Fan Conventions

  • Events Calendar for January

    By Kiri Van Santen on vendredi, 1 January 2016 - 8:18pm
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    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Fans of Sherlock Holmes have a lot to celebrate this month. The BBC!Sherlock fandom has been eagerly awaiting The Abominable Bride, which finally airs tonight, 1 January, in both the UK and US.
    • This special episode will be set in Victorian London and will stand alone.

    • Sherlock Holmes's birthday is commonly celebrated on 6 January, although Sir Arthur Conan Doyle never specified the date.
    • Will you be honouring the great detective on the sixth? Let us know in the comments!

    • The Baker Street Irregulars (BSI) are holding their annual Baker Street Irregulars and Friends Weekend 14-16 January in New York City. The event is open to the public, excluding a special dinner exclusively for BSI members.
    • More of a sci-fi buff than a Sherlockian? National Science Fiction Day is an unofficial holiday is marked by some sci-fi fans in the United States. It is celebrated on Isaac Asimov's birthday, 2 January, and is beginning to be noted on many calendars.

    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Museums of Faith

    By Cat Goodfellow on jeudi, 17 December 2015 - 6:11pm
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    A statue of a person holds up a Fannews sign while two others hold up a banner reading Museums of Faith

    • A write-up at Patheos reported on several papers presented on fandom and religion. "We see there, and in Star Trek fandom's rejection of a sexist interpretation of 'Turnabout Intruder,' examples of liberal or liberationist prooftexting. Historicism is used selectively in the service of constructing an imaginal world. Raphael mentioned wanting to teach a course that imagines that a religion has been constructed around Star Trek, without some of the evidence that we have, in order to illustrate what happens in interpretation and imaginal world construction."
    • A writer at The Christian Century looked to find similar connections at a fan con and came to a different conclusion. "Sociologist and media theorist Stig Hjar­vard argues that citizens of postindustrial societies find the most significant experiences of enchantment in pop culture. In his studies of Danish culture, fantasy texts like Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, and the Chronicles of Nar­nia were eight times more likely to be named significant in shaping moral and spiritual ideas than the Bible or other traditional religious texts. This is why I went to Comic Con: to learn about the religious nones or those who find their religion in hobbit costumes and manga fan clubs. Then I found the panels, the sub­terranean heart of Comic Con, in the basement of the convention center. The panels revealed Comic Con as less alternative religious gathering and more professional convention."
    • The Cincinnati Art Museum is among those who understand the importance of fandom commerce, and it's begun a series to capitalize on it. "Fandom, a new monthly gallery conversation, aims to bring together fans of art and popular culture in a playful and humorous exploration of the Art Museum’s galleries. Each month, a different pop culture topic will inspire an interactive tour in the permanent collection. Join us this month as we explore the connections between the CAM collection and a galaxy far, far away with our resident Star Wars expert Anne Buening."
    • The Guardian hosted an opinion piece about the overlap of high art and pop culture. "Critics...have suggested that Griffiths’s exhibition isn’t about Murray per se, but is a way for the artist to explore a number of concepts – including scale and the relative status of people and objects...It’s all wonderful theorising – but when it comes down to brass tacks, don’t Griffiths et al just simply love Murray? Crafting an entire exhibition around his image could be thought of as an extension of doodling his name on your notebook or cutting pictures of him out of a magazine and putting them in a scrapbook."

    How does fandom and fanwork cross over into other cultural spaces? Tell us about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for November

    By Kiri Van Santen on dimanche, 1 November 2015 - 7:21pm
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    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    Wizard World, famous for running huge conventions across North America, has two cons this month. The Louisville con is being held from 6–8 November, and features Stephen Amell, Ben McKenzie, Bruce Campbell. Reno Wizard Con runs from 20 November to the 22nd (Fri-Sat-Sun) and features geek celebs like Kevin Smith and Jason Mewes, Adam West and Burt Ward, and Adventure Time's Jeremy Shada!

    FANdom Con 'is a predominantly anime based convention that also caters to fans of comics, video games and sci-fi.' This year's event will be held at the Emerald Coast Convention Center in Fort Walton Beach from 6-8 November.

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Fixing Fails

    By Pip Janssen on mardi, 27 October 2015 - 5:00pm
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    Black and white band aid with text saying fandom fixing fails

  • Black Girl Nerds hosted a discussion about race bending fanart, and its importance in increasing representation. "To behold an Aurora, with dark skin and a wide nose like mine, is an act of revolution. Her adornment of pigmented skin and black long locs is revolutionary. Her full lips signify the coveted trait possessed by numerous Black women like me. A brown Rapunzel, wrapped in a marigold sari is revolutionary. Her defiant brown skin distinctively pairs with a gold barrette in her long mane. These crucial depictions remind women and people of color of their beauty, existence and visibility."
  • The Toronto Star brought the Cosplay is not Consent discussion to a wider audience. "Similar signs have cropped up at conventions across North America, including New York Comic Con and Fan Expo Dallas. Organizers of Toronto’s expo, which wrapped up a four-day run at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on Sunday, say it’s a sign of the times, but not a political statement...Discussions about consent and victim-blaming are a movement outside the convention world, too. Ontario’s new sex-ed curriculum includes lessons on consent in the primary grades."
  • The Daily Dot profiled a new film about a male slash writer and discussed the negative reaction to it in many fanfic communities. "'[Y]our pitch looks like one more male indie auteur trying to make his name off of the backs of women,' wrote slasher and filmmaker Franzeska Dickson in response to the Kickstarter campaign...The cultural pattern of erasing women from their own stories and histories they created for themselves is a long one, and fandom is no exception: An infamous episode of Supernatural—one of the most female-dominated fandoms around—once portrayed a Supernatural fan convention within the show as almost entirely male-centric...Although slash writers focus primarily on male characters and many actively advocate for queer representation in media, queer men don't actually make up a large part of the slash community."
  • Metro's list of 21 things only fans would understand was lighthearted but didn't overlook problematic issues such as fandom battles and a lack of perspective. Also noticed was the lack of perspective from outside observers. "You do get judged for getting so into something. Football fans who cry over their team losing are ‘passionate’. Coronation Street fans who cry over their favourite character dying are ‘sad losers’. How does THAT work?"

What fails have you seen fandom fixing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Big Business Selfies

    By Janita Burgess on dimanche, 25 October 2015 - 4:32pm
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    OTW Fannews banner with the text Big Business Selfies against a background of stacked silver coins

    • Here and Now did a segment on how important the Twilight film had become to the economy of the town it's set in. Focusing on the 10th anniversary celebration of Twilight's publication, the segment interviews citizens of Forks, Washington and discusses the events taking place. (No transcript available)
    • At Publishing Technology the economic impact of fanfiction is in focus. "[T]he way that fan fiction takes a piece of Intellectual Property and chops it up, plays with it and distributes it over multiple networks and media...is a very pure expression of the kind of creative approach to content exploitation that we at Publishing Technology have been talking to publishers about for a very long time. The possibilities opened up by digital media mean that the book is often only the beginning of the commercial life of a piece of IP. Yet it still remains the only focus of many publishers, who find it conceptually and practically difficult to unbundle the book and sell it as chapters, or a serial, or even a content marketing campaign paid for by a brand advertiser. The book is treated as the end-product of the publishing process, when it could be just the beginning."
    • Film School Rejects discussed how fandom documentaries are becoming a form of fandom selfie. "Other than that, Ghostheads doesn’t seem to have much of a reason to exist. Like too many other fandom docs, it’s not likely to reach or be appealing to the millions of non-extreme fans let alone total outsiders. It will tell a number of hardcore Ghostbusters fans things they already know about themselves and their beloved movie...I also wouldn’t be surprised if the studios start encouraging, maybe even secretly contributing to the crowdfunding of docs that in turn foster and support fans and enthusiasm for their upcoming slates. If nothing else, they might later on be cheap pickups to throw onto their Blu-ray releases of the original or new version of their respective properties."
    • Alaska Dispatch News mapped the growth of Senshi con "from [a school] cafeteria to UAA and in recent years mushrooming into an expansive convention housed in the Egan Center. Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Bundick and other organizers are expecting more than 4,000 attendees, and Alaska Business Monthly is predicting it will produce an economic impact of $191,000" with the growth likely to continue. Its organizer said “We’re still getting [vendor and artist] applications for this year. This is the first time we’ve had a waiting list...Local people and businesses are wanting to get in on it."

    What sorts of economic and business growth have you seen tied to fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for October

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on jeudi, 1 October 2015 - 1:14pm
    Message type:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Ladiesbingo is a bingo challenge for creative works about the relationships between women. It runs for seven months (from September until March). Players create works to fill squares in a bingo card and gain points for the patterns they make. When the challenge ends in March winners are announced based on the number of points amassed.
    • ConClave is an annual convention "dedicated to education and literacy through the advancement of Science Fiction." The guest of honor is Jody Lynn Nye, author of over 40 books including the recent Fortunes of the Imperium and Wishing On a Star. Programming tracks include science, music, literature, and gaming, with a special new track this year called "Mystery and Mayhem." Room parties are encouraged, and all registered hosts will receive a Party Starter Kit. The con is October 9-11 in Dearborn, Michigan, United States.
    • Octocon, the National Irish Science Fiction Convention, is a "weekend celebration of the weird and wonderful, attracting artists, writers, film-makers and fans from across the human sphere of influence." This year's guests of honor are authors Maura McHugh and Emma Newman. It is October 9-12 in Dublin, Ireland.
    • GeekGirlCon gives female geeks and their supporters the opportunity to build a community, share facts and fandom, and learn how they can help promote the role of women and other underrepresented groups in geek culture. It's October 10-11, Seattle, Washington, United States.
    • You've probably seen the fake It's Back to the Future Day posts online for years, but--guess what--October 21, 2015, is the real thing. It's finally the actual day Marty McFly visited in the second movie of the time-travel trilogy.
    • Author and artist signups close October 27 for the Clint Barton Big Bang. Stories must be at least 20,000 words long and focus on the Marvel character. Betas also are needed!
    • TusCon 42 is, unsurprisingly, hosted in Tucson and describes itself as "the best little sci-fi, fantasy, and horror convention in Arizona." Guests of honor are author Seanan Mcguire (October Daye, InCryptid) and fantasy artist Bridget E. Wilde. TusCon will include a burlesque show in addition to a cosplay contest and pet parade. TusCon is October 30-November 1.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Call for Papers: Moomin Collection. The Moomins, created by Tove Jansson, have delighted and enlightened adults and children for generations and have been translated into several languages. In all, nine books were published, together with five picture books and a comic strip, between 1945 and 1993. At the centennial anniversary of their creator’s birth, a new film has been released, and more of Jansson’s works are now being translated from Swedish into various other languages. This has created a second "Moomin boom." Contributions of 5,000 words are being sought, with abstracts of up to 500 words due by October 30.
    • Call For Papers: Virtual/Physical Fan Spaces for Special Edition of the Journal of Fandom Studies. Fan spaces are increasingly important culturally and financially. Media creators and producers have come to acknowledge the significance of their fans and the need to communicate with them, particularly through social media. Fans, however, also insist upon their own self-contained spaces where they can share their opinions and observations, as well as their transformative works, metatexual analyses, and cosplay. Papers on virtual and physical fan spaces are being sought for a proposed special edition of the Journal of Fandom Studies. Abstracts are due November 1.
    • Call for Papers: Stardom and Fandom, Southwest Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference. Submit proposals for papers or multipaper panels on Stardom and Fandom by November 1 for the 37th Annual Southwest Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference. The conference is scheduled for February 10-13, 2016, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States. Monetary awards will be granted for the best graduate papers.

    Help out a researcher!

    Lisa Gaumond ia a doctoral student in Media Psychology at Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, California. She is studying "television viewing and self-discrepancy," and is asking for participants to take a survey describing themselves and their television viewing habits. Participation is anonymous, and survey participants will not receive additional contact. The entire survey should take about 19 minutes to complete. Find the survey online. Participants may submit an email to receive a copy of the dissertation when it is complete. If you have questions about the survey, contact Gaumond at lisaga-at-mit-dot-edu or the Institutional Review Board at 805-898-4034 or IRB-at-fielding-dot-IRB.

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • Transformative Works and Cultures Releases Issue No. 20

    By Sarah Remy on mardi, 15 September 2015 - 4:15pm
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    20th Issue celebration banner with separate icons for letters, vids, conventions, zines, usenet, blogs, and moblie. Red heading Twentieth Issue Celebration

    Transformative Works and Cultures has released their 20th issue. This milestone issue showcases the interdisciplinary nature of the field of fan studies and, as editors Kristina Busse and Karen Hellekson write: "offers us a moment to reflect on where we've come and where we want to go."

    The first collaboration between Busse and Hellekson, "which was conceived in early 2004 and began soliciting contributions in September 2004, moved quickly: essays were submitted and peer reviewed, and we received a publishing contract with an estimated print date of September 2005. Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet would not be published for another few months, but we had accomplished what we had set out to do: give voice to the many scholars we had met at conferences and online; create a volume that would start with the premise that academics were often fans and fans often academics and that that was okay; and permit conversations that did not always begin with introductory definitions but instead would assume a knowledgeable audience, thus raising the level of discourse."

    Ten years later, the Journal of Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC) continues to do just that.

    Fandoms addressed in the 20th issue include bronies (Anne Gilbert); Columbine shooters Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold (Andrew Ryan Rico); the 2010 film The Social Network (Melanie Piper); and Lady Gaga (Lise Dilling-Hansen).

    Essays also discuss the genre of mpreg (Mary Ingram-Waters); the use of African American cultural studies in fan studies (Rebecca Wanzo); and pedagogy (Misty Krueger). Two essays discuss comic books, one with a focus on materiality (J. Richard Stevens and Christopher E. Bell) and the other with a focus on Japanese fan comics (Kathryn Hemmann). Materiality is also addressed in an essay about one-sixth-scale action figures (Victoria Godwin).

    Symposium essays include personal essays about being of fan of singer Patti Smith (Maud Lavin) and about creative winter fashions made in in a Nunavik village in Quebec (Jasmin Aurora Stoffer). Another essay discusses fan recuts of films or film series (Joshua Wille).

    The issue concludes with three reviews of recent books in the field of fan studies.


    The next issue of TWC, No. 21, will appear in March 2016 as a special issue guest edited by Ika Willis on the Classical Canon and/as Transformative Work.

    The following issues are open for submissions (close date March 15, 2016): open, unthemed issue; Sherlock Holmes Fandom, Sherlockiana, and the Great Game; and Queer Female Fandom. The calls for papers for the themed issues are available on TWC's website.

  • OTW Fannews: OTW Sightings

    By Janita Burgess on mardi, 8 September 2015 - 4:31pm
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    OTW Fannews banner by Ania Kopertowska with a picture of a viewfinder overlooking a river with the words OTW Sightings

    • Members of OTW's Legal Committee have proposed panels for next year's South By Southwest (SXSW) conference on fair use and fandom. They are asking for fans to support the inclusion of these panels by either logging in to the SXSW official website and upvoting a session on its info page, or by commenting via Disqus on that session’s info page. The panels are Copyright & Creators: 2026 and FYeahCopyright and Fanworks.
    • MediaPost discussed when and how creators should try to target fans in order to help promote a project. "The first thing entertainment marketers should do when looking to harness the power of fandoms is to understand what makes them tick...Go beyond the obvious appeal of a TV show – the characters, plot lines and themes – and dig into the details and nuances such as vernacular, recurring motifs and magical moments that empower fans and make them feel like part of something bigger."
    • Gizmodo provided a lengthy look at AO3 features as part of offering a guide to the "best fanfiction" available. One thing not mentioned were bookmark searches and the rec feature. However the post did mention how "[u]sers on Tumblr, Livejournal and other networks will often curate 'recs' pages of what they consider the best stories. So if the sorting options on AO3 aren’t enough, do a web search for a pairing or fandom and related recommendations, like 'harry potter fic recs.' Individual, dedicated archives in the older style still exist as well."

    What OTW sightings have you seen around the web? If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for September 2015

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on mardi, 1 September 2015 - 3:39pm
    Message type:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of September! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • If you're a Star Wars collector, mark your calendars. If you're Star Wars weary, you may want to avoid toy retailers on September 4, which Disney, Lucasfilm, and other Star Wars merchandisers are calling Force Friday, the day Star Wars: The Force Awakens tie-in materials officially go on sale.
    • FandomVerse Expo is a three-day multi-fandom convention. Its goal is to enlighten, inform, and entertain attendees while celebrating all areas of fandom: anime, comics, sci-fi, horror, fantasy, gaming, costuming, and more. It's September 4-6 in Lancaster, California, United States.
    • Gleekon 2015 is the first unofficial Glee convention hosted in Italy. The three-day event, September 4-6 in Milan, includes meet-and-greets with the guests, Q&A panels, individual and group photo opportunities, and autograph sessions. Dot Marie Jones is a special guest.
    • It's the first annual Scifi Wales convention, being held in the seaside town of Llandudno, Wales, United Kingdom, on September 5. Special guests include Caitlin Blackwood (Doctor Who), Virginia Hey (Farscape), Brian Wheeler (Star Wars and Harry Potter), and John Challis (Doctor Who). Attendees can also learn to make 3D paper toys with "Jedi Paper Master" Ryan Hall.

    • The goal of Alamo City Comic Con is "to celebrate the artists who provide entertainment to the public via comics, movies, TV, gaming, and cosplay." This year's special guests include John Noble, Edward James Olmos, Ron Perlman, and Manu Bennett. Photo ops will be available, and the event, September 11-13 in San Antonio, Texas, United States, will include a costume contest.
    • Shocka-Con 4, a horror/scifi convention, will feature Rose Siggins and Drew Rin Varick from American Horror Story; Bai Ling (The Crow, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow); and Jeryl Prescott from The Walking Dead. The event is September 18-20 in Charleston, West Virginia, United States.
    • Hobbit Day! September 22 is the shared birthday of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins, and it was officially declared a holiday by the American Tolkien Society in 1978.

    • Submit drafts for the Captain America/Iron Man Big Bang by September 23. Stories should focus on the relationship between Steve Rogers and Tony Stark (in any setting or continuity you can think of). Artist claims will be based on fic summaries, which will be made available beginning September 24. Minimum final word count for stories is 25,000, and final fics are due November 1. Authors are required to post their own works to an Archive of Our Own collection.
    • FACTS (Fantasy Anime Comics Toys Space), September 26-27 in Ghent, Belgium, is a forum for all fans of the “fantastic genre." Guests include Casper Van Dien (Starship Troopers) and Sylvester McCoy (Doctor Who, The Hobbit) and a wide variety of international and local artists. Highlights include a game zone and a fan village.
    • The annual conference of the Midwest Popular Culture Association and Midwest American Culture Association, MPCA in Cincinnati will feature presentations on topics including fandom studies, gender studies, writing and rhetoric in popular culture, and more. It's October 1-4 in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Going Viral: The Changing Faces of (Inter)Media Culture. As the practice of sharing texts, images, and videos online provokes and multiplies reactions on a global scale, it can be defined as contagious—enabling any possible content to “go viral.” The 2015 fall issue of Frames will explore the palpable effects of this "contagiousness" on media culture. Topics may include but are not limited to the influence of New Media on low budget / no budget filmmaking and studio advertising strategies; piracy and copyright issues; and online film reception and its influence on fan culture. In addition to articles, video submissions are welcome. All submissions should be sent by September 14.
    • Fanfiction in Medieval Studies, a Panel at the International Congress on Medieval Studies. Over the past three decades, there has been increasing interest in both Fan Studies and Medieval Studies in the relationship between medieval literary culture and fanfiction (that is, popular, "unofficial," fan-generated fiction writing that participates in a pre-existing fictional "universe" and uses its characters). This session invites papers that reflect on points of analogy between fanfiction and medieval literatures. Abstracts of 300 words or less and a Participation Information Form are due September 15.
    • An Edited Collection on the Work of Joni Mitchell. Joni Mitchell is widely recognised as an innovative, influential, much-loved, and much-imitated artist. From her debut album Song to a Seagull to her most recent Shine, Mitchell’s music--her tunings, her lyrics, her scope--has drawn critical and popular acclaim. And yet, scholarly attention to her work has been relatively limited. This edited collection will attend to Mitchell as a figure worthy of sustained critical thought and appreciation, with a major publisher having already expressed interest. Please send 350- to 500-word chapter proposals by September 30.
    • Fan Culture and Theory, Popular Culture Association National Conference. The Popular Culture Association National Conference takes place March 21-25 in Seattle, Washington. Proposals for both panels and individual papers are now being accepted for all aspects of Fan Culture and Theory, including, but not limited to, the following areas: Fan Fiction; Fan/Creator interactions; Race, Gender and Sexuality in Fandom; Music Fandom; and Reality Television Fandom. Submit abstracts of 100-250 words with relevant audio/visual requests online by October 1. Graduate students are encouraged to submit proposals.

    Help out a researcher!

    This month we have received a request for research participation from Silja Kukka at University of Oulu, Finland. As part of her research for her PhD, she is studying kink meme communities under the oversight of Dr. Kuisma Korhonen.

    The purpose of this research is to study kink meme communities and their place in the larger context of pornography and contemporary porn studies, and to study the role that slash fiction plays in the development of humans' sexual identity.

    Note that survey participants must be at least 18 years of age. You can find the survey online.

    Contact information is kinkmeme [dot] survey [at] gmail [dot] com and kuisma [dot] korhonen [at] oulu [dot] fi.

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Tourism

    By Claudia Rebaza on dimanche, 2 August 2015 - 3:01pm
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    Banner by Alice of a road sign reading OTW Fannews: Fandom Tourism and a dotted path from a compass to an X

    • Media outlets have been engaged in 'fandom tourism' articles for some time. Although there are fewer articles these days demonstrating surprise that fandom or fanworks exist, there are still a number of fandom profiles that either serve to stoke fandom nostalgia by pointing out activity surrounding a particular canon, or by demonstrating surprise that works exist in a specific fandom. Some recent examples were run in Jezebel, Flavorwire, and The New York Times.
    • While the spate of fandom tourism articles may have been inspired by San Diego Comic Con (SDCC), other articles involved SDCC directly. In a post at Belief Net, Nell Minow discussed her participation in the San Diego Comic Con panel Fandom: The Next Generation. "We all dream of sharing our passions with our children. But it is important to be careful about it. Everyone on the panel had a story about sharing the wrong movie — or the right movie too soon — with a child who got upset, and feeling that we had 'flunked parenting.' Young children will say what they think you want to hear and if it seems too important to you, they will tell you they like something when they really do not."
    • NPR talked with screenwriter Nicole Perlman, who discussed her excitement at seeing fans of her next project. "Perlman says she got very excited the first time she saw someone dressed up as her new project, Captain Marvel. 'She looked fantastic, so I completely accosted her and I kind of whispered it shyly, 'I'm writing the movie, take a picture with me please!'"
    • Polygon contrasted the approaches of Marvel and Warner Bros when fans promoted their new projects. "When trailers leaked from Comic Con, because studios show things to huge halls of people who are all carrying recording equipment and still think they can control the footage, the response from Warner Bros. was, to put it mildly, messed up." Writer Ben Kuchera concluded, "The reaction to the Suicide Squad footage was mostly positive; this was a great thing for Warner Bros. until they had to stomp in and make sure we knew they didn't approve of the way we were excited about their product and everyone needs to cut it out at once or they'll turn this movie right around and drive home."

    What articles could your write about your fandoms? Don't wait! Post them to Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.