Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality

  • OTW Fannews: Fanworks of Note

    Av Pip Janssen på torsdagen, 13 augusti 2015 - 4:16pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Rachel of a generic newspaper with the OTW logo and the words ‘OTW Fannews’

    • An article at Huffington Post featured interpretations of Harry Potter characters that raceswapped their movie representations. "For many artists, Hermione's vague physical description has presented an opportunity to represent the character very differently. Instead of the 'bushy' hair JK Rowling often describes in the books, maybe she has kinky-curly hair. Instead of simply being tan, maybe she has dark brown skin. A black Hermione Granger isn't just a chance to see something new, but an opportunity to create a more complex reading of the book series, which has political themes that draw parallels between the Death Eaters and racist hate groups."
    • A post at io9 directed viewers to a tribute video of Hayao Miyazaki's work. "Vimeo user and animator Dono made this incredible video, which combines the beautiful piano work of Joe Hisaishi with extracted clips and characters from a plethora of Miyazaki films, from Spirited Away to My Neighbor Totoro to Porco Rosso, placing them into specially created 3D environments made by Dono."
    • Ventura County Reporter presented an outsider's view of cosplay at an Attack on Titan event. "One thing I realized at the premiere: Don’t mess with cosplayers or their parents. For instance, after a guard moved us media folks in with the fans, a mother and father advised their costumed children to push me out of the way. Then, a few seconds later, as the crowd swelled, the nearby blood-soaked cosplayer had a valiant defender complain to the crowd: 'My friend has social anxiety, like, really bad, and you need to give her some space.'...I guarantee that most of the fans didn’t even know the actors’ actual names. What was important was that the actors actually got to fully portray the characters that the fans had bonded with so closely."
    • Canada's The Globe and Mail discussed the future of Hannibal and its fanworks. "Whether or not another episode ever gets made, Hannibal is already a legacy show. Its disciples will still long be writing homoerotic fan fiction about the none-too-subtle love affair between Hannibal and Will, still be admiring the show’s layers of complexity, still be watching and rewatching until every facet is explored. With half a season left to securely enjoy, there’s still an opportunity to experience this legend while it lives, regardless of its fate."

    What are some of your favorite fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Getting Canon

    Av Katie på söndagen, 26 juli 2015 - 4:01pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    OTW Fannews Getting Canon

    • Forbes hosted an article about cartoon fandom in Zambia and the difficulty in obtaining canon. "'It’s literally impossible to find anime DVDs in stores here,' said Banda. 'Also, the last anime I saw in a Zambian cinema was [Studio Ghibli film] Ponyo. So yeah, access is pretty rough.' Even today, DVDs and BluRay are Zambians’ only legal options, as 'streaming legally is pretty much out of the question,' Banda said, referring to Crunchyroll, Funimation, and other websites’ region locking for much of Africa. Since the local currency, the Zambian kwacha, is weak compared to the Euro, fans often obtain anime through piracy when that’s all they can afford."
    • Science Fiction.com wrote about a donation to the OTW's partner institution, the University of Iowa. "73-year-old Allen Lewis spent the last 20 years collecting more than 17,000 books. Many of them are in the science fiction and fantasy realm as Lewis sought to rekindle his childhood love for those genres. Lewis has been a sci-fi fan since he was 12...Many of Lewis’ books are first editions and first printings. His collection includes 30,000 signatures from authors, editors and artists." Don't forget that the Open Doors project helps fans arrange donations of fannish memorabilia to the Iowa collection, so contact them with questions about your own collection!
    • NBC Philadelphia was among those profiling the local furry community "Ward, who helps organize the local group, didn't identify as a Furry until 2008, after she graduated from Marietta College in Ohio. Like many local Furries, she found her way into fandom through its anthropomorphic artwork. 'It's kind of an all-or-nothing thing,' she said. 'You start going, they drag you to the convention, and that's it, you're done.' Around Pennsylvania, Furries congregate on one online forum, www.pa-furry.org, and a handful of Facebook and Twitter groups. Anywhere between a dozen and a hundred Furries, friends and family show up to the local events, which become more frequent in the summer."
    • The New York Times hosted a discussion about fannish nostalgia. "Alas, I will never be 9 years old in 1987 ever again, and though it’s fun to romanticize the past, I don’t want to mistake fondness for excellence...Much like my friendships with the other members of my Full House Club, whom I sporadically see in my Facebook feed with their own 9-year-olds, my fandom seems unsustainable now. Better, then, to let the children of today discover and obsess about their own TV shows. Don’t remake the sweet smarm of our youth. I’ll be fine without it. I can always read up on some Uncle Jesse and Uncle Joey fan-fic if ever I’m feeling sentimental."

    What stories about fans and canon have you been part of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Similar to Fanfic

    Av Claudia Rebaza på torsdagen, 9 juli 2015 - 3:30pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Kat of multiple typewriters with the sheet in one reading 'OTW Fannews: Similar to Fanfic'

    • An article in The Telegraph discussed how fan speculation in sports fandom is a form of fanfic. "At the heart of fan fiction’s appeal is a sort of wish fulfilment: a subtle remaking of the world in which one’s wildest fantasies can gush uncontrollably to the surface. And while a good deal of fan fiction is sexual in nature, much of it is just quite sweet: charming teenage reveries that begin with a single pleasant idea – 'wouldn’t it be nice if'...In a fortnight's time we see the opening of the transfer window, and yet despite the two being ostensibly unrelated, it strikes me that there are certain similarities between the millions of stories that teenage girls tell each other on Tumblr, and the millions of stories that football will tell itself over the next three months. For the reopening of the summer window marks the ceremonial point at which football subtly shifts in character: from a real game played on the pitch, to a fantasy enacted largely in the imagination."
    • Salon discussed the focus on women in the new season of Halt and Catch Fire. "This season...has an exuberance the first season struggled to reach, and it’s because of a storytelling device that has more popularity in fan fiction archives than Hollywood studios: the gender swap. It’s a thought experiment that pops up in fervent fandoms, ones that are also eagerly reimagining beloved characters in different settings or with new adventures...As with so many elements of fandom, it’s casually subversive—a re-creation that grapples with the social construction of gender and imagines its infinite fluidity. And as with so many elements of fandom, it is a long-standing tradition—one that Shakespeare made regular use of in his plays, which itself was a commentary on the fact that all the female roles were played by men."
    • A guest post in The Japan News explained cover dancing which "is a fun activity in which teams of dancers emulate the moves of Japanese or South Korean idols as they dance to the original music. Spectators cheer for them as if they were the real deal. While cover dancing is gaining more and more fans in Japan, I’ve often met fans in Thailand, Hong Kong and nearby areas, as well as in the United States and Latin America. I think cover dancing is similar to fan fiction for anime and manga in dojin culture, in which fans create their own works using popular manga and anime characters."
    • An article at The Guardian discussed academic analyses of fan activities on Frozen. "Fan responses have boomed on the internet and given rise to myriad readings. In fact, academia now lags behind fans when it comes to subjecting popular culture to intense analysis. The online debate about, say, Mad Men could sustain a conference for weeks. 'Fan studies talks about how carefully and critically audiences discuss texts...The internet has made fan responses so much more mainstream and accessible.' In the past, she says, you would need to do focus groups to yield similar information. 'I think the way in which it’s been really popular with traditionally marginalised communities is specific to Elsa’s characterisation...It can resonate with people who have been ostracised or stigmatised.'”

    What things have you seen compared to fanfiction? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages!

  • OTW Fannews: Who's Fandoming Now?

    Av Ellorgast på tisdagen, 23 juni 2015 - 4:29pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Several people are silhouetted against a sky fading after sunset, posing as though dancing.  Text in front of them reads 'OTW Fannews: Who's Fandoming Now?'

    • South Africa's Daily Maverick provided an overview of fandom with some definitions. "You cannot be a part of fandom if you love something but do not interact with fellow fans. Fandom is less a kingdom of fanatics and more a kinship of one...Imagine this happening; a group of fans sit down, someone says I really thought x should have been y and almost everyone agrees on the fact. Not that big a deal, right? Now imagine that they do that same thing on the internet. Suddenly the scope of people who are meaningfully discussing and often reach consensus numbers in the thousands, tens of thousands, sometimes much more than that. That alone is a powerful thing; hard for the original creator of a book or TV show to ignore, but it is not the only powerful thing about fandom."
    • As each year passes, it seems most people take part in fandom in some way, however unlikely. It's also increasingly seen as a professional outlet. ABS CBN News featured live erotica readings in the Philippines that included fanfic creations, though these at least were created by the performers. " The writers dream up their concoctions in various formats: monologues, radio plays, fan fiction, interactive games. They draw inspiration from everywhere: history, art, science, comic books, movies. Once a draft is ready, it’s submitted to a core group of writers who conduct an informal workshop, offering comments and and revision, until there’s a general consensus that the work is ready."
    • The Daily Beast focused on print erotica, interviewing a writer selling U.S. president fanfic on Amazon. "'I wanted to write something that had never been done, but then I thought, ‘Oh, this is a really interesting idea,’' he said, before adding that in fact, presidential erotica has sort of been done. 'There was some [erotica] that involved sex with four presidents, but they were all consecutive. No one had sex with William Howard Taft (1909-1913) but also Richard Nixon." No mention was made of Historical RPF fanworks.
    • As a conversation between Neil Gaiman and Kazuo Ishiguro at The New Statesman pointed out, commercializing fanwork is hardly new. "I love the fact that, you know, in the early versions of King Lear, the story had a happy ending. Shakespeare turned it into a tragedy, and through the 18th and 19th centuries they kept trying to give it a happy ending again. But people kept going back to the one that Shakespeare created. You could definitely view Shakespeare as fan fiction, in his own way. I’ve only ever written, as far as I know, one book that did the thing that happens when people online get hold of it and start writing their own fiction, which was Good Omens, which I did with Terry Pratchett. It’s a 100,000-word book; there’s probably a million words of fiction out there by now, written by people who were inspired by characters in the book." (Gaiman is mistaken about the limits of his success, though).

    Make sure your own favorite fanworks don't get forgotten: write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Transformative Works and Cultures Releases Issue 19

    Av Claudia Rebaza på onsdagen, 17 juni 2015 - 4:09pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Alice of a book/eReader with an OTW bookmark and a USB plug going into the spine

    Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 19, “Transnationalism, Localization, and Translation in European Fandom,” guest edited by Anne Kustritz (University of Amsterdam), has been released. This special issue focuses on global media and transnational studies, as well as European fan practices, broadly conceived. The issue comprises scholarly research articles, a section on pedagogy, essays related to specific countries’ fandoms, and a book review.

    As Kustritz writes in her editorial, “The articles in this issue center a global perspective, which questions assumptions about what it means to be a media fan and how the industry perceives international audiences. Therefore, the articles also address factors that persistently complicate and limit the global flow of media and fan communities.

    Paul J. Booth leads the Pedagogy section with “Fandom: The Classroom of the Future,” in which he claims that “once formal schooling is complete, one's fandom may be one of the only places where one is encouraged to think critically, to write, to discuss deeply, and to make thoughtful and critical judgments about hegemonic culture”. The three interlinked essays that follow, led by Amanda Gilroy and including work by her master’s level students, present the results of a class based around Ien Ang’s groundbreaking Watching Dallas (1982, 1985) and include audience analysis of European watchers of the Dallas (2012–14) reboot.

    The Symposium section includes essays addressing fandom in Germany, Sweden, Poland, France, Spain, and Putin’s Russia.

    Several essays discuss European fandoms surrounding American texts: two essays consider Bruce Springsteen fandom (Bill Wolff, Maryn Claire Wilkinson), one addresses Polish fan responses to the popular podcast Welcome to Night Vale (Agata Włodarczyk, Marta Tyminska), and another discusses Italian fandoms of American TV shows (Eleonora Benecchi). Two essays address texts based on European fandoms, including MTV’s Welsh reality show, The Valleys (Bethan Jones), and football fandom (Abby Waysdorf).

  • OTW Fannews: Participation & Representation

    Av Katie på söndagen, 31 maj 2015 - 5:00pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Rachel of a generic newspaper with the OTW logo and the words 'OTW Fannews'

    • Several sites wrote about the effort to #DiversifyAgentCarter which was launched by the tweet 'Someone should create a #DiversifyAgentCarter tag & fill it with facts about the 40’s in New York so the writers have no excuse.'" As the post at Women Write About Comics discussed, "[P]eople began adding stories and photos of women and minorities who played integral roles during World War II and the post-war period, painting a much less white New York City than the one Agent Carter depicts, from Drag Balls to integrated government agencies to plenty of women spies. The hashtag is worth checking out if you’re interested in learning about some forgotten heroes of history."
    • A post at NPR's 'Code Switch' blog added: "Honestly, I blame Black History Month for this. So often, we focus on history that fits within a narrow range: The civil rights movement, the Civil War, American slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. While those are all important pieces of history to focus on, they are not the whole story — and they lead people who've only ever paid attention to black history during February to presume that we did not exist outside of those particular moments in time."
    • UCLA's Asia Institute hosted a presentation on Writing on Star Actresses: Politics, Morality and Literati Fandom in Early Republican Beijing. PhD candidate Jiacheng Liu had focused her dissertation on "how women, previously banned by the Qing dynasty, entered into the male-dominated theater profession and helped to reshape the repertoire and performance, redefine femininity, and facilitate a range of new social and cultural arrangements in the early Republican Beijing."
    • IBN Live recently brought back a more current example of Chinese fandom, this one focusing on 'F.R.I.E.N.D.S'. In an NPR feature, the owner of 2 cafes modeled on 'Central Perk' discussed its popularity. "Reruns of the show serve as a language-learning tool for Chinese university students. The show is particularly popular for its use of colloquial language and as an introduction to American culture. It's also popular because of the laid-back, friendship-filled lifestyle it portrays, far from the stressful, competitive world that Chinese young people inhabit. 'That's why we like Friends...[w]e're looking for this kind of life.'"

    Fanlore could use more content about non-English fandom activities! If you know it, share it -- contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Doing Your Part

    Av Kelly Ribeiro på tisdagen, 12 maj 2015 - 4:49pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Doing Your Part

    • NPR was among some reporting on a new Russian policy that began banning some memes. "In effect it really bans all memes using celebrities. Insofar as the language of this announcement, which was posted on VKontakte (ph) - which is the Russian equivalent of Facebook - they said that any images that use famous people's identities, or images, they're against the law if they take that image out of context of that person's reputation." However, "this decision is totally unenforceable. The entire point is not to purge the Internet of bad things. It's to make people online afraid of getting in trouble."
    • The New York Times warned that Net Neutrality progress in the U.S. didn't mean that it wasn't under threat elsewhere. "Last month, the European Council...adopted a proposal that would allow telecommunications companies to charge Internet businesses like Netflix and Google fees to deliver their videos and other content to users faster than could smaller companies that cannot afford to pay for preferential treatment. In India, the country’s telecommunications regulator asked for comments on whether it should adopt a provision similar to what Europe is considering. The regulator also asked if telecom companies should be able to charge users extra fees for services like YouTube, WhatsApp and Skype on top of the fees people already pay for access to the Internet."
    • The OTW has petitioned for a renewal of a DMCA exemption for fan video makers. Our Legal team has been asking that fans write in about their need for high quality source from sources that are only available on Blu-Ray; or sources from places like iTunes or Amazon when that's necessary to make a timely vid to participate in an ongoing fannish conversation. OTW Staffers will be testifying before the Copyright Office at the end of May to extend their rights to break encryption to Blu-Ray, as well as maintain them for DVD and streaming sources.

    What efforts have you seen fans making to oppose restrictive laws? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: About and By

    Av thatwasjustadream på söndagen, 10 maj 2015 - 3:49pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner with the words OTW fannews and the OTW logo along with lines suggesting an envelope and rows of text on a computer screen

    • Arab Times reported on a new comedy, Ana Maria in Novela Land which features a bodyswapping heroine. "Ana Maria [is] an under-achieving twentysomething who spends far too much time focused on the soap. Between live-tweeting the telenovela while it airs, writing fan fiction featuring its lead characters, and spending almost every waking moment mulling over new plot developments, Ana Maria has little time for anything else." They conclude that the show's "sporadic tweaking of telenovelas and the fans who love them is often quite clever."
    • Caped Crusades featured the fan art of Brazilian artist Rick Celis involving Batman and DC villains. Included were Gotham’s female villains as the Powerpuff Girls, and an Abbey Road take on the Joker.
    • The Hollywood Reporter was one of many sources linking to a Harry Potter parody video with original footage set to the song "Uptown Funk." Created by a group of university students, its quick success may stem in part from J.K. Rowling tweeting that she'd enjoyed it.
    • Dork Side of the Force featured the anime style fanfilm 'TIE Fighter'. "Seriously, the amount of detail in this video is astounding. Some of this stuff, like the detailed interiors of the Star Destroyer and TIE fighters, we’ve never even seen in the films before. And it all looks seamless, even in anime style."
    • A project called OTP The Show has dubbed itself "A new web series about friendship - and smutty Hobbit fan fiction." A trailer is currently available and the first of three episodes will be debuting in April.

    What are your favorite fanworks or works about fans? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Skewing the Process

    Av Claudia Rebaza på söndagen, 19 april 2015 - 5:23pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Kat of a scale with 'OTW Fannews' on one side and 'Skewing the process' on the other

    • Matt Binder wrote in Salon that right-wing conservatives in the U.S. were trying to exploit the activities of misogynistic fans for personal gain and political capital. "A common tactic used by right-wingers is the call to 'stop politicizing everything' — while at the same time trying to push forth their own political agenda in the culture wars, of course. Keeping politics out of any art form is laughable, but there is a certain extra level of hilarity in attempting to do so with one that already has a long history of social justice...these are actual panels from an actual Green Lantern co-starring Green Arrow comic from April 1970 addressing racial justice head-on."
    • At Medium is the Message, Rex Sorgatz discussed changing habits regarding spoilers. "Back in the aughts, we survived a similar crisis, when two cultural events coincided:The quality of television programming suddenly got much better [and] The conversations around television exploded on social media. The collision of these trends triggered a nuclear reaction — a pop culture fission, spewing immense heat. People got very, very serious about The Spoiler Alert. The burgeoning recap society, in particular, was put under immense scrutiny."
    • Japan Times talked about how marketing tricks meant fans were skewing the music sales charts. "The problem is that music purchases by idol fans aren’t really music purchases at all: They are a sort of abstract currency by which the fans make extravagant expressions of love for the group — the more you buy, the greater your love. They’re a completely different class of consumer from someone who simply buys a song in order to listen to it, and trying to force them to behave like traditional music fans misses the point."
    • The Millions featured a long piece from Elizabeth Minkel on academic courses on fanfiction. "The cynical side of me expected to hear that a fanfiction class in an Ivy League English department would’ve been met with criticism from the old guard...But [Jamison] hasn’t encountered professional backlash at Princeton or back home in Utah. 'I’m sure there are people who think that but they haven’t told me about it — not my colleagues...I get more pushback on YA and, frankly, on Victorian women’s poetry than I do on fanfic. Nothing can match the snideness with which male scholars of modernism tend to regard Victorian poetry by women.'”

    Where have you seen fans changing cultural practices? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Coming Together

    Av Kelly Ribeiro på torsdagen, 16 april 2015 - 5:59pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Jared Padalecki

    • Bustle's Emma Lord focused on the successful protest of a fanfiction 'comedy' act at WonderCon as part of discussing misconceptions about fanfic writers that she's tired of. "WonderCon recently had to pull Chris Gore’s 'Fan Fic Theater' panel, in which he was going to read out loud actual fan fiction and make fun of it for sport. Like many fellow authors, I took to Twitter to question what the panel was for, and within thirty seconds of my incredibly civil tweet asking what was up, I’d been blocked by Chris Gore himself...It didn’t take long for the convention to cancel the whole thing, because duh, WonderCon, you can’t make fun of the very audience for your event and expect them to not get defensive about it."
    • The Age reported on fans' reactions to the murder of a cosplayer in Australia with a display of numerous pieces of fan art. "[A] global group of cosplay fans...are expressing their grief through art. Masa Vukotic was a well-regarded member of the cosplay - or costume play - community...Many members of Melbourne's cosplay community have paid tribute to the teen with sketches and paintings of Masa dressed in her signature 'lolita' style. Some admitted they had never met Masa, but felt compelled to draw images of her or post photos of themselves wearing pink in her honour, her favourite colour."
    • Comic Book Resources wrote about a discussion on The Nightly Show about fandom and diversity. Marvel’s director of content and character development, Phil Jimenez, said "It feels strange to me that we would partition race, gender and nerd as if they were distinct things...All human beings are this combination of experiences and ideologies. […] Everybody’s get some nerd in them. But the idea that, somehow, being a nerd is separate from one’s religious or moral or political beliefs is strange to me. We all bring everything to our decision-making on a daily basis.”
    • Fusion.net reported on the success of various actor-led charity campaigns. "Padalecki’s campaign is the latest example of a burgeoning form of celebrity activism—one inextricably intertwined with social media and the nerdiest brand of superfandom. The new activism is kicked off by a star—in this case, the lead of a show that has a massive following on Tumblr—but powered by his admirers. (Incidentally, all examples involve male stars and their largely female fan bases.) The star, in turn, interacts with fans about the campaign, energizing the cause. Everyone feels good knowing they’re fighting for the same thing."

    What cases have you seen of fans coming together? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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