Links Roundup for 28 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about enduring fandom that might be of interest to fans:

  • Last week, US NPR radio show Fresh Air rebroadcast its interview with author Allison Pearson about her novel I Think I Love You, in which she fictionalizes her experience as a Partridge Family fan in 1970s England. She discusses both her own life and the novel, noting, “We carry our younger selves with us our whole lives, and we can measure out [our] lives somewhat by music we’ve loved or icons we’ve loved.”
  • Liz Danforth, an editor, writer, game scenario designer, and game developer discussed her turn into fan fiction, which she believes has resulted in some of her best work. “I felt the itch to write the first fiction I had even attempted in almost a decade, but I was shamefaced at the prospect of writing fanfic. I was a pro! Fanfic was for amateurs!…To my shock, I found I was still a writer after all. I had stories to tell. I had a character I adored, living in a world that I was passionate about. If there is nothing else WoW ever gave me, it gave me back a part of myself I truly believed lost. And I will be grateful forever.”
  • For those who express their fannishness without the written word, a new site, Star Wars Remix, launched this month seeking contributions from those who see their fandom in everyday objects, from thumbtacks to burgers.

If you’re part of music, gaming, or Star Wars fandom, why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 23 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about pros saying fannish things that might be of interest to fans:

  • Sci-fi author Nicola Griffiths posted about questions she was asked as part of a BBC series on the history of women in science fiction. which dealt with how gender and sexuality have been addressed in the genre. Some of her comments will resonate with fan fiction writers: “Realism, mundane fiction, can only explore gender in terms of What Is: what’s possible within the legal, cultural, and biological constraints of the reader and writer’s society. SF gets to ask What If? You could argue that SF is, essentially, a post-modernist genre, obsessed with not accepting fixed meaning.”
  • Communications scholar Nancy Baym interviewed numerous musicians for her presentation Biting and Feeding the Hands That Feed which focused on “broaden[ing] the discussion beyond what fans do to consider the richness of the ways those practices affect artists and creators.”
  • Singer Michael Bolton provided his own example of fan interaction in an interview about how his Saturday Night Live appearance as a movie fanboy, obsessed with the Pirates of the Carribean marathon he had just seen, has brought him new admirers. ““You won’t believe the people that are yelling “Jack Sparrow!” as soon as I walk on stage…I’m also getting high-fives from an audience that is not my touring audience — the 14- to 40-year-old male YouTube audience.””

If you’re part of music or sci-fi literature fandom, why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 9 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about fan protests that might be of interest to fans:

  • Fans on Tumblr planned a Blackout Day to protest changes on the site on September 3. It’s not clear how effective the protest was in terms gaining the attention of Tumblr management but it may have had an impact on site traffic.
  • During Comic-Con in July, fans protested DC Comics’ decision to reboot many of their series, a change which erased or sidelined a number of female and minority characters and contributed to the reduced number of female creators at DC. DC cited fan concerns in their announcement that they would be preparing “new projects with women creators in the coming months.”
  • Numerous fan clubs for Michael Jackson have been protesting a planned charity concert in Wales to honor him, citing concerns about where the money will go, the invited performers, and the timing of the event while the trial of Jackson’s doctor continues.
  • A fan dubbed Clipper Darrell is planning to stage a sleep-in to protest the NBA lockout which will deprive him of seeing his Clippers basketball team. Although his is a solo protest, a group of Dodgers baseball fans have staged two protests regarding poor management of their team. While the effectiveness of these efforts is in doubt, the article concludes “you have to give fans credit when they are willing to stand up for what they believe in…This group of fans is doing something about it.”

If you’re part of a fandom on Tumblr or DC Comics, why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.