Outlines of a man and woman speaking with word bubbles, one of which has the OTW logo and the other which says 'OTW Announcement

Phishing and Domain Names

A few months ago, we learned that someone had registered the domain name archiveofourowno.com and copied the front page of Archive Of Our Own at that url; they even included a login screen that mimicked the AO3 login.

We immediately went to GoDaddy–the registrar of the domain name–and asked them to remove the website, because it violated their bar on phishing (that is, tricking someone into giving away login or other personal information). GoDaddy’s Terms state that they will not allow a site to impersonate “a legitimate, trustworthy site” by tricking “visitors into providing them sensitive information like logins.” However, GoDaddy never responded and did not take the site down.

Therefore, in January, the OTW Legal Committee initiated a proceeding with the World Intellectual Property Office with the goal of stripping the domain name from the infringers. In April, after the infringers had failed to respond, the WIPO Panel ruled in our favor. The panel held that Bradley Binkley of Chicago, who had registered the domain name, had “in all likelihood… registered the disputed domain name with the aim of exploiting and profiting from the Complainant’s mark, through the impersonation of the Complainant in furtherance of a fraudulent phishing scheme.” As a result, the panel voided Binkley’s registration of the name, and the OTW is currently in the process of setting up the domain name to point to the main Archive of Our Own page. (more…)

Banner by Erin of a spotlight shining the OTW logo behind the text spotlight on legal issues

FOSTA/SESTA and Fans

Lately, OTW Legal has received many queries and concerns about recent U.S. legislation known as FOSTA/SESTA. We want to reassure you that the law as it currently stands does not apply to fiction, and therefore should have no impact on the Archive of Our Own.

The term “FOSTA/SESTA” refers to legislation that has been passed by U.S. Congress and the Senate, purporting to combat what it describes as “sex trafficking.” The legislation would make it a crime to operate an interactive computer service “with the intent to promote or facilitate the prostitution of another person.” (That is, the exchange of sex for money.) Under the law, sites that “knowingly assist[], support[], or facilitate[]” prostitution can be held liable for user-posted material. (more…)

Banner by Alice of a book/eReader with an OTW bookmark and a USB plug going into the spine

Transformative Works and Cultures Vol. 26

Transformative Works and Cultures has released No. 26.

The essays in this March 15, 2018, issue focus on Social TV Fandom and the Media Industries, guest edited by Myles McNutt.

This exciting issue contains essays about Sleepy Hollow, The 100, Wynonna Earp, and Twin Peaks: The Return fans and fan engagement. To discuss the “social” in “social TV,” contributors discuss use of Twitter, #hashtags, and emoticons. Also featured is an interview with Flourish Klink of Chaotic Good Studios.

The next issue of TWC, No. 27, is a guest-edited issue on Tumblr and Fandom. It will appear on June 15, 2018.

We welcome Symposium articles for our 10th anniversary issue, which focuses on the Future of Fandom.

TWC’s current calls for papers include the following issues (more info at Announcements):

  • General Issue with emphasis on The Future of Fandom, September 2018 (CLOSED, email us for Symposium)
  • Romance/Fans: Sexual Fantasy, Love, and Genre in Fandom, March 2019 (CLOSED, email us for Symposium)
  • Fans of Color, Fandoms of Color June 2019 (CLOSED, email us for Symposium)
  • Fan Fiction and Ancient Scribal Cultures, December 2019 (submissions due June 1, 2018)
  • Fan Studies Methodologies, March 2020 (submissions due January 1, 2019)
  • Fandom and Politics, June 2020 (submissions due January 1, 2019)

We accept on a rolling basis submissions for our general issues, which always appear on September 15.