Links Roundup for 28 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about enduring fandom that might be of interest to fans:

  • Last week, US NPR radio show Fresh Air rebroadcast its interview with author Allison Pearson about her novel I Think I Love You, in which she fictionalizes her experience as a Partridge Family fan in 1970s England. She discusses both her own life and the novel, noting, “We carry our younger selves with us our whole lives, and we can measure out [our] lives somewhat by music we’ve loved or icons we’ve loved.”
  • Liz Danforth, an editor, writer, game scenario designer, and game developer discussed her turn into fan fiction, which she believes has resulted in some of her best work. “I felt the itch to write the first fiction I had even attempted in almost a decade, but I was shamefaced at the prospect of writing fanfic. I was a pro! Fanfic was for amateurs!…To my shock, I found I was still a writer after all. I had stories to tell. I had a character I adored, living in a world that I was passionate about. If there is nothing else WoW ever gave me, it gave me back a part of myself I truly believed lost. And I will be grateful forever.”
  • For those who express their fannishness without the written word, a new site, Star Wars Remix, launched this month seeking contributions from those who see their fandom in everyday objects, from thumbtacks to burgers.

If you’re part of music, gaming, or Star Wars fandom, why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 21 September 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about fans leading the way that might be of interest to fans:

  • Fans have managed to put all sorts of sites and technologies to use to recommend and share reading material. A recent study suggests that the key to eBook adoption is to facilitate sharing and recommendations among readers. A different study done with iTunes users supports this finding, noting that purchases increased by 50% among users offered recommendations, primarily because they were broadening their interests. What’s more, sharing recommendations increased a sense of community. “The authors found that all kinds of users — close as well as far — became closer to one another on their networks in the [group given recommendations] relative to [those who did not get them].”
  • Writers and readers working together to further develop stories has also been a staple of fan communities. Now Amazon is developing an infrastructure for readers to have conversations with authors and Nieman Labs suggests that this will change what books are about by creating extensions to the original texts. “Authorship in that sense being not just about creation, but about influence more diffusively…Amazon is encouraging, in other words, questions whose answers aren’t just supplemental to the books they address, but also literally extensive to them. The answers, in effect, become part of the books.”
  • Lastly, this blog post uses Harry Potter to speculate on how movies, books, and fan fiction are on a detail-oriented spectrum. “[M]ovies can pare away your details and get at the core of your story” while if “you think the world of the books can—nay, should—be fleshed out even more…you may find fanfiction…right up your (Diagon) alley.”

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 19 September 2011

Here are a few action alerts that might be of interest to fans:

  • Many fans have used bookmarking sites such as del.icio.us to keep track of fan works they want to read, have viewed, or want to return to. Many more fans have also used one another’s lists to find new material. However, this functionality and fannish history may soon be lost once Delicious completes its transfer to new ownership. Fans wanting to save their bookmarks for their own use and that of others have until September 23 to authorize migration of their data to the new website or transfer it to another service.
  • Last week two authors attempting to publish a novel with a diverse representation of characters encountered a specific response from an agent suggesting that there is no market for gay characters in young adult (YA) literature. Their response was to ask that readers make their voices heard about what they want to see published. YA author Malinda Lo posted a follow-up providing statistics on how much YA literature contains queer representations and who is doing the publishing.

If you use bookmarking sites as part of your fannish habits or are part of YA literature fandoms, why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.