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This Week in Fandom, Volume 64

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, a huge thank you to everyone who participated in our October membership drive, either by donating or signal boosting. We’re thrilled to have exceeded our goal thanks to your generous support.


Because TWIF had to take a break for the membership drive (and other important OTW announcements), we sort of missed a big story, but since the conversation it started is still ongoing, we’ll talk about it here this week. Yup, we’re referring to The Szechuan Incident. (more…)

Support the OTW by Reading!

Choose Books, Buy Books, Support the OTW

The Organization for Transformative Works is celebrating its 10th anniversary because thousands of fans have supported it through donations over the years. And while direct donations are the most helpful form of support (which can be made at any time of the year) there are other ways to help. You can:

  • check with your workplace to see if they’ll do corporate matching of donations
  • if you use Amazon in the U.S. for purchases, sign up to Amazon Smile and select the OTW as your charity of choice.

(There are even automatic redirect apps you can install on Chrome or Firefox so you won’t have to remember to sign in to Smile).

But probably the most fun way is to purchase one or both books whose royalties support the OTW! Below, three of the OTW’s founding members — Kristina Busse, Karen Hellekson, and Francesca Coppa — from our Transformative Works & Cultures committee discuss the books they edited: The Fanfiction Reader: Folk Tales for the Digital Age and The Fan Fiction Studies Reader.
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OTW Guest Post

OTW Guest Post: Henry Jenkins

From time to time, the OTW will be hosting guest posts on our OTW News accounts. These guests will be providing an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom where our projects may have a presence. The posts express each author’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. We welcome suggestions from fans for future guest posts, which can be left as a comment here or by contacting us directly.

Henry Jenkins is one of the best known media scholars studying fandom. His 1992 book Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture has been read all over the world, and is seen as one of the foundational texts of the fan studies field. When we asked if he’d do this month’s guest post for our 10th anniversary, he replied “It’s an honor to be asked to perform this role.” Henry talks with us about fans, students, and fandom.

Textual Poachers continues to be widely read by students and those curious about fans and fandom, but you’ve written a dozen books since and many more articles. What do you think has changed the most about fandom from your early days as both a researcher and as a participant?

In terms of fandom, the impact of digital media has been decisive: expanding the scope of fandom, including greater connections between fans around the world; accelerating the speed of fan response in terms of being able to react in real time to our favorite programs; creating a space where fan works are much more visible to the culture at large (for better and for worse); allowing people to find their way into fandom at a much younger age; and increasing the impact of fan activists in seeking to assert their voice in response to canceled programs. (One has to look no further than the dramatic reversal of fortune for Timeless this past spring).

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