 2009 by fan obsession_inc as transformational versus affirmational fandom.

There are currently no pages on Fanlore for opera or Gone With the Wind. If you’re part of those fandoms we could use your contributions!

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.