OTW Fannews: Building on the Past

Building on the past text with hourglass image

  • Although many an article speculated about the future of Mad Men‘s characters, it was The Washington Post who looked into what would happen to the the fandom’s RPG twitter accounts. “[A]t least one Roger Sterling (@RogerSterlingNY) has no intention of quitting: ‘Yeah, I’ve got tons of thoughts. Writing Roger has been a big part of my life for years now. He’ll go on, spouting wisdom and snark.’ Sterling — who also tweets as one of the more active Peggy accounts (@PeggyOlsonMCWW) — plans to continue in character, noting the stellar tweets of @WillMcAvoyACN, a spot-on Twitter account based on the Jeff Daniels character from Aaron Sorkin’s HBO show, ‘The Newsroom,’ who regularly engages in political Twitter debates. One is tempted to believe that it’s actually the work of Sorkin himself.”
  • The Guardian looked at the evolution of fanzines. “’It’s a very pop thing, a fanzine that’s just about one artist – not to make it for any other reason than that it expresses a deep interest and focus on one person,’ says Chris Heath, the award-winning journalist who has written every issue of Literally. ‘While you could argue that it becomes more irrelevant in the internet era, I think it also becomes maybe of more worth, because one of the great things – and great problems – about the internet is that it’s boundless. And there’s something great in opposition to that about seven inches by five inches. It’s a pure, perfect little package of one particular part of pop culture.’”
  • The World aired a piece on the constant reinvention of Sherlock Holmes, with attention to the role of fanworks. “[W]e also have an entirely different genre of Sherlock being produced almost by the minute — one created entirely by fans. ‘Fan fiction is fascinating because it’s being written in almost every language,’ says Dundas. ‘There’s this incredible, sort of prismatic view of character provided by fan fiction that is something that we’ve never really seen before and I think is an intriguing new direction for how a character could evolve through popular culture.'”(No transcript available)
  • The Daily Mail featured the Finnish fans behind Fangirl Quest, a global sceneframes project. Various images were included of their iPads aligned with backdrops featuring famous characters from famous TV and movie canons. Clearly the Daily Mail lacked any fans of its own working on the article, however, as they captioned a photo of Kirk and Spock walking near the Golden Gate bridge as a “Star Wars scene in San Francisco.”

What parts of fandom seem eternal to you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

One thought to “OTW Fannews: Building on the Past”

  1. There’s this incredible, sort of prismatic view of character provided by fan fiction that is something that we’ve never really seen before and I think is an intriguing new direction for how a character could evolve through popular culture.

    That rather highlights a lack of literary education amongst journalists, social commentators, etc. Haven’t they come across all the works that brought us Arthur, Robin Hood, Greek heroes, Roman emperors? Nobody called them fanfiction but they were certainly part of popular culture, and equally certainly helped to evolve characters. We should be stressing the roots of fanworks, not merely celebrating the current manifestations.

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