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  • OTW Fannews: Staying Vigilant

    Опубликовал(а) Elise Thrasher в воскресенье, 30 августа 2015 - 7:04pm
    Тип новости:

    Text backgound overlayed with a Batman Mask alongside the article title OTW Fannews: Staying Vigilant

    • The Japan News posted a story about how a Trans-Pacific Partnership crackdown could affect fanfiction publishing. "[T]he 12 nations engaged in the TPP negotiations are building a consensus that would allow for prosecution of copyright infringement without the need for a formal complaint, but instead based on reports from third parties or an independent judgement by an investigative authority." This contrasts with Japan's current system, "copyright infringement can only be investigated after a formal complaint from the creator of the original work or its rights holder."
    • Changes to their system would also allow for many false claims to result in takedowns. Kotaku reported on the widespread action against videos that had no connection to copyrighted content. "Last week, the anti-piracy firm Entura International, which frequently works with Pixels distributor Columbia Pictures, filed a big old DMCA complaint—as first reported by TorrentFreak—that goes after a bunch of videos not for pirating or violating copyright in any way, but for using the word “Pixels,” which it turns out was invented in 2015 by Adam Sandler."
    • The Daily Dot reported on an alarming development connected to Windows 10's End User License Agreement. "Microsoft won't hesitate to make sure the programs and games you have installed on your computer are legitimate, and if not, it has the right to disable them." The agreement includes preventing "unauthorized hardware peripheral devices" but who determines legitimate use could be a problem.

    What areas do you think fans should remain vigilant about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Keepers of the Flame

    Опубликовал(а) Sarah Remy в пятницу, 21 августа 2015 - 4:02pm
    Тип новости:

    OTW Fannews Banner title in red with envelope icon

    • At Nerd Reactor Genevieve LeBlanc wrote about the joy of fandom. "It was Simon Pegg that said that being a geek was 'a license to proudly emote on a somewhat childish level rather than behave like a supposed adult. Being a geek is extremely liberating.' For me, it means I have the ability to take joy from small moments like these. The happiness is disproportional to the actual significance of the event; I got immense entertainment with friends about two Coke bottles sharing names with fictional characters. It’s absolutely meaningless, but being a nerd means that it gets to make me happy. And who can deny the benefit of a little extra happiness in our lives?"
    • At ESPN CricInfo Ahmer Naqvi took a thoughtful look at what fan activities consist of. "The realisation coincided with a time in my life when I was experiencing and learning to enjoy so much more that the world had to offer...suddenly everything in cricket (other than perhaps an India-Pakistan game) was expendable in a way it hadn't been before. And it is then that a part of me could finally accept, and be even confident of the fact, that not adhering to the rituals I had made up in my head didn't mean that I didn't love the game. Because eventually it wasn't about what I needed to prove to others but about what it gave to me."
    • At Noisey, Luke Winkie took a look back at the relevance of Wizard Rock. "There are still some wizard rock bands propping up the scene—hiding out in ancient Myspaces or hidden Bandcamps. But none are quite as active or in-demand like Harry and the Potters...It didn’t matter who you were, you could always relate to someone about Hogwarts. It’s hard to find stuff like that in adulthood. The fandom has dissipated in popular culture, so you’re forced to keep it alive in your head. It makes Harry and the Potters a nostalgia act, to a certain extent—expected from a band that’s only put out two new songs in the last five years. 'People come to our shows to reconnect to that ‘midnight release party’ vibe,' says Paul DeGeorge. 'It conjures a lot of those feelings that haven’t been exercised in years.'”
    • The Orlando Weekly took note of a planned fanfiction reading. "Love it or hate it, fan fiction has become one of the most popular literary forms of the 21st century. Hordes of scribblers of wildly varying talent regularly post hundreds of thousands of unauthorized expansions of various fandoms to sites like AO3 or FanFiction.net. Some fanfic writers even get published after doing a search-and-replace of proper nouns and we all suffer for it (*cough*Fifty Shades*cough*). So of course local literary kingpins Jesse Bradley of There Will Be Words and John King of 'The Drunken Odyssey' have teamed up to, uh, celebrate the genre."

    What have you seen that best expresses the love of fandoms? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Effects

    Опубликовал(а) Kirsten Korona в среду, 19 августа 2015 - 6:08pm
    Тип новости:

    Graphic Title

    • Film School Rejects hosted an article discussing how fandom is affecting movie media sites. "The upsides to all of this are obvious if you’re the kind of fan who loves scoops, behind-the-scenes rumors, set photos, and every element of The Possible. The downsides are less obvious...The first is that conversations about older movies (including stuff from way, way back in 2014) are muted, and, in some cases, harder to find...The second is that we’re all asking to be lied to. In the past decade, movie news has devolved from done deals to rumors."
    • The L.A. Review of Books discussed the relevance of YA literature to media literacy. "Authors and filmmakers know that young people don’t just consume; they make stuff, too. So featuring characters who create content themselves is a key to attracting the attention of young readers and viewers" which should lead parents and teachers to "think about how such stories guide young people to think about their private use of multimedia. What messages do they send about such use, about how young people should be thinking about both media consumption and media making?" Professor Jonathan Alexander concludes, "If you’re a kid, keep an open mind about what you’re reading and watching. And think about making your own movies to share your ideas and keep the conversation going."
    • The Providence Journal in Rhode Island, U.S. discovered how widely media can spread when they ran a Lovecraft fanfic contest. "We received nearly 200 responses, including submissions from as far away as Brazil, Pakistan and New Zealand. In a frightening sign of Lovecraft’s international stature, we received submissions from more than a dozen foreign countries, including multiple entries from England (4), Italy (3), Australia (2) and Germany (4). Individual Lovecraft fans in France, Mexico, Scotland, India and Trinidad & Tobago also submitted stories. Closer to home, we received submissions from 27 states, three Canadian provinces and one U.S. commonwealth (Puerto Rico)."
    • Tech Insider discussed the spreading use of the term shipping. “'Kids often use the word when talking about [characters from] TV shows and movies, but it’s also become a slang term for describing any two people that you want to get together'...In a sense, some people were shipping over 100 years ago, according to Know Your Meme. They just weren't calling it that. In 1913, the book 'Old Friends, New Fancies' featured characters from Jane Austen’s 'Pride and Prejudice' re-imagined in new relationships.

    How have you seen fans changing language and media? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Bedfellows

    Опубликовал(а) Ellorgast в воскресенье, 16 августа 2015 - 4:09pm
    Тип новости:

    Swirly text surrounded by pink flowers, hearts, and a cupid reading

    • The University of Leicester announced a conference on Fandom and Religion. "'Fandom is a major activity today: people’s passions become major commitments, and fans start seeming like religious devotees,' says Dr Clive Marsh, Director of Lifelong Learning at the University of Leicester, who is one of the organisers. 'I am particularly interested in researching the intensity with which people exercise their fandom, and how this signals the meaning and purpose that people find in, and through, their fan activity. Functionally at least, this can prove to be very similar indeed to religious practice.'”
    • BizCommunity discussed results of a survey of music fans and categorized them by eight 'Logics of Engagement'. "Music fans engage in their passion differently country by country. For example, the festive culture of Brazilians make them the fans that engage most strongly through the logic of Social Connection (62%), whereas 9 out of 10 Chinese fans engage through the logic of Play. Furthermore, age matters. Young fans aged 13-17 engage the most strongly through Immersion when they listen to music (64%). A majority of fans that are 35 and older engage through the Logic of Exploration (59%)."
    • Barnes and Noble was targeting fangirls as part of its Pop Culture events. "Barnes & Noble is calling all fangirls to its stores nationwide for a special Fangirl Friday meet-up...to celebrate fandom. From 'Potterheads' to 'Whovians' to YA Booklovers, there’s a fandom for everyone, and Barnes & Noble is calling all fangirls to unite and visit their local store to enjoy special events, giveaways and more. Cosplay is welcomed. Additionally, while supplies last, customers can pick up the Vinyl Vixen Metallic Wonder Woman, available only at Barnes & Noble."
    • Cosmopolitan discussed an unfortunate overlap between Cameron Dallas fans and porn viewers. "Cameron Dallas is a dreamy, wholesome male Vine and YouTube star who is 20 years old. As is typical of this genre of celebrity, his fans are mostly teen girls. So I found it pretty disturbing last night when those fans started posting tons of selfies for Cameron on Twitter under their fandom name: Cam Girls. Anyone who has used the Internet probably knows what a cam girl is (other than a Cameron Dallas fan, apparently) and if you don't, I'll just tell you right now: "Cam girl" is short for "webcam girl," a woman who strips and does porn via webcam for money. Another fact about cam girls is that — like most other businesses — they often use Twitter to foster a following."

    What strange bedfellows have you seen in fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanworks of Note

    Опубликовал(а) Pip Janssen в четверг, 13 августа 2015 - 4:16pm
    Тип новости:

    Banner by Rachel of a generic newspaper with the OTW logo and the words ‘OTW Fannews’

    • An article at Huffington Post featured interpretations of Harry Potter characters that raceswapped their movie representations. "For many artists, Hermione's vague physical description has presented an opportunity to represent the character very differently. Instead of the 'bushy' hair JK Rowling often describes in the books, maybe she has kinky-curly hair. Instead of simply being tan, maybe she has dark brown skin. A black Hermione Granger isn't just a chance to see something new, but an opportunity to create a more complex reading of the book series, which has political themes that draw parallels between the Death Eaters and racist hate groups."
    • A post at io9 directed viewers to a tribute video of Hayao Miyazaki's work. "Vimeo user and animator Dono made this incredible video, which combines the beautiful piano work of Joe Hisaishi with extracted clips and characters from a plethora of Miyazaki films, from Spirited Away to My Neighbor Totoro to Porco Rosso, placing them into specially created 3D environments made by Dono."
    • Ventura County Reporter presented an outsider's view of cosplay at an Attack on Titan event. "One thing I realized at the premiere: Don’t mess with cosplayers or their parents. For instance, after a guard moved us media folks in with the fans, a mother and father advised their costumed children to push me out of the way. Then, a few seconds later, as the crowd swelled, the nearby blood-soaked cosplayer had a valiant defender complain to the crowd: 'My friend has social anxiety, like, really bad, and you need to give her some space.'...I guarantee that most of the fans didn’t even know the actors’ actual names. What was important was that the actors actually got to fully portray the characters that the fans had bonded with so closely."
    • Canada's The Globe and Mail discussed the future of Hannibal and its fanworks. "Whether or not another episode ever gets made, Hannibal is already a legacy show. Its disciples will still long be writing homoerotic fan fiction about the none-too-subtle love affair between Hannibal and Will, still be admiring the show’s layers of complexity, still be watching and rewatching until every facet is explored. With half a season left to securely enjoy, there’s still an opportunity to experience this legend while it lives, regardless of its fate."

    What are some of your favorite fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfic From Past to Present

    Опубликовал(а) thatwasjustadream в воскресенье, 9 августа 2015 - 5:01pm
    Тип новости:

    image of many hand-drawn hourglasses lying in a pile at various angles, with the word OTW Fannews, fanfic from past to present on the right hand side

    • Library Journal wrote about the OTW's partner library at the University of Iowa. They have begun digitizing fanfiction. "High acid paper is flaking and finely rendered illustrations are fading, and with them, the records of thriving fan communities stretching back as far as the 1930s, predating heated debates over Kirk vs Picard by decades. These communities were as lively as any message board conversation or LiveJournal debate...'This is not an overview or analysis of science fiction; these are the very objects that built it, publications made by fans for fans, in basements and living rooms across the world—this is the material history of the genre...Science fiction is an immense tapestry, and all of these publications must be recognized as threads in order to better understand the whole picture.'”
    • Tech Times tried to give a snapshot of fanfic history. "Jumping ahead to the 20th century, the actual term "fanfiction" was coined in 1939 by the sci-fi community as a derogatory term to differentiate between crude, amateur sci-fi fiction and professional fiction, or "pro fiction."...It popped up again in a 1944 lexiconic fandom handbook titled Fancyclopedia...as: '[sometimes] improperly used to mean fan science fiction, that is, ordinary fantasy published in a fan magazine... occasionally bringing in some famous characters stf [science fiction] stories. [...] Fictitious elements are often interspersed in account of fan activities, which may make them more interesting, but plays hob with a truth-seeker like [Greek philosopher] Thukydides. Round robins have been attempted in the fan fiction field.'"
    • An article at Huffington Post discussed the similarities and differences of fanfic and profic. "[T]he unpolished prose of a pre-Mockingbird Lee seems like a bit of self-conscious Mary-Sue-ism. Meanwhile, Atticus’ darker edge calls to mind the weirder, grittier fanfics -- the ones where Edward Cullen becomes a violent dominant with a tortured past, for example. He’s been abruptly jerked to fit into a new character mold, with some conflicted authorial consciousness of his old one. Go Set a Watchman has more to offer than typical fanfic, at least in one particular way: It’s asking (particularly white) readers to confront the idea that their white savior idols aren’t worth putting on altars."
    • Digital Spy reported that the Big Bang Theory's writers have been reading the show's fanfiction. "'We started out a little bit nervous about it and we actually kind of got wrapped up in it,' writer Steve Holland revealed. 'It was a story about what happened to Amy on prom night that wasn't part of the episode, and it was actually really sweet and affecting. So we started off a little bit as a joke reading this, and then we really got into the story and what was happening.' Steven Molaro added: 'There's a storyline where Penny and Bernadette get so wrapped up in Amy's fan fiction – that's absolutely what happened to us in the writers' room with the Big Bang Theory fan fiction that we found.'"

    What part of fanfic's history have you been a part of? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Tourism

    Опубликовал(а) Claudia Rebaza в воскресенье, 2 августа 2015 - 3:01pm
    Тип новости:

    Banner by Alice of a road sign reading OTW Fannews: Fandom Tourism and a dotted path from a compass to an X

    • Media outlets have been engaged in 'fandom tourism' articles for some time. Although there are fewer articles these days demonstrating surprise that fandom or fanworks exist, there are still a number of fandom profiles that either serve to stoke fandom nostalgia by pointing out activity surrounding a particular canon, or by demonstrating surprise that works exist in a specific fandom. Some recent examples were run in Jezebel, Flavorwire, and The New York Times.
    • While the spate of fandom tourism articles may have been inspired by San Diego Comic Con (SDCC), other articles involved SDCC directly. In a post at Belief Net, Nell Minow discussed her participation in the San Diego Comic Con panel Fandom: The Next Generation. "We all dream of sharing our passions with our children. But it is important to be careful about it. Everyone on the panel had a story about sharing the wrong movie — or the right movie too soon — with a child who got upset, and feeling that we had 'flunked parenting.' Young children will say what they think you want to hear and if it seems too important to you, they will tell you they like something when they really do not."
    • NPR talked with screenwriter Nicole Perlman, who discussed her excitement at seeing fans of her next project. "Perlman says she got very excited the first time she saw someone dressed up as her new project, Captain Marvel. 'She looked fantastic, so I completely accosted her and I kind of whispered it shyly, 'I'm writing the movie, take a picture with me please!'"
    • Polygon contrasted the approaches of Marvel and Warner Bros when fans promoted their new projects. "When trailers leaked from Comic Con, because studios show things to huge halls of people who are all carrying recording equipment and still think they can control the footage, the response from Warner Bros. was, to put it mildly, messed up." Writer Ben Kuchera concluded, "The reaction to the Suicide Squad footage was mostly positive; this was a great thing for Warner Bros. until they had to stomp in and make sure we knew they didn't approve of the way we were excited about their product and everyone needs to cut it out at once or they'll turn this movie right around and drive home."

    What articles could your write about your fandoms? Don't wait! Post them to Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Asking and Getting

    Опубликовал(а) Claudia Rebaza в четверг, 30 июля 2015 - 4:06pm
    Тип новости:

    Banner by Ania of tiny stormtroopers putting out candles on a cake

    • The Daily Dot discussed Funimation's fanart stance with OTW Legal staffer Rebecca Tushnet. "'[I]t’s notable that there’s no mention of fair use...Fan art can be non-infringing fair use; elements of whether it is fair use include how transformative it is (how much new meaning and message it adds); whether it’s commercial or not; and whether it displaces a market for 'official' goods.' So it doesn't matter that they've declared they won't be going after commercially sold fanart? Not necessarily, according to Tushnet: 'It somewhat depends on what they actually do, but they are clearly claiming that fan art is in fact infringing copyright, even if they indicate they usually tolerate it. So I wouldn’t feel very reassured by this statement.'"
    • Perhaps JK Rowling's embrace of her fandom was key in a Fox Sports story about a fan whose fannishness influenced the University of Kentucky 2015 yearbook. "Towles has said that he's read each book in the series at least seven times and can 'quote the whole thing,' referring to the movies. And to take his fandom a step further, he annually celebrates Harry Potter's mythical birthday on July 31." The article concluded, "Harry Potter fan or not, you've got to appreciate the passion that led to...a yearbook titled 'Patrick Towles and the Order of Kentucky Football.'"
    • The Debrief reported on One Direction's new charity initiative, Action 1D. "Action1D is part of a brilliant wider campaign called Action/2015 which is all about the fact 2015 is the year loads of global issues begin to get resolved...What do Directioners need to do to save the world? Create pictures, videos, whatever, telling the boys what they want the future of the world to look like. Harry, Niall, Liam and Louis will then help put pressure on our leaders."
    • NPR featured a story on filmmaker Jennifer Nelson who is suing Warner/Chappell Music to make the song 'Happy Birthday' available for everyone. "If Nelson and her lawyers win, the song will be in the public domain. 'I think it's going to set a precedent for this song and other songs that may be claimed to be under copyright, which aren't," says [Nelson's lawyer]. As for Nelson, she jokes that if her lawsuit succeeds, 'People will be so sick of the 'Happy Birthday to You' song, because everybody will get to use it, finally.'"

    What fan charity efforts do you know about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fangirls in the Wild

    Опубликовал(а) Claudia Rebaza во вторник, 28 июля 2015 - 4:00pm
    Тип новости:

    Banner by Alice of the top of a face peering out from behind some leaves

    • San Diego Comic Con (SDCC) season means it's time for the media to once again declare that fangirls exist. The New York Times thought this was the year for fangirls. "A bunch of oddballs — nerds and fanboys, toy collectors and cosplayers, gamers and fantasists — invaded the mainstream and planted themselves at the vital center of the entertainment industry...Lately, though, something else has been happening, too — a shift in the ecosystem of fandom symbolized not only by Sadness but also by another new addition to the Comic-Con costume repertory: Imperator Furiosa, the crew-cut, one-armed avenger played by Charlize Theron in 'Mad Max: Fury Road.' Furiosa’s presence amid the Disney princesses and Manga pixies is an especially potent sign of the feminism that is a big part of this event."
    • A more thoughtful article at Refinery29 points out that SDCC is hardly a bastion of feminism yet. "What we’re calling fangirls here covers an admittedly wide and amorphous group of women. They’re cosplayers, comic book collectors, sci-fi nerds, steampunk enthusiasts, booth babes, Lolitas, and more....And they are vocal: When the proportion of female writers and artists for DC Comics plunged from 12 percent to 1 percent in 2011, female fans started a petition for DC to hire more women. DC Comics responded by promising to try. Female fans from a group called the Carol Corps. were also instrumental last year in pushing Marvel to announce plans for a movie about Captain Marvel, a super-powered woman. In other words, fangirls are engaged and numerous, making up a significant portion of the audience that shells out hard-earned dollars to support their pop culture passions. And yet, despite that, this group remains the third estate of the comics / fantasy world."
    • The Chicago Tribune focused more on numbers. "'But when you start to break it down according to how fans identify themselves, we find that no individual fandom is that even,' continues Salkowitz, who will discuss his findings Sunday afternoon at Comic-Con. 'Comics, videogaming, hobby gaming and toy collecting are majority male, usually in the 55- to 60-percent range. Manga/anime, science fiction/fantasy and media fandom are 60- to 65-percent female. Because today's big conventions appeal to fans of everything, audiences coming to shows are pretty much gender-balanced. However, it's still the case that, say, 'comics' fandom tends more toward older guys, whereas manga appeals more to younger women.'"
    • As Neon Tommy pointed out, having female creators representing female fans in the media is a needed step forward. "As for today’s devoted fangirls — who have often been excluded from the full participatory side of media — Jarett says the 'Fan Girl' film's message is one of female empowerment. 'Telulah is a filmmaker,' he says. 'And being a fan of something can also be someone’s art — it’s a form of creative expression.'"

    How many times have you been discovered within fandom? Write about your history in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Getting Canon

    Опубликовал(а) Katie в воскресенье, 26 июля 2015 - 4:01pm
    Тип новости:

    OTW Fannews Getting Canon

    • Forbes hosted an article about cartoon fandom in Zambia and the difficulty in obtaining canon. "'It’s literally impossible to find anime DVDs in stores here,' said Banda. 'Also, the last anime I saw in a Zambian cinema was [Studio Ghibli film] Ponyo. So yeah, access is pretty rough.' Even today, DVDs and BluRay are Zambians’ only legal options, as 'streaming legally is pretty much out of the question,' Banda said, referring to Crunchyroll, Funimation, and other websites’ region locking for much of Africa. Since the local currency, the Zambian kwacha, is weak compared to the Euro, fans often obtain anime through piracy when that’s all they can afford."
    • Science Fiction.com wrote about a donation to the OTW's partner institution, the University of Iowa. "73-year-old Allen Lewis spent the last 20 years collecting more than 17,000 books. Many of them are in the science fiction and fantasy realm as Lewis sought to rekindle his childhood love for those genres. Lewis has been a sci-fi fan since he was 12...Many of Lewis’ books are first editions and first printings. His collection includes 30,000 signatures from authors, editors and artists." Don't forget that the Open Doors project helps fans arrange donations of fannish memorabilia to the Iowa collection, so contact them with questions about your own collection!
    • NBC Philadelphia was among those profiling the local furry community "Ward, who helps organize the local group, didn't identify as a Furry until 2008, after she graduated from Marietta College in Ohio. Like many local Furries, she found her way into fandom through its anthropomorphic artwork. 'It's kind of an all-or-nothing thing,' she said. 'You start going, they drag you to the convention, and that's it, you're done.' Around Pennsylvania, Furries congregate on one online forum, www.pa-furry.org, and a handful of Facebook and Twitter groups. Anywhere between a dozen and a hundred Furries, friends and family show up to the local events, which become more frequent in the summer."
    • The New York Times hosted a discussion about fannish nostalgia. "Alas, I will never be 9 years old in 1987 ever again, and though it’s fun to romanticize the past, I don’t want to mistake fondness for excellence...Much like my friendships with the other members of my Full House Club, whom I sporadically see in my Facebook feed with their own 9-year-olds, my fandom seems unsustainable now. Better, then, to let the children of today discover and obsess about their own TV shows. Don’t remake the sweet smarm of our youth. I’ll be fine without it. I can always read up on some Uncle Jesse and Uncle Joey fan-fic if ever I’m feeling sentimental."

    What stories about fans and canon have you been part of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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