This Week in Fandom

This Week in Fandom, Volume 53

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, did you know that The Babadook has no Fanlore page? If only someone would tell its story.


Sad news for vid lovers this week: VividCon is shutting down. According to a post on the convention’s Dreamwidth community, 2018 will be its final year. Organizers say there were multiple factors that contributed to the decision. “We could make significant structural changes to VividCon, reduce programming, make it smaller – but odds are we would run into the same problems again before long, and in any case, something that different doesn’t feel like VividCon to us. We’ve decided as a staff to end on a high note and make VividCon 2018 the final run.”

VividCon 2018 will be a “last hurrah finale,” while the upcoming VividCon 2017 will be the last “normal” con. Registration is still open for both in-person a streaming versions of VividCon 2017, which will be held August 4-6 in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Dates for VividCon 2018 have not yet been announced.


The Verge published an interview with Flourish Klink this week about the recent Fansplaining podcast survey (conducted along with Elizabeth Minkle), which asked people to define fanfiction. In case you missed it, you can check out the podcast episode where the results are discussed here on Tumblr (transcript available at link). The raw data is also available for both the multiple choice questions and the open-ended question.

In the interview with The Verge, Klink discussed the results of the survey, including the major themes and surprises. Apparently, “people who took the survey agreed on almost nothing.” According to Klink, “people who had entered fandom in the ‘90s were much more likely to talk about fan fiction as being not-for-profit, as being separate from the creators, and separate from the powers that be,” while other people consider it more important that “fan fiction is also a specific culture that’s developed” with its own tropes and conventions that aren’t found in derivative works created outside of fannish spaces. As Klink puts it, “No one toes out of their shoes in Lincoln in the Bardo.”

What do you think of the results of this survey? Do you fall into one of the big categories? Or are you an outlier with uncommon opinions? Let us know in the comments!


Romance and Fantasy author Racheline Maltese wrote an article for BoingBoing recently about “the wizard” behind the curtain of your favourite media.

“I’ve been in fandom for over thirty years, and in that time, I’ve had only one hard-won rule about it: Never, ever meet the wizard. Actors are always shorter than you think; writers don’t always understand why their villains are your heroes; and the deep, meaningful conversations you’ve rehearsed in your head a thousand times tend not to go as planned.”

The article transitions, though, to how having dinner with authors Ellen Kushner and Patty Bryant led to Maltese being asked to write for the Tremontaine serialized stories. Despite initial nervousness and worry that she would be singled out for being “the fanfiction writer,” all the writers collaborated well in ways that were the same as how Maltese worked with fellow fanfic writers. Rather than the wizard being fake, the curtain was fake. “If you write stories–in your sandbox or anyone else’s–the truth is that you’ve already met the wizard, because that’s what all of us that tell stories are.”


Lastly, there’s been some unhappiness in the K-pop fandom. According to Soompi, some Super Junior fans are unhappy with Sungmin. The article says that “one of Super Junior’s most influential fan communities, DC Super Junior gallery, has demanded that member Sungmin be expelled from the group,” and plans to “boycott all of his activities as a celebrity.” Apparently, the things that fans “deemed most problematic [were] Sungmin’s way of announcing his marriage and his lack of communication with fans after being discharged from the army.” Super Junior is planning a comeback for later this year.


We want your suggestions! If you have a story you think we should include, please contact us! Suggestions are welcome in all languages. Submitting a story doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a TWIF post, and inclusion of a story doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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