This Week in Fandom Volume 12

This Week in Fandom, Volume 45

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, a heads up that it appears that people are still debating sexism in Doctor Who and its fandom. With 30 comments so far on a 300-word article.


The Guardian posted an article written by a furry fan hoping to dispel the stigma surround the practice. The author, Brian Switek, recounts their personal experience accepting the fact that they’re a furry, and that that’s ok.

(more…)

Feedback Fest speech bubble with multilanguage feedback phrases

Welcome to Feedback Fest 2017

International Fanworks Day is nearly here. To celebrate we are kicking off one of our planned events today, which is Feedback Fest!

How does it work?

We know you love fanworks, that’s why you’re here reading this! So get specific.

Leave a comment here recommending at least three fanworks, and say something about why you love these works and think others should check them out. You can also link to a rec post you’ve made elsewhere and tagged with #IFDFest. Remember that fan communities, newsletters, archives, and other resources are fanworks too so there are a lot of possibilities.

For everyone checking out the recced fanworks, don’t forget to leave comments, likes, kudos or other love to those fan creators to help spread the squee.

Banner by James Baxter with a calendar icon and the text This Week in Fandom on a white background

This Week in Fandom, Volume 23

Rubin Richardson wrote an article for New York Amsterdam News about Flame Com 2, the LGBT+ comic and fan convention held in New York on August 19th and 20th. The article celebrated the humour and positivity found in contemporary LGBT+ media. “Growing up, many, if not all, LGBT stories I heard were those of tragedies,” says Richardson. Amidst a 2016 rife with media producers burying their gays, Flame Con 2 panelists talked about “the question as to the need for humor in LGBTQ comics,” saying “[for some] it was simply their writing style, whereas others drew a deeper connection. For many people, life can be hard, especially for those growing up in the LGBTQ community, and humor is something many of us as people use as a coping mechanism to deal with hardships.”


In other news, it’s time for some surveys! Two academics studying fandom are soliciting responses for their research.

(more…)