OTW 10th Anniversary Chat

Transcript of the 10th Anniversary Chat with Lev Grossman

If you missed any of our posts or events celebrating our 10th anniversary, or want to attend future events, check out our announcement post. Below is the transcript for the chat held on September 9th.

The transcript has been edited for arrivals and departures in the room, greetings from the audience, and moderator instructions.


Hello and welcome! As advertised, the Organization for Transformative Works is running a series of chats during the month of September in celebration of our 10th anniversary. Today’s chat focuses on Book & TV Fandom! A transcript will be made public later today.

I’m your moderator, Janita Burgess, and I’m a co-chair of the OTW’s Communications Committee. We have some prepared questions for our guest and then we’ll be opening the floor to audience questions.

Today’s guest is author Lev Grossman. You can check out his bio by following the links on our announcement post.

Lev, as this event is part of the OTW’s 10th anniversary celebration, we thought we’d get things started by asking you some questions about your last 10 years! First off, what do you like to look back on as your major achievement(s) since 2007?

*levgrossman
Mmmm … bracketing the personal achievements (getting married, having two kids) the most important thing I did in the past 10 years — kind of obviously — is publish The Magicians in 2009.

At that point I was 20 years into my writing career without really making much noise, so finally having a success changed everything for me

Janita Burgess
It certainly did start something pretty big.

*levgrossman
Now that it’s been a clue on Jeopardy I feel like I can mostly sit back and coast

Janita Burgess
Hahaha, awesome

*levgrossman
(though for perspective, I didn’t actually quit my day at Time magazine till last December)

Janita Burgess
I think most writers have received that advice. 😉

*levgrossman
(sorry, that was ‘day job’)

Janita Burgess
No worries. This chat platform doesn’t allow for editing, so typos get made. Secondly, what do you remember about fandom from back in 2007, how aware were you of it?

*levgrossman
That’s a good question. So much has changed since then.

I’ve always been aware of it to some extent. Being a SFF fan and growing up near Boston, Boskone was always a looming presence. Ditto, for an avid Dragon magazine subscriber, I always knew GenCon was going on somewhere out there.

But I’ve never been a hugely social fan — I’m a shy person and I rarely got near conventions, except to cover them as a journalist, and that was mostly just Comic-Con

And then social media was still just a baby in 2007 — I mean I was on Usenet in the 90s but social media made fandom visible to me in a way it never had been before

It wasn’t till The Magicians came out that I really properly engaged with it — I was at the first LeakyCon in 2009, and Azkaban, and WorldCon that year. And I got on Twitter

I started to understand some of its social forms and how they related to how creative works live in our culture

Jemma H.
LeakyCon!

Jack A.
really?

Janita Burgess
Fandom certainly does have its own social forms. Conventions are interesting and fun ways to learn them. And I’m sure joining Twitter was quite the experience. =)

*levgrossman
Sorry, not Azkaban, Azkatraz!

Janita Burgess
Hahaha, small difference. What things have you been excited to see in recent years, either regarding fandom or work in your genre(s)?

*levgrossman
Two big questions

I guess one of the most exciting things for me has been watching a new generation encounter fanfiction and fanworks in general

I’ve always been conscious of coming to them as kind of an outsider — speaking them as a second language but for my daughter, who’s 13, fanworks are where she lives. that’s how she discovers new things that she loves — they’re not really that separate from the works they’re derived from — it’s just a natural thing for her

she’s obsessed with Night Vale; there’s a lot of Night Vale/Portal crossover stuff; now she plays Portal obsessivesly; it’s how she navigates the culture

I’ve always felt like our culture/marketplace kind of fetishizes the idea of originality — if you have an idea, or you can claim an idea, it’s your property, no one else can touch it — her ideas of originality are so much more fluid and complex

characters and stories just flow from creator to creator, medium to medium … it’s cool

Janita Burgess
(Your daughter sounds fun!)

*levgrossman
words/games/music/images/Lego … they’re all kind of part of a big ecosystem in a way I don’t remember from my childhood

Not that I necessarily see that reflected in the fantasy genre. The Magicians is kind of semi-overtly intertextual in nature … I don’t see a ton of other writers playing that game

but there’s hugely interesting stuff happening, no question

Jemma H.
What drew you to this kind of trope-conscious urban fantasy?

Janita Burgess
Can we table that question for after the prepared questions, if you don’t mind? =)

Let’s move on to questions more specific to your own work, Lev.

The Magicians was published in 2009, the better part of a decade ago. It also has a spiritual precursor in the character Hollis from your 1997 book Warp, though the books are quite different in many ways. The television show The Magicians also makes some significant changes from your books. In what ways has the passage of time affected the state of this character/story for you? Does each version stand as its own static thing to you, or do they continue to evolve in your mind? Would you write another different version of Hollis/Quentin if you wrote the books today?

*levgrossman
They couldn’t reconcile them — reality was unendurable and the fantasy world was evanescent/unreal/unreachable

At the risk of getting too personal, that was a problem that I foundered on for about the first half of my life — my brain was both overactive and super-depressed — resulting in near-total stasis in my actual life

Writing The Magicians was a way for me of working that through, coming to terms with the fact that, basically, that Hogwarts invite was never coming

Which is a long way of getting to saying that I probably couldn’t really write another Quentin/Hollis figure

If I wrote the story today I think Quentin would probably be a bit more self-aware about his narcissism which is the unappealing flip side of depression

Janita Burgess
Ah, yes. Characters do tend to grow as writers grow.

*levgrossman
By the end of The Magician’s Land — to put it as unspoilerishly as possible — Quentin has (hopefully) evolved to a different place. My therapist thought Quentin should give up magic, or possibly he should wake up and it was all a dream.

I went a different way with it

And now in a kind of Sisyphean way TV-Quentin has to go through it all over again

Janita Burgess
Next question for you, Lev.
You wrote an article about hiding yourself away to write and be a loner genius, and how that went very badly.

Fans frequently write in very social contexts, soliciting feedback from each other at every stage, incorporating suggestions into their future works, and writing stories specifically for requests made by their readers. How do you feel this practice would work in a professional writing context? Is there a maximum benefit to a writing community as a professional, when you have to worry about things like copyright? Or is it a matter of the the further you can get from being a solo auteur, the better?

*levgrossman

Writing is unquestionably a social activity. For me and most writers. I’m sure there are those who can do it in isolation, but I’m pretty sure they’re outliers

Per the Buzzfeed essay, this was a difficult lesson for me to learn. Writing is a form of communication — you have to have people on the other side, and the more feedback (up to a hypotethical point of failure) the better

Stilinski
Oh I see 🙂

*levgrossman
I still don’t have a regular circle of fellow writers, which is kind of crazy b/c I live in Brooklyn NY where every third person is a writer

Stilinski
Writing as a profession is surely different >.<

Rose
Interesting

*levgrossman
But I use beta readers! A practice I obvs learned from fan fiction

Valentina M.
I see.

Stilinski
XD Beta readers

Janita Burgess
Love your beta readers. <3

Jana
😀

Jazmyn S.
Gotta love the beta

*levgrossman
I’m sure there’s a point where the level of feedback brings on legal issues — when you’re charging money for your work — but I haven’t got there yet. happily.

I do find the level of feedback over social media occasionally stifling — you catch yourself being hypercritical, or doing deliberate fan service, and losing touch with your inner voices

there’s a limit to how much you can internalize and still feel a sense of personal integrity as a writer

Barb
Some fan fiction derives from research but also experience and lets people discover things about themselves and that can be really valuable. I speak from my experience as a reader.

Shelley
Where do you get your inspiration to write the stories and such grand world building?

Hojaverde
Fan service… so true

Stilinski
Social Media has many kinds of feedback

Rose
What do you do when you get authors block?

*levgrossman
interestingly I’ve been doing some work as a screenwriter, which is even another kind of ballgame. the amounts of money that attach to movie and TV projects are so huge, everybody’s ideas are kept tightly under wraps — it’s all very hush hush and at the same time you’re heavily monitored by whatever corporation is putting up the money. so there’s still a lot of collaboration and feedback … but it’s all from development executives

beta readers in suits

Janita Burgess
Hahaha

*levgrossman
basically

Chloe B.
lol

Shelley
lol

Stilinski
:00000
xD

Hojaverde
Beta readers in suits XDDD

Janita Burgess
Speaking of the difference between book writing and screen writing… Some storylines in the Magicians books are told out of sequence with the main plot, particularly Julia’s story. The TV adaptation has told them all concurrently. Do you feel that this difference in approach is due to restrictions of the formats? Would The Magicians have worked if Julia’s story had been included in the first book? Would the TV adaptation have worked if Julia had only featured in later seasons? How do you feel these differences changed the feel and focus of the stories?

*levgrossman
It’s a strange thing. TV stories are shaped differently, for a lot of reasons but a major one being, if people don’t watch your first few episodes, then you’re canceled

novels don’t get canceled after the first 100 pages

Valentine L.
haha

Valentina M.
True, true

*levgrossman
So with the show, a lot of stuff I held back — as a mid-game reveal — had to be front-loaded

that included Julia

though AS IT HAPPENS I think the juxtaposition of Julia’s and Quentin’s stories turned out to be quite resonant

it made me wonder whether, if I had it to do over again, I would write the books that way

Chloe B.
V interesting!

*levgrossman
Quentin’s not a very self-aware character and his point of view can be limiting … it opens things up when you can have Julia seeing him from the outside

Chloe B.
Yes, I like the idea of multiple perspectives

Hojaverde
Books and TV shows are different channels with different languages but both can be great

Janita Burgess
That’s an interesting perspective, using the requirements of the tv rating game to add extra dimension to the story.

And we have one last prepared question for today.

Fans generally fall into one of two categories: affirmational or transformational. Affirmational fans are generally male and focus on curating knowledge of canon and defending the purity of source material. Transformational fans are generally female and focus on expanding on canon with fanworks. Quentin’s knowledge of the Fillory books is better than basically anyone else’s, and he’d definitely fit into affirmational fandom, but did he ever venture into transformational fandom by doing something like writing fanfic? He certainly seems like the type of person to write some self-insert fanfic about adventuring with the Chatwins.

Valentina M.
Thst….seems very true.

Stilinski
Transformational >w<

*levgrossman
Ha — yes, self-insertion would pretty much Quentin’s mode. In a way learning to be critical of Fillory — getting to a point where he could view it transformationally — is a big part of his journey

Obviously I can understand his point of view — sometimes, especially with something you loved in childhood, you _want_it to be perfect and good and right, and to encompass all truths. It can be hard to let go.

Janita Burgess
So there we go. Writing fanfic helps you grow as a person. =)

*levgrossman
I believe that! I met Philip Pullman once and we talked about his writing Golden Compass as a response to Narnia

Pullman’s really critical of Lewis’s attitudes toward women and sexuality

Valentina L.
haha a response to which book?

ah makes sense

Stilinski
Haha

Mm

*levgrossman
That conversation gave me some of the gumption I needed to start writing The Magicians

Janita Burgess
Oh cool! And, of course, The Magicians is its own critique of Narnia.

*levgrossman
(the early drafts of The Magicians actually included sections that took place in Narnia, and featured cameos by Tumnus and Aslan)

Chloe B.
Fascinating!

Janita Burgess
Thanks so much for your thoughtful answers, Lev. We’re going to start accepting questions from everyone, now. Folks, please be respectful and try to take turns asking questions. This chat platform doesn’t allow you to see when other people are typing, so it can be tricky, I know. We’ve got about 45 minutes, though, so there’s lots of time.

Emily T.
Do you find there is a generational gap in the way your readers experience The Magicians? I first read Magicians right after finishing graduate school, and the feeling of aimlessness and ennui of some of the characters spoke to me on a pretty visceral level. But man, my middle-aged friends? While they liked the books, they pretty much considered Quentin and company to be a bunch of pitiful whiners.

Max H.
I’ve got a bit of a long winded question, feel free to bypass it.

Stilinski
XD
do you get inspiration from people you know? Like your family?

*levgrossman
Emily Thomas: T. I think that’s basically my sense as well. Though viewing Q & co as pitiful whiners is an equal opportunity thing which attracts people of all ages.

Max H.
It seems you found the process of writing the series to have been cathartic, and this is definitely the case for many writers (and readers) of fanworks and original fiction alike. I’m curious, would you say that there’s a level of catharsis in everything we write or read? That idea of stasis, which I definitely resonate with, is that related to the positive effects of catharsis and general escapism—as in, getting too caught up in these things and seeking them out repeatedly, might that contribute to the depression and isolation, and how would we, then, stop the loop? Nobody wants to partly detach themselves from the things they write or read, we seek a full immersion, but isn’t that the very thing that draws us away from reality?

Rose
When you type a new idea and let it for a few days, do you say to yourself i can make this even better or you type a new idea?

Valentine L.
Thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us. I really enjoyed your work with Time Magazine, and really loved the article you put out about fanfiction back in 2011 because it seemed to highlight this medium of entertainment that was regarded as being on the fringes. Do you think that fanfiction is still considered a subculture or part of culture now?

Shelley
Where do you get your inspiration to write the stories with such grand world building?

Stilinski
(Actually I’m completely new, I haven’t read any of the books, I just find this interesting so I came down here, but I think I’ll try some now :3)

*levgrossman
Max Hold: 100% agree, there’s a real paradox there, which I’ve rarely seen framed as clearly as you did there. It’s a strange thing that books and art in general can be hugely usefull in processing our problems, but they can also — sometimes in the same breath — distract us fatally from the realities we need to process

It’s a paradox I’ve never fully sorted out for myself, even though I write for a living
Though it does have its pleasures — even when you’re not in that aimless depressed ennui phase that Q gets stuck in, you’re way over it, there’s a feeling of relief in reading about it

Rose: I would say my ideas have a 50/50 survival rate. Sometimes I come back to them and think, this is terrible but it can be iterated into something viable. Equally often I think, this is terrible, let’s never speak of it again, and I try something new

Janita Burgess
You never come back and think “This is wonderful?”

Max H.
Exactly! It sometimes seems that writers of certain kinds are ‘doomed’ to forever be a little bit melancholy. Thanks a lot for the response.

Valentina M.
Were certain characters based off of people you know in real life?

Stilinski
The Answers are so deep

*levgrossman
@Valentine it’s funny, I have some pretty non-nerdy friends, so I often find myself talking to people for whom fanfiction is a really marginal phenomenon. But all these people are over 30. I don’t know if there are young people for whom fanfiction is anything but mainstream

Jay C.
What is your view around character attachment for writers. Some camps say one shouldn’t be attached to their characters in order to use them as the story needs.

Rose
Have you read some of the fanfiction works here on Ao3? If its a yes, have you considered including some of then for the tv series like bonus scenes or an alternate universe situation? Of course wirh giving proper credit to the writer.

*levgrossman
Shelley: I’ll tell you the honest truth, which is that I get a lot of inspiration from looking at either a) reality or b) books/TV/movies and thinking, what’s wrong with this and how can I fix it? Often I don’t worldbuild from scratch, I renovate stuff that’s out there in the culture that feels to me like it needs optimizing

Janita Burgess: that happens about once a year. but it’s great when it does

Shelley
Thank you

Shanya
Have you ever lost motivation writing one of your books and if so how did you get back into it?

*levgrossman
@Valentina there are definitely characters who contain DNA from actual living people I know! but whenever possible I avoid revealing who. and they almost never figure it out

Shelley
Oh yes I agree and been there so many times Shanya

Shanya
same tho Shelley 🙂

Valentina M.
Cool.

Shelley
Writiers block is a huge fun sucker. ><

*levgrossman
Jay C: C that’s another one of those mega-paradoxes of writing. you can’t completely detach from a character — otherwise how can you really understand how they’re feeling, and why they’re acting, and what the hell they should say next? but part of being a human being is living in a world that’s totally unsympathetic and uncaring, and as a writer you have to play the part of the world too … you switch back and forth.

Jemma H.
What helped you to create the mythos of Fillory and all its adjacent worlds? Was there a specific piece of mythology that kickstarted it, or did you cherrypick your way through?

*levgrossman
Rose: I should clarify that I actually have way less creative control of the show than you’d think — essentially zero. When Hollywood buys your book, there aren’t usually many strings attached. I have input, but no control. So I’ll cruise the Magicians fanfic. But I generally just enjoy the good stuff there for itself — it doesn’t get used anywhere else.

(there may be opportunities to use it in future … can’t talk about that yet)

Shelley
Have you ever written or considered writing Fanfic?

Jay C.
Thanks for your insight!

*levgrossman
Shanya: after I finished The Magicians Land I worked on a YA novel for 18 months … and then I stopped. I wasn’t so much unmotivated as just really unhappy with the beta reads I was getting back … people werent’ responding the way I hoped and I couldn’t figure out how to fix it. I hope I’ll go back, but I haven’t yet.

Rose
Have you sometimes while surfing the fanfics said to yourself wow this girl/guy has a great potential i would like to work one day with him/her?

*levgrossman
Jemma Harris: it really started with Narnia. I realized I felt a huge amount of love and a huge amount of frustration with Narnia, and I had to find a way to talk about it. It was almost like I was writing a letter to CS Lewis telling him how different my life was from the Pevensies. And that got blended with something similar with JK Rowling. In both cases it really started with the portal: that moment when the Pevensies went through the wardrobe, and Harry got picked up by Hagrid. That was the seed that everything grew from.

The literal first line had to do with somebody talking to a demon in a mirror, and the demon was smoking a cigarette. But that got cut.

Hojaverde
What is your opinion about self-publishing? I have always thought of it as a last resource but rejections keep coming and it is hard to keep knocking on publishers’ doors. Thanks

*levgrossman
Shelley: I’ve written fanfic for and/or with my kids. Which is a way of saying, my kids were the excuse for doing something fun. The trouble with trying to support a family of 5 just by writing is, you feel like everything you write has to bring in money. So it doesn’t leave much time for just having fun. But I’ve written Adventure Time fanfic for my oldest daughter — she loved Lord Monochromicorn, and there just wasn’t enough of him. I’ve written How to Train Your Dragon stuff (that’s online), and Star Wars and Moana stuff.

Valentina M.
Moanaaaaaaa

Shanya
thats so cool!

*levgrossman
Rose. Yes. Not necessarily working with him/her — I almost never collaborate — but it’s really not unusual for me to read fanfic and think, this person is really talented. They’re writing on a professional level. They’re doing something here that I wish I could do.

Max H.
I had the pleasure of being in a lecture with two other writers here in Australia a couple of weeks ago and they spoke, to a room full of writers, about how sometimes you have to sacrifice your creative vision and moral intent in order to write something that provides money when aspiring to make a living off of writing alone. What’s your take on this? Would you or have you sacrificed creativity and personal intent for the sake of needing an income?

*levgrossman
And conversely, I read published stuff and think, this isn’t as good as fanfic I’ve seen online

Valentine L.
hmmm you write star wars fanfic? Which era?

*levgrossman
Hojaverde: It’s funny about self-publishing, it was much less of a thing when I was starting out, but I would absolutely consider going that way if I were starting out now. If nothing else it is a massive education to watch people interacting with your work out in the wild. and there’s always the chance that publishers will pick up on your work after you’ve put it out yourself.

Shelley
How were you discovered as a writer?

Hojaverde
Thank you 🙂 To be honest I am warming up to the idea.

*levgrossman
Max Hold: H this is a hugely important and complicated question. And often a person one. As a father of three living in NewYork, my burn rate is pretty high. I worked full-time for 20 years so I could avoid making decisions based on money, but we’re living in the real world and kids have to eat — those questions come for you eventually. I will say that it’s not a zero-sum game: just because people are willing to pay money for your work doesn’t mean it’s bad! but it does sometimes dictate the projects you take on. I’ve wanted to work in comics for years, but it’s hard because there’s very little money in it. and if I don’t bring in money the bank will take my house. which tends to put one’s aesthetic scruples in perspectives very faset.

Rose
So far this chat has been really interesting ^^ im glad i joined

Valentina M.
Me, too!

Viola2909
I wonder why people say there is no ‘earning’ only writing.

*levgrossman
@Valentine Old Republic

Shelley
What advice would you give to aspiring writers and or to those wanting to get published?

Valentine L.
So like prequel backstory?

Shelley
This chat definitely has been interesting and highly thought provoking as well.

Emymmy
What’s your opinion on people who are translating fanfics in other languages ?

*levgrossman
Shelley: I was discovered very very slowly. I wrote a lot, whenever I could, for about 10 years before I was published. I was no good at selling my own work, my big stroke of luck was when a friend of mine got a job at a literary agency and offered to try to sell a novel I’d written. Even that took a couple of years, but it was the beginning of the beginning. (The novel flopped and I had to start over again after that. But at least I had an agent.)

Valentina M.
Did you have any teachers that helped push you to be a better writer? And what did they do exactly if they did?

*levgrossman
Shelley: I always steer people towards focusing on finding an agent. Having somebody whose job it is to sell your work for y9ou — and who doesn’t get paid till they do — is, well, transformative. Finding an agent usually means completing at least a partial manuscript, and then being crafty about how to pitch it, identifying what the market is for it (<–very important), and getting the pitch in front of an agent.

This sounds very businesslike and kind of industrial, but while writing is an art, the greatest art there is, publishing is still an industry

Valentine L.
what’s the best piece of advice you can give to aspiring writers and fanfic writers? Also, for people like me who don’t create content, do you have any advice for how you would want people to consume fiction?

*levgrossman
@Valentine most of it is focused on Jedi training, for some reason

Valentina M.
Random question, but what grocery store do you prefer?

*levgrossman
@Valentina M One of the things I’ve been least successful at in my writing life has been finding good mentors. This is almost completely my fault. When I was younger I was very chippy about getting help from older writers, and when you’re like that people stop offering you help pretty fast. I learned my lesson, but too late. My teachers were the writers I read, not the ones I met or who read me.

Max H.
(Thanks a ton for the responses to my questions–I love getting the alternative perspectives, this was awesome!)

*levgrossman
(The other problem is that I never got into any of the MFA programs I applied to!)

@Valentine L The advice I give is obvious but I’m pretty sure it’s true. 1) Read everything, all the time. 2) Write all the time. Doesn’t matter what. Writing hack journalism was a huge education for me, it made my fiction much much better. Just put in those 10,000 hours at the keyboard. 3) never give up. Finding your voice and breaking through can take a long long time. It took me 20 years!

In terms of consuming fiction … I don’t know! I’m not sure there’s any wrong way. I like to read on paper, but you can’t generally get fanfic that way…

Janita Burgess
Folks, we’ve got about five minutes left in the chat, so I’m sorry to say that the questions will have to wind down.

Max H.
A random question for fun if we have time: Do you have or have you had any particularly interesting writing habits or detrimental crutches when it comes to writing?

Emymmy
What’s your opinion on people who are translating fanfics in other languages ?

*levgrossman
@Valentina M that is an incredibly random question. But if you really want to know, I get my groceries at Greene Grape Provisions on Fulton St. in Brooklyn

Viola2909
How much does the plot matter in the creation of a successful book? Is that what attracts people the most or is it also the writing style, character traits?

*levgrossman
Max Hold: H Not that random. My writing habits are boring, as so much of writing is! I do it a lot, wherever I can. I write a lot on the subway. In terms of detrimental crutches … I revise too much. You can spend weeks polishing a paragraph, and the paragraph gets really glossy, but it means the rest of the book doesn’t get written. And the fact is, past a certain point nobody _really_ cares how glossy your paragraph is.

Jay C.
With little time left I just want to say this was a very interesting chat and thanks to Lev and the OTW organizers.

*levgrossman
When I catch myself putting a comma I deleted back in, that’s the signal to me that it’s time to move in

move on rather

Max H.
Definitely! Polish something too much and there’ll be nothing of it left!

Thank you so much for your time, this was great!

Valentina M.
This was an eventful chat!

*levgrossman
Viola2909: personally I’m very oriented toward plot. A well turned plot — I like nothing better. But it’s interesting about character. If people like a character, they will watch him/her/it do anything, plot be damned

Shelley
Thank you for your time. It has been real fun.

Viola2909
Wow, that’s interesting to know! Thank you so much!

Valentine L.
Yes, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with us and I appreciate all of your insights into the writing process and what you do. Will definitely pick up Magicians again for a reread.

Rose
Thanks for sharing part of your thoughts and advice!

Janita Burgess
Yes, thanks to you, Lev, for participating in this chat. It was wonderful to have you here. And thanks to all of you who joined in, whether to just observe or to ask questions. You were great. <3

*levgrossman
Thank you all! it’s been great chatting. Great questions — made me do a lot of thinking. Which is good.

Kyra
thank you for your insight!

Rose
Janita thanks for opening this chat too!

Janita Burgess
Folks, I’m going to disable the guest access on the chatroom, which will kick everybody out. Thanks again for coming, and don’t forget to look for the transcript of this chat soon in case you missed it.

*levgrossman
Yes thanks Janita for making this happen

Hojaverde
Such a interesting chat! Thanks for your time and your great answers, Lev.

Valentina M.
I will!

Jana
Thank you 🙂

Stilinski
Thank you!

Valentina M.
Thank you for answering my question, Lev!

Janita Burgess
Claudia deserves more credit than I do. Thanks to her!

Max H.
Yeah, thanks Janita! The prepared questions were really good, too. (They did inspire one of my questions, so!)

Valentine L.
thanks for answering all of our questions!

Haru33
Thanks!

Stilinski
Have a good Day!

Max H.
And thank you to Claudia, in that case!

Valentina M.
THANKS, CLAUDIA!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Janita Burgess
Ok, turning off guest access now. Be sure to check out our other chats throughout September!

Max H.
(I’ll go sleep now, it’s 4AM here. This was worth it.)

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