Posts in Fanhackers

The OTW is Recruiting for Communications Fanhackers Staff and Translation News Volunteers

Do you love meta and research on fans? Or would you like to help translate OTW/AO3 news posts? The Organization for Transformative Works is recruiting! We’re excited to announce the opening of applications for: Communications Fanhackers Staff – closing 21 April 2021 at 23:59 UTC Translation News Volunteers – closing 21 April 2021 at 23:59 UTC We have included more information on each role below. Open roles and applications will always be available at the volunteering page. If you don’t see a role that fits with your skills and interests now, keep an eye on the listings. We plan to put up new applications every… Read more

Five Things Alex Xanthoudakis Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today’s post is with Alex Xanthoudakis, who volunteers as a Fanhackers project staffer on the Communications Committee. How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does? I’m a Fanhackers volunteer, so I help run all the Fanhackers accounts! Our mission is to help make fan studies scholarship more accessible to people, which feeds into the OTW’s larger… Read more

OTW Announces Fanhackers Relaunch

The team behind Fanhackers, the OTW’s project to make fan studies research accessible to fans, is excited to announce the relaunch of their WordPress site. Over the past years, we’ve built a wonderful following on Tumblr with quotes from academic and non-academic research on fans. We’ll stick around on Tumblr, of course. However, the new site will be a more stable platform to preserve our content. It will also make it easier for us to expand to other platforms and to support non-blog projects that Tumblr can’t accommodate easily. This week will also see our Twitter account starting a regular schedule of updates, so if… Read more

Five Things Nele Noppe Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today’s post is with Nele Noppe, who volunteers as a staffer in the Communications Committee and runs the OTW’s Fanhackers blog. How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does? I work to make fan studies more accessible for fans (and fan studies researchers) mainly by posting quotes from fan studies articles on the Fanhackers site (which… Read more

The censorship problems faced by anime and manga fans

Banner by Erin of a spotlight on an OTW logo with the words 'Spotlight on Legal Issues'

For fans of manga, anime, and other Japanese media, pointing and laughing at inaccurate mass media portrayals of Japanese pop culture has been something of a sport for decades. A few weeks ago, however, things took a slightly more serious turn.

The ball got rolling when early in June, the Japanese House of Representatives approved a long-overdue law banning the possession of child pornography. Up to now, creating and distributing child pornography was as forbidden in Japan as anywhere else, but “simple possession” had not yet been criminalized. The new law applies only to “real” child pornography and leaves alone completely fictional depictions of underage characters in sexual situations in manga, anime and other media. This exception came about after vocal protests from manga publishers, creators, fans and free speech rights activists. The story was widely reported in non-Japanese media. However, most of these reports focused on handwringing about Japan’s “failure” to clamp down on sexually explicit manga. Most shared was a CNN article filled with outrage about how the new law supposedly permits Japanese bookstores to fill their shelves with shocking cartoon porn about children.