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Transformative Works and Cultures Vol. 26

Transformative Works and Cultures has released No. 26.

The essays in this March 15, 2018, issue focus on Social TV Fandom and the Media Industries, guest edited by Myles McNutt.

This exciting issue contains essays about Sleepy Hollow, The 100, Wynonna Earp, and Twin Peaks: The Return fans and fan engagement. To discuss the “social” in “social TV,” contributors discuss use of Twitter, #hashtags, and emoticons. Also featured is an interview with Flourish Klink of Chaotic Good Studios.

The next issue of TWC, No. 27, is a guest-edited issue on Tumblr and Fandom. It will appear on June 15, 2018.

We welcome Symposium articles for our 10th anniversary issue, which focuses on the Future of Fandom.

TWC’s current calls for papers include the following issues (more info at Announcements):

  • General Issue with emphasis on The Future of Fandom, September 2018 (CLOSED, email us for Symposium)
  • Romance/Fans: Sexual Fantasy, Love, and Genre in Fandom, March 2019 (CLOSED, email us for Symposium)
  • Fans of Color, Fandoms of Color June 2019 (CLOSED, email us for Symposium)
  • Fan Fiction and Ancient Scribal Cultures, December 2019 (submissions due June 1, 2018)
  • Fan Studies Methodologies, March 2020 (submissions due January 1, 2019)
  • Fandom and Politics, June 2020 (submissions due January 1, 2019)

We accept on a rolling basis submissions for our general issues, which always appear on September 15.

OTW Guest Post

OTW Guest Post: Catherine Coker

From time to time, the OTW will be hosting guest posts on our OTW News accounts. These guests will be providing an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom where our projects may have a presence. The posts express each author’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. We welcome suggestions from fans for future guest posts, which can be left as a comment here or by contacting us directly.

Cait Coker is a genre historian with a background in fan history, women’s writing and publishing, and print history. Her essays have appeared in The Journal of Fandom Studies and The Seventeenth Century, among others. Today, Catherine talks about the issues raised in her Transformative Works and Cultures article titled “The margins of print? Fan fiction as book history.”

How did you first get into fandom and fanworks?

I was a teenager back in the 1990s when the Internet was becoming more widely available, and I came across a book on sale at Walmart (I was a kid in a small town, what can I say?) called Net Trek, which was a guide to Star Trek sites and listservs online….with a whole chapter dedicated to fan fiction (and even a little bit about K/S slash!). A few months later I got my first computer (and the Internet) and immediately started looking for fan fiction for all of my favorite shows, and soon after started writing stories myself. It was all downhill from there!


This Week in Fandom banner by Alix Ayoub

This Week in Fandom, Volume 64

Welcome to This Week in Fandom, the OTW’s roundup of things which are happening! Before we start, a huge thank you to everyone who participated in our October membership drive, either by donating or signal boosting. We’re thrilled to have exceeded our goal thanks to your generous support.

Because TWIF had to take a break for the membership drive (and other important OTW announcements), we sort of missed a big story, but since the conversation it started is still ongoing, we’ll talk about it here this week. Yup, we’re referring to The Szechuan Incident. (more…)