Links Roundup for 5 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about fandoms around the world that we thought were of interest:

  • In a post about the ancient history of fan fiction the Arthurian cycle is discussed as an example of how fanfic develops and how fanon can become canon over time.
  • In an interview on Bookslut author Claudio Benzecry discusses his exploration of the world of opera fandom in Argentina. The discussion centers on how he distinguishes fans from people who simply support opera, and the things he learned about enjoying life from fandom.
  • Lastly, Pop Matters published an essay by Dutch researcher Suzanne Enzerink about Gone With the Wind fandom which explores some of the differences in fan engagement that were described in 2009 by fan obsession_inc as transformational versus affirmational fandom.

There are currently no pages on Fanlore for opera or Gone With the Wind. If you’re part of those fandoms we could use your contributions!

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 2 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about “next generation fandom” that may be of interest to fans:

  • The Wharton business school recently held a For the Win: Serious Gamification conference in which business, government, and education providers came together to discuss how to motivate behavior in work spaces and the marketplace by leveraging their experience with motivating television viewers and fans in online game spaces. The participants noted, however, that success in leveraging fannish behavior in the workspace was dependent on both good design and projects “that really get at something core that people really, genuinely want to do.”
  • In this ESPN post, a sports journalist notes that Twitter has not only given athletes a way to interact with fans, but has also colored the way that he reports on those athletes based upon what he learns about them through those interactions. He concludes that “Twitter has given fans a vehicle to root for players as human beings rather than as characterless objects, numerical fractions of a team.” Twitter is also enabling fans to root for shows before they air. This Adweek article describes how advertisers are pre-identifying audiences by following conversations about upcoming TV shows. This advertiser attention could allow fans to draw in financial commitments for favorite stars’ or producers’ projects before they even air.

If you’re part of gaming or sports fandoms why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Additions to the site are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 31 August 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about gender and sexuality in fandom that might be of interest to fans:

  • In a strong counterexample to the women’s invisibility problem demonstrated by the L.A. Times’ entertainment blog Hero Complex (which is subtitled “For your inner fanboy”), a group of female cosplayers at Comic Con created the Gender Bent Justice League where men and women genderswap well known superheroes. The group is making a statement as well as having fun: “We try to keep it pretty scantily clad for [the men] because that’s how women are portrayed,” says Silver. “We weren’t scantily clad for ourselves because that’s not the point. We’re showing that girls can be clothed and be superheroes because, most of the time, they aren’t.”
  • Also helping to keep women visible in fandom, Chicks Dig Time Lords, a book celebrating female Doctor Who fandom, recently won a Hugo award. The volume includes a contribution from OTW Board member Francesca Coppa: Girl Genius: Nyssa of Traken.
  • In the BitchMedia post Ambiguously Gay Wizards, actors in the Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings fandoms are cited as examples of playing gay to the fans for professional reasons. “But it also highlights how much of the cultural bandwidth Straight Men playing or imitating Gay Men is starting to take up, and how lucrative being ambiguously heteroflexible can be in securing more of the fandom’s attention”.

There are currently no entries on Fanlore for the Justice League. If you’re part of that fandom or have taken part in cosplay the site could use your contributions!

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.