5 Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Five Things Stacey Lantagne Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today’s post is with Stacey Lantagne, who volunteers as member of OTW’s Legal Advocacy project. It’s posted today to highlight the celebration of Copyright Week.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

As a volunteer for the Legal Committee, I work on behalf of OTW’s mission to protect and nurture fanworks as a legitimate creative activity. The Legal Committee monitors legislation in the United States as well as internationally, and provides comments on behalf of the interests of fan creators. For instance, recently the Legal Committee provided comments in response to New Zealand’s request for input on its review of its Copyright Act (with help from New Zealand AO3 users!). We also join briefs in legal court cases that have fanwork implications, as well as review internal procedures and policies to ensure compliance.

Read More

This Week in Fandom banner by Atiya Batts

This Week in Fandom, Volume 118

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, we’ve got a bit of a “Monday paper” edition today after the madness of SDCC, so I wanted to mention that we accept suggestions for this roundup. Just contact Communications with a story you think we should cover. Submitting something doesn’t guarantee that we’ll include it, but we welcome all submissions!


There’s a new book coming out about music fangirls, reports an article from Vice. The book, called Fangirls: Scenes From Modern Music Culture, is written by Vice music writer Hannah Ewens, and is “based on hundreds of original interviews with girl and woman music fans.” Read More

Banner: 'Spotlight on Legal Issues'

The EU Digital Single Market Directive–What it Means (and Doesn’t Mean!)

On March 26, by a pretty slim margin, the European Parliament passed the un-amended Digital Single Market Directive. This directive includes the fan-unfriendly provisions known as Articles 11 and 13 (now re-numbered to 15 and 17, but otherwise unchanged), which we have written about before in this space. We won’t sugarcoat it—it’s bad news—but it isn’t the end of the world. Nonprofit platforms like the AO3 will not be affected, and there are provisions designed to protect some of the sites and fan activities you (and we!) love. A lot remains to be seen. Here’s a close look at what the law means and what we can expect.

The European ministers still have to vote on the directive before it becomes final, but it is widely presumed that they will approve it. Assuming the European ministers approve it, the directive will then be transposed into national legislation by EU countries, at which point it will become law. Each country’s implementation may be slightly different, but will conform to the directive’s principles. Here are some of the key takeaways from the directive as it passed: Read More