This Week in Fandom banner by Alix Ayoub

This Week in Fandom, Volume 119

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we get started, have you seen the fandom lunch table meme that’s doing the rounds? Where are you sitting? Feel free to set your own challenges in the comments!


As the stars of Supernatural took a break from filming their 15th and final season to show up for a panel at the TCAs (and almost got kicked out of the party before it started), Hannah Collins at CBR took a moment to consider ‘How “Wincest” Became Supernatural Canon’. No, you didn’t read that wrong; the show hasn’t moved onto HBO for its final season. Instead, Collins’s article discusses Supernatural‘s well-known tendency to break the fourth wall. The show’s meta episodes have taken Sam and Dean to a fan convention, to a musical based on their lives, and even to the Vancouver set of Supernatural itself. This willingness on the part of the showrunners to embrace their fandom, to the point of incorporating them into the narrative, might well be one reason for its impressive longevity. And it’s not over yet. Fans of the show’s digressions into metafiction will be pleased to know that in a recent interview, the show’s longstanding executive producer Bob Singer promised one last ‘big, crazy swing’ before the series wraps up. Read More

OTW Guest Post

OTW Guest Post: Jessica Leski

From time to time, the OTW will be hosting guest posts on our OTW News accounts. These guests will be providing an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom where our projects may have a presence. The posts express each author’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. We welcome suggestions from fans for future guest posts, which can be left as a comment here or by contacting us directly.

Jessica Leski’s debut feature, I Used to be Normal: A Boyband Fangirl Story, had its World Premiere at Hot Docs in 2018 and has been screening at festivals around the world since, including the London Film Festival, Sydney Film Festival, and Rotterdam Film Festival. I Used to be Normal was released in Australian cinemas in late 2018 by Madman Entertainment and will be released on US screens via Fuse TV on May 18th 2019. Today, Jessica talks about her fandom project.

How did you first find out about fandom or fanworks?

My first experience of fandom was in 1999 when I became a big Dawson’s Creek fan. I loved watching the show with my friends and dissecting it with them afterwards, but I always felt like it was a much bigger part of my life than it was for them. I wrote university essays about it, I saw lookalikes everywhere I went, and I even had one or two moments when I felt reality blur about whether the characters were people I knew in real life or not. This was pretty early in my relationship with the internet, so I wasn’t aware of message boards or forums and things like that. So I found myself searching for ways to express my fandom in real life.

I was in my first year of film school at the time, and for one of my assignments I re-created the opening sequence of Dawson’s Creek, shot for shot, with lookalikes. When we had a screening of all our films at the end of the year the other students laughed and clapped in recognition at mine, but the teachers were completely baffled; they had no idea what they were watching. Luckily a fellow student stood up and likened it to Gus Van Sant’s remake of Psycho, and I ended up getting a good grade!

It took another ten years before I became a fan of something to that same level, and this time it was UK boyband One Direction. I was taken completely by surprise because I had never liked a boyband before, and I was 31 years old at the time, not the target age range at all.

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This Week in Fandom

This Week in Fandom, Volume 108

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, in case you haven’t heard, parts of the MCU movie Avengers: Endgame have been leaked. Be careful with spoilers, people.


Speaking of spoilers, this next section has plenty for The Magicians. Also, warning for mention of suicide.

The season four finale of the SyFy show aired this past week, and it sent fans reeling. In short, main character Quentin sacrificed his life to save his friends, and he won’t be back next season. Fans are upset about the message this sends, given that Quentin was a bisexual man who suffered from clinical depression, and they’re alleging that the show is using the Bury Your Gays trope and glorifying suicide. Read More