This Week in Fandom

This Week in Fandom, Volume 134

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things that are happening. Before we get started on everyone’s strong opinions about film and TV, we thought we’d let you know that the musical Hamilton is going to be screened in cinemas! Are you excited to finally get to see it, or did you manage to catch it live? Let us know in the comments!


This awards season, there’s been a spotlight on the Oscars for allowing us all to seamlessly repurpose last year’s hashtag #OscarsSoWhite – both because Cynthia Erivo, lead actress in Harriet, is the only person of colour to be nominated in any of the acting categories, and because everyone is waiting to see whether the overwhelmingly white Academy will leave Parasite in the Best International Feature Film category. Which was named Best Foreign Film until… this year.

Bong Joon-Ho has given several iconic interviews recently, telling Vulture that the Oscars are “not an international film festival. They’re very local”, speaking to Vanity Fair about his anxiety and how much he loves his wife, and receiving his BAFTA award with the message that “Once you overcome the one-inch-tall barrier of subtitles, you will be introduced to so many more amazing films.”. The media world is alight with speculation about whether Parasite will receive the wins it deserves – and perhaps if it does win, your UK-based blogger can finally find a showing in cinemas. Read More

Celebrate the End of our Three-Year Strategic Plan

Celebrate the End of our Three-Year Strategic Plan!

In January of 2017, the OTW embarked on its first-ever strategic plan. The purpose of a strategic plan is to guide the overall direction of the organization: to define what we want to achieve and how we want to pursue it. A strategic plan is a staple of nonprofits and for-profit businesses alike, and for the OTW it was especially important as we moved from being a small start-up to a growing organization with a lot of moving parts and a Hugo Award-winning project.

We have now made it three full years, working really hard to make this strategic plan a success. As we close out this plan and look forward to the future, we would like to share with you some highlights of what this strategic plan has helped the OTW accomplish.

What did the OTW’s first Strategic Plan do for the organization?

For individual committees:

All (or almost all) OTW committees now know and have documented:

  • What the committee’s role is within the organization (purview statements)
  • What the expectations are for their chair, and how to train a new chair (chair/lead position descriptions and training plans)
  • How to get and train new staff (recruitment plans)
  • How to figure out and communicate how much money they need per year (budgets)
  • What their goals are for the near future and how they intend to accomplish them (roadmaps)
  • What the regular, ongoing work of their committee is and how to accomplish it (internal wiki pages)

For the Board:

The strategic plan has supported the Board in:

  • Clarifying the duties of a Board member and Board Officer (purview and roles documentation)
  • Laying out how to introduce new Board members to the information they need (Board training plan)
  • Discussing the future of the OTW’s leadership structure, and creating some proposals for how to improve it (Research governance options and new operations model plan)

For the whole organization:

The strategic plan has supported the OTW as a whole in creating:

  • Annual budgets
  • Clear financial policies that are in line with best practices for nonprofits
  • Goals for how much money we should have in reserve, and what we want our fundraising drives to accomplish
  • A process that our projects can use to set goals for the future and document their accomplishments
  • A report on volunteer opinions on OTW-wide meetups, currently under discussion by the Board

Thank You!

OTW volunteers all worked together on these goals, and our work is made possible by the donations and support of our members and users.

A big thank you to all OTW volunteers and stakeholders!

This Week in Fandom

This Week in Fandom, Volume 133

Hello and welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things that are happening. Before we get started, did you see io9‘s interview with The Witcher creator Andrzej Sapkowski? It’s chock-full of entertaining content, perhaps the most relatable of which is Sapkowski’s acknowledgment that he wasn’t very involved in the development of the Netflix show because ‘I do not like working too hard or too long’. We feel you, buddy. Did you enjoy the interview? Let us know in the comments!


And now: those based in the UK, as is your friendly OTW comms blogger, may feel that they’ve heard quite enough about Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s decision to leave the royal family. On the other hand, there’s a fandom perspective on everything. That’s the tack which journalist Eleanor Peake took this week in an article for the New Statesman, which explores the ways that Meghan and Harry’s departure from the British royal family has impacted “royal-watchers” online. Peake interviews Reese, who runs a royal family podcast, explores fan communities on Tumblr and Facebook, and begins to ask some interesting questions about the relationship between celebrity fandom and what’s essentially RPF. The article also notes that responses to Meghan (both before and after the announcement of the split) are often underpinned by ‘racist’ commentary that takes a toll on black and mixed-race fans. ‘We’ve just been telling each other to take breaks and protect our mental health,’ Reese says. Read More