Links Roundup for 31 August 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about gender and sexuality in fandom that might be of interest to fans:

  • In a strong counterexample to the women’s invisibility problem demonstrated by the L.A. Times’ entertainment blog Hero Complex (which is subtitled “For your inner fanboy”), a group of female cosplayers at Comic Con created the Gender Bent Justice League where men and women genderswap well known superheroes. The group is making a statement as well as having fun: “We try to keep it pretty scantily clad for [the men] because that’s how women are portrayed,” says Silver. “We weren’t scantily clad for ourselves because that’s not the point. We’re showing that girls can be clothed and be superheroes because, most of the time, they aren’t.”
  • Also helping to keep women visible in fandom, Chicks Dig Time Lords, a book celebrating female Doctor Who fandom, recently won a Hugo award. The volume includes a contribution from OTW Board member Francesca Coppa: Girl Genius: Nyssa of Traken.
  • In the BitchMedia post Ambiguously Gay Wizards, actors in the Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings fandoms are cited as examples of playing gay to the fans for professional reasons. “But it also highlights how much of the cultural bandwidth Straight Men playing or imitating Gay Men is starting to take up, and how lucrative being ambiguously heteroflexible can be in securing more of the fandom’s attention”.

There are currently no entries on Fanlore for the Justice League. If you’re part of that fandom or have taken part in cosplay the site could use your contributions!

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Links Roundup for 29 August 2011

Here’s a roundup of stories about fannish technology that may be of interest to fans:

  • Last week the Electronic Frontier Foundation posted about a recent U.S. court decision on the legality of online music storage. While noting that the court upheld penalties for businesses who don’t respond to valid takedown notices, the EFF concluded that “Overall, we were glad to see the Court get it right that music locker services fall safely within the DMCA’s safe harbors, which Congress designed to foster innovation on the Internet. MP3tunes and all the music locker services that have followed it give music fans more options for storing and listening to the music they already own, helping realize the promise of that innovation.”
  • While music fans have been adopting online music storage, many fanfic readers have been adopting eReaders to store and access their fannish materials. A recent survey by Nielsen concluded: “Looking at the data by gender underlines key changes in the eReader category. Sixty-one percent of all eReader owners are now female, compared to a mere 46 percent in Q3 2010.” Most significant is the growth in users 55 and older who now account for 30% of the eReader market compared to owning a much smaller percentage of similar technology such as smartphones and tablets. The AO3 has been proactive in the inclusion of easy downloading formats for text content, which is not only a convenience for fans but enhances accessibility for all users.

If you’re part of music fandoms or have long used eReaders to access fanfic, why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Additions to the site are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

OTW board chair Naomi Novik on NPR

March 25, 2009 – Our own Naomi Novik appears on today’s broadcast of NPR’s All Things Considered, in a a story called Will E-Book Anti-Piracy Technology Hurt Readers? The aired program, as well as a shorter print version, is now available at the NPR website. Naomi is speaking against the DRM [Digital Rights Management] protection on e-books that mean that they can’t easily be transferred from Kindle to Laptop to iPhone. Naomi notes that: “The biggest danger to most authors, to most storytellers, is not that somebody is going to steal your work and pass it along — it is that nobody is ever going to see your work.”