OTW Fannews: Do it yourself edition

  • TechDirt discussed the new site DMCAInjury.com, which was set up to keep track of bogus DMCA takedown requests. Those who file such claims could face punishment for those actions under section 512(f) of the DMCAbut so far it’s happened rarely and with difficulty. Keeping track of accidental or malicious takedown requests might spur more cases against those filing them, or “at the very least, perhaps it will create a useful dataset to explore the nature and frequency of bogus DMCA takedowns.”
  • The Daily Dot discussed the controversy over racist, homophobic, and sexist commentary found at GitHub, an open source code-sharing site used by many projects (including the AO3). “GitHub is a platform geeks and techies love because it not only lets you manage projects but allows you to share your code and your projects with the outside world.” However, the sharing mentality doesn’t mean all users are welcome. “GitHub sits in the center of an Open Source community that has been dealing with heated ongoing controversy over its lack of diversity. In November, BritRuby, a Manchester conference of Ruby on Rails coders, was canceled after outrage broke out online at its all-male lineup of panelists.”
  • A post at TeleRead offered fans tips on formatting downloaded fanfic from Fanfiction.net and the AO3, noting that MOBI downloads from AO3 can create wide margins and non-functional tables of content. Flavorwire tips readers off to the availability of Giphy, a search engine for animated GIFs. “Even in the age of relatively mainstream blogs like What Should We Call Me, though, a glance at Giphy’s front page reveals that the site caters to the kind of dedicated fandoms that popularized the .GIF in the first place.”
  • Lastly, former Board member Francesca Coppa will be speaking at the Midwest Archives Conference on April 18 about the OTW’s work on the Fan Culture Preservation Project and the AO3. Her talk will discuss how fan works are “an alternative, subterranean literature and arts culture, and describe the many ways fans have worked over the years to distribute and preserve that culture through zine libraries, hand-coded on-line archives,[and] songtape circles.”

What tools do you think help keep fandom running? Tell us about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

2 thoughts to “OTW Fannews: Do it yourself edition”

  1. This sounds nitpicky, but could you include a blank return between each bullet point in future Fannews? It’s a lot easier on the eyes and reduces the “wall of text” feel. Thanks 😀

    1. You’ve hit on a problem we’ve been having for a while, which is the different ways in which our mirror sites display the same post (for example, if you see this post on Dreamwidth, it will have spaces — often too much space in fact). I’ll be passing this along to our Webmasters team to see what we can do to make this more consistent. Thanks!

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