Transformative Works and Cultures Releases Issue No. 36

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Transformative Works and Cultures has released No. 36, a general issue.

The essays in this issue focus on racial discourses, historical transformative communities, queerbaiting, owen-jouei, ethics of autoethnography, and more. Fandoms include Big Brother, pro-wrestling, and Harley Quinn. The editorial, “A new generation,” welcomes incoming editors in chief Poe Johnson and Mel Stanfill. Each issue includes articles representing theory, fannish meta, and book reviews, such as the following:

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OTW Guest Post: Martyna Szczepaniak

Every month the OTW hosts guest posts on our OTW News accounts to provide an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom. These posts express each individual’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy.

Martyna Szczepaniak is finishing her post-graduate studies in linguistics at Jagiellonian University. She is interested in the ways in which people are using language and genres on the Internet, including (one may even say focusing on) fannish texts. Today, Martyna talks about the MCU and her article in Transformative Works and Cultures.

How did you first find out about fandom and fanworks?

As with a lot of my cultural fascination it’s all my best friend fault. When I was in high school (c. 2008-2010) I bought her old phone and there was a Twilight fanfic on it. I read it, I fell in love and I wanted more. Google landed me on Fanfiction.net which was my main source of fanfic for the next few years. It was also the first time I felt I was part of a fandom because I’ve read fanfiction before — aforementioned friend was writing self-inserts with us and our favorite bands, which I was reading and commenting on. But that Twilight fanfic was the moment I started to be aware that it was much bigger that us and there are a lot of people who are writing amazing stories and sharing them with the world.

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OTW Guest Post: Júlia Dariva

Every month the OTW hosts guest posts on our OTW News accounts to provide an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom. These posts express each individual’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy.

Júlia Dariva is a senior majoring in English Language and Literature at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) in Brazil. Currently on the third year of her research internship, her interests focus on the intersections between fan productions, Queer Theory, and Linguistics. Today, Júlia talks about her article in issue 35 of Transformative Works and Cultures.

How did you first find out about fandom and fanworks?

I’m actually not sure whether this was something that existed outside of Brazil, but when I was a pre-teen in the late 2000s we had this social media website called Orkut, which worked sort of like Facebook does, I think, in the sense that you created a profile for yourself so you could interact with friends and join communities. There were communities for all sorts of stuff — from “I hate typing errors” to “never have I ever died before” to “I’ve never used a whole eraser” and whatnot — and the communities you were in would show up at the bottom of your profile, so the ones you chose to be part of worked very much as ways to describe yourself to your friends.

Among the communities you could join, a lot were dedicated to the discussion of different characters, shows, celebrities, etc. In these, people would engage in fan activities such as writing meta, sharing their video editing, role playing, and writing fan fiction, for example. There were communities dedicated to fan fiction writing in general, too, where you would find more or less random assortments of fandoms.

Though some fan fiction authors would post their work from their real-life profiles, I believe the majority of us would interact in these communities through what we called “fakes”, which were basically role-playing profiles made up of random names and pictures of different characters and/or celebrities.
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