Fannish Practices

  • OTW Fannews: Doing it New School

    By thatwasjustadream on Sunday, 17 May 2015 - 6:11pm
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    curved lines drawn in purple, maroon, orange and yellow over a white background with shades of purple, tan and red filling the spaces between them and the word OTW Fannews Doing it New School written through the right hand side of the graphic

    • DNAInfo reported on workshops that use Sci-Fi, Fan Fiction to Teach Girls STEM and Writing Skills. "'A lot of the series that are popular today, like ‘Hunger Games’ or ‘Divergent,’ feature white characters...We think it’s really important to expose girls to visions of the future that have girls that look like them in leading roles doing the changing.' The project’s namesake, author Octavia E. Butler, inspired the founders to use science fiction as a way to talk about broader issues in social activism, gender, class and race. 'She looked at society through a real critical lens and didn’t sugarcoat anything...It blew me away because I never saw how sci-fi could be used to make me think of history and my own role.'”
    • Olin College professor Allen Downey had some of his students post a Bayesian Survival Analysis in A Song of Ice and Fire on his blog. "Using data from A Wiki of Ice and Fire, we created a dataset of all 916 characters that appeared in the books so far. For every character, we know what chapter and book they first appeared, if they are male or female, if they are part of the nobility or not, what major house they are loyal to, and, if applicable, the chapter and book of their death. We used this data to predict which characters will survive the next couple books."
    • MediaCommons is an academic site that hosts discussion on both courses, research and discussion surrounding reading, writing, and literature. Among the topics is fan fiction, such as this post by Charles Dunbar about learning to write outside one's comfort zone. "I had found the old notebook in which all those stories Colleen had been written into were hastily stuffed, and after reading them over, decided I had done a grave disservice to the character. Yes she was a fan-fiction creation, but she was also part of my writer’s experience, and as such I felt she deserved something more than the role of hostage-girlfriend...So I picked up a pen and began to write. But before I did, I decided to make one little change: rather than approach Colleen as the main character’s girlfriend…I made her the main character."

    Where have you seen appearances of fanworks in academia? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Doing Your Part

    By Kelly Ribeiro on Tuesday, 12 May 2015 - 4:49pm
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    Doing Your Part

    • NPR was among some reporting on a new Russian policy that began banning some memes. "In effect it really bans all memes using celebrities. Insofar as the language of this announcement, which was posted on VKontakte (ph) - which is the Russian equivalent of Facebook - they said that any images that use famous people's identities, or images, they're against the law if they take that image out of context of that person's reputation." However, "this decision is totally unenforceable. The entire point is not to purge the Internet of bad things. It's to make people online afraid of getting in trouble."
    • The New York Times warned that Net Neutrality progress in the U.S. didn't mean that it wasn't under threat elsewhere. "Last month, the European Council...adopted a proposal that would allow telecommunications companies to charge Internet businesses like Netflix and Google fees to deliver their videos and other content to users faster than could smaller companies that cannot afford to pay for preferential treatment. In India, the country’s telecommunications regulator asked for comments on whether it should adopt a provision similar to what Europe is considering. The regulator also asked if telecom companies should be able to charge users extra fees for services like YouTube, WhatsApp and Skype on top of the fees people already pay for access to the Internet."
    • The OTW has petitioned for a renewal of a DMCA exemption for fan video makers. Our Legal team has been asking that fans write in about their need for high quality source from sources that are only available on Blu-Ray; or sources from places like iTunes or Amazon when that's necessary to make a timely vid to participate in an ongoing fannish conversation. OTW Staffers will be testifying before the Copyright Office at the end of May to extend their rights to break encryption to Blu-Ray, as well as maintain them for DVD and streaming sources.

    What efforts have you seen fans making to oppose restrictive laws? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Skewing the Process

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 19 April 2015 - 5:23pm
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    Banner by Kat of a scale with 'OTW Fannews' on one side and 'Skewing the process' on the other

    • Matt Binder wrote in Salon that right-wing conservatives in the U.S. were trying to exploit the activities of misogynistic fans for personal gain and political capital. "A common tactic used by right-wingers is the call to 'stop politicizing everything' — while at the same time trying to push forth their own political agenda in the culture wars, of course. Keeping politics out of any art form is laughable, but there is a certain extra level of hilarity in attempting to do so with one that already has a long history of social justice...these are actual panels from an actual Green Lantern co-starring Green Arrow comic from April 1970 addressing racial justice head-on."
    • At Medium is the Message, Rex Sorgatz discussed changing habits regarding spoilers. "Back in the aughts, we survived a similar crisis, when two cultural events coincided:The quality of television programming suddenly got much better [and] The conversations around television exploded on social media. The collision of these trends triggered a nuclear reaction — a pop culture fission, spewing immense heat. People got very, very serious about The Spoiler Alert. The burgeoning recap society, in particular, was put under immense scrutiny."
    • Japan Times talked about how marketing tricks meant fans were skewing the music sales charts. "The problem is that music purchases by idol fans aren’t really music purchases at all: They are a sort of abstract currency by which the fans make extravagant expressions of love for the group — the more you buy, the greater your love. They’re a completely different class of consumer from someone who simply buys a song in order to listen to it, and trying to force them to behave like traditional music fans misses the point."
    • The Millions featured a long piece from Elizabeth Minkel on academic courses on fanfiction. "The cynical side of me expected to hear that a fanfiction class in an Ivy League English department would’ve been met with criticism from the old guard...But [Jamison] hasn’t encountered professional backlash at Princeton or back home in Utah. 'I’m sure there are people who think that but they haven’t told me about it — not my colleagues...I get more pushback on YA and, frankly, on Victorian women’s poetry than I do on fanfic. Nothing can match the snideness with which male scholars of modernism tend to regard Victorian poetry by women.'”

    Where have you seen fans changing cultural practices? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: It's Your Fault

    By .Lindsey D on Wednesday, 8 April 2015 - 4:59pm
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    OTWFannews banner with text It's Your Fault and a hand with a finger pointed forward

    • A post at GQ focused on a documentary about the making of a fan film tribute to another film and decided that fanworks have become too common for notice. "[T]he genre's been so co-opted by the mainstream that it's now part of the marketing playbook. Cultural gatekeepers are now enlisting us to submit our footage for their projects. Take the Ridley Scott-produced documentary Life in a Day, or EMIC, Google Play's recent collaboration with Christopher Nolan to promote Interstellar. In a weird way, people look at you funny if you're not filming something for your YouTube channel, or figuring out how to conquer Vine. These days, it's almost more audacious to say, 'No thanks—I'm just gonna be the audience.'"
    • Nintendo Life didn't get the memo, and instead wrote about a Zelda fan film. "The Zelda Project is a fan run website based in Los Angeles, California that focuses on recreating various scenes and locales from the Zelda series via photography, film, and art. Player Piano is a YouTube channel run by Filmmaker Tom Grey that primarily focuses on classically-trained musician, Sonya Belousova, recreating video game music on a piano. Both of these groups appear to be quite talented, so this fan-film could definitely be worth a watch when it's completed."
    • A number of outlets wrote about the implications of the all-female and all-male Ghostbusters remakes. Salon decided that the fault doesn't just lie with a sexist culture but that the blame also lies with fanworks. "[S]tudios are actually listening to their customers, and remakes are what you want. It’s what you’re making, after all — and by 'you' I mean the vast majority of people out in the indie fan world that supposedly serves as our alternative, our escape from the moribund studio system. What has the Internet been spending all this time making? Fan fiction, fan art, fan films. It’s hard to tell at times if the people making 'gritty reboot' trailers are parodying Hollywood or unironically creating something they want."
    • The author of Vulture's recent piece on fanfiction was interviewed by New Hampshire Public Radio, and asked if she thought there was great fanfiction available. "I found fanfiction that was ok and every once in a while something that I thought 'Oh, that's pretty good'. But I think...it's really more the writing and the reading and the sharing than the end product...Every single piece of fanfiction is like a work in progress...and it's such a sort of group experience that it's difficult to apply a term like 'great' to it. That's like saying 'Is there a great fairy tale', I mean there isn't a definitive version of any fairy tale, there's just a million different tellings." (No transcript available).

    Has the spread of fanworks reached a tipping point? Write about your evidence in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish Legacies

    By Janita Burgess on Thursday, 26 March 2015 - 4:50pm
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    OTW Fannews banner by caitie~ with the text Fannish Legacies and art of Spock holding his hand in the Live Long and Prosper gesture

    • The Conversation featured a discussion of Leonard Nimoy's impact on fandom. "[I]t’s no surprise that for many fans, the loss of Leonard Nimoy felt like the loss of a family member. Nimoy was happy to be known as the 'geek grandpa,' and embraced his key role in history and development of fandom. Those early fans – who, so many years ago, fell in love with Kirk and Spock – proved that their passion could make a difference, that fan communities could be a force for good. They took a page out of Star Trek and refused to apologize for being different. Just like Mr. Spock."
    • A less positive overview at The Guardian did not see it as a good thing that Trekker culture now rules the world. "The subculture around Star Trek has been famously productive for a long time. There are fan-produced shows, lexicons of Klingon, detailed technical diagrams of the show’s fictional technologies, voluminous Wikipedia entries, and terabytes of fan fiction. Conventions have been running for 40 years; fan-musicians write 'filk music' based on themes and events in the show. This productivity made Trekker a centrepiece of an intellectual effort, starting in the 1990s, to redeem fan culture, one which fed directly into contemporary orthodoxies about the nature of social media and digital culture."
    • One fan was influenced by other fandoms, but found in them equally important life lessons. "I grew up quite poor, and lived in shoddy (to put it politely) conditions until I was nine years old. I split my time between my father and stepmother, and my biological mother and stepfather. This was the way it was for four years. I used to get really jealous over the other students around me, and would cry when I saw happy families joking and laughing together...When I was in first grade, I discovered Batman. This made all the difference in my outlook on things. It didn’t matter that I stuttered, had crooked teeth, or came from a broken home. What mattered the most was what I did with the opportunities presented to me. I sought to excel academically, as well as help others do the same."
    • Fan site The One Ring is looking at its future as the Tolkien films end. "It’s important to remember that while the movies brought many of us to the writing of JRR Tolkien, and we are glad they did, millions of fans supported and loved Tolkien’s writing and the lifestyles and ethics described in them, for decades before the films came around. It was the pre-existing love of Tolkien that brought the founders and early staff together in the first place, before the first movie was released back in 2001. This popular support of Tolkien will continue to exist going forward, we believe for decades to come."

    What fannish legacies do you want to see preserved? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Transformative Works and Cultures Releases Issue No. 18

    By Janita Burgess on Tuesday, 17 March 2015 - 4:38pm
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    Banner by Alice of a book/eReader with an OTW bookmark and a USB plug going into the spine

    Transformative Works and Cultures, issue number 18, “Performance and Performativity in Fandom,” guest edited by Lucy Bennett (Cardiff University) and Paul J. Booth (DePaul University), has been released. This special issue focuses on performance as it relates to fandom and comprises scholarly research articles, personal essays, interviews, and book reviews.

    As the editors write in their editorial, “We want to problematize this notion of fandom as a particular behavior and instead note the characteristics of being that permeate a fannish identity” (1.3). Accordingly, the contributions focus on fannish artworks and contributions as a form of performance, including an analysis of a Facebook group of fans of 19th-century British literature who post images of fictional constructions in the act of reading (Dawn Opel); a study of identity via fannish tattoos, with this sort of performance linked to sacred experience (Bethan Jones); and a discussion of Harry Potter slash disseminated within LiveJournal communities as a form of performance (Darlene Rose Hampton).

    Other articles address performativity through topics including language learners and Na’vi (Christine Schreyer), Doctor Who–themed weddings (Jessica Elizabeth Johnston), horror film audience reaction movie trailers (Alexander Swanson), and Sims fandom on Tumblr (Ruth A. Deller). Abigail De Kosnik links performance studies to new media studies, with a particular focus on fandom.

    Cosplay, an overt form of performativity, is directly addressed in several contributions: Ellen Kirkpatrick addresses cosplay and the superhero genre, Nicolle Lamerichs writes about cosplay music videos, and Shelby Fawn, in a personal essay, relates cosplay to her personal growth. Relatedly, Brendan Riley writes about zombie walks.

    Interviews are with Kurt Lancaster, an early scholar of performance in fan studies, and Joy DeLyria and Kris Hambrick, the cofounders of Hello Earth Productions, a theater company that produces outdoor (re)performances of classic Star Trek episodes.


    Transformative Works and Cultures, is part of the Organization for Transformative Works, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. We exist entirely due to the generosity of our donors. If you would like our work to continue, please consider donating today.

  • OTW Fannews: Being In the Know

    By Janita Burgess on Saturday, 28 February 2015 - 7:51pm
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    OTW Fannews Banner by caitie with a rainbow shooting star and the words OTW Fannews: Being In the Know

    • A post at Movie Pilot pointed out how early fanwork passions can begin. "I was on Wattpad and came across a profile and her name was Alexandria1019. She has a couple of stories she wrote, which are amazing in my point of view...And the coolest thing, she's a 7th grader." Her dreams are short-term but her reasons are universal. "'When I get older, and go to high school, I want to join a writing club. I want to be a writer because whenever I write, it's like I'm in a totally different universe. Like I'm not in reality...I know they aren't my characters and my story that I wrote myself, but it gives me a chance too express what I think. Because, I can't really express what I think to people.'"
    • These early lessons can have a big impact though. An article at Neon Tommy discussed why people respond to fanfiction. "I found myself reading multiple stories like Red’s, about kids who used fanfiction as a means to improve their English, and with fantastic results. Users told me about how fanfiction helped expand their vocabulary, as well as experiences such as an anonymous user who 'learned about the culture…ideas and feelings of the writers. When reading I stopped more than once, to learn about a new tradition, a word, a poem, an author, a new kind of music…It’s a window to new knowledge…' So, with fanfiction, it wasn’t just me who was improving my writing skills."
    • The New York Post was one of many sites trying to find stories related to Fifty Shades of Grey to coincide with the movie's release. In their case they found a fanfic writer to discuss pulling to publish and the merits of the fic as originally written. "But many in the fanficton.net community are confused and concerned by James’ success. 'The prose style, the dialogue — it was very juvenile. It was very simplistic,' says Karen, a 50-year-old administrator from Phoenix who uses the name piewacket on the site and recalls reading James’ original posts."
    • A different look at fanfic was provided by the OTW's Kristina Busse in a post at How We Get to Next. There she argued against separating fanfiction from communities. "Star Trek also became 'trans-fannish' very quickly, Busse explained, intermingling with followers of other series. 'In the 1970s conventions started to include Doctor Who, and by the 1980s you have entire zines that are nothing but crossovers. It moved beyond the specific show; people would become fannish butterflies where they would go from one fandom to another.' In doing so, they brought with them characters, plots and settings — and also tropes."

    How do you define fanfiction and what has it brought to your life? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Advice

    By Janita Burgess on Thursday, 19 February 2015 - 5:51pm
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    OTW Fannews Banner Fandom Advice by Bremo

    • One fanfiction reader turned writer based on his wife's advice as reported by Houma Today. "Nearly 15 years ago, Caldwell discovered online discussion boards and began reading fan fiction... Barbara, his wife of 16 years, inquired about his reading material. 'He said it was Jane Austen fan fiction, and he explained it to me... He told me about the stories out there, and he would critique them. As we were reading them, he kept saying ‘They missed it.' or ‘They left this hole here.' Finally, I had enough of that, and I said ‘Prove it. Prove that you can write better.'"
    • One mother tried to advise her daughter to abandon the stalking aspects of her fannishness. "'You know being a fan girl is a little bit like being a stalker,' I explained gently. 'But me and my friends like being stalkers,' laughed my teen. 'I just wish they would stalk me back!' Weeks later my daughter's phone was cut off and when I rang the phone company to enquire why they said she'd overrun her call limit with texts and calls to America. Knowing my child didn't know anyone Stateside I guessed her 'fangirling' was behind it... I confiscated my teen's phone and banned her from all fangirling for a week. Monitoring my child's ability to stalk wasn't something I'd have added to the list of 'mothering skills' but it's on there today."
    • The Ask Weezy advice column for teens gave advice more directly when it received a question from a Fanfiction.net user. The writer was worried about a friend he met there visiting him because his parents didn't know he regularly visited the site.
    • Blogger Jenny Cee posted advice about software and apps that would make fannish life easier. "Are you freaking tired of seeing that one ship come up over and over again as you trying to find a good fic read? Is there that one trope you can not stand, and if you see it one more time you will just lose it? Then yeah, then go ahead and install the greasemonkey (firefox) or tampermonkey (chrome), and scoot your butt over to the Greasy Fork and install the A03 savior. It’s has a bit of learning curve, but they are some helpful tutorials on how to set it up."

    What advice have you seen fans giving eachother? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Uluslararası Hayran Eserleri Günü Geldi !

    By Priscilla Del Cima on Wednesday, 18 February 2015 - 6:24am
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    Ania tarafından hazırlanan, cosplay, metinsel ve görsel sanatlar gibi çeşitli hayran eserlerine sahip afiş

    Zaman geldi! Bugün her türlü hayran eserinin kutlaması yapılan yıllık Uluslararası Hayran Eserleri Günü’nün ilki. Aşağıda OTW’nin (Transformatif Eserler Derneği) sponsorloğunu yapan ya da OTW ile bağlantısı bulunan bazı şeylerin listesi var ancak bize yorumlar kısmında bildiğiniz başka olay ya da etkinlik varsa bildirirseniz biz de duyurabiliriz.

    1. #IFDrabble adlı bir kısa hayran eseri meydan okuması düzenliyoruz. Tabletinizi, dizüstü bilgisayarınızı ya da telefonunuzu alın ve hayran eserlerini kutlamak için en fazla 100 kelime yazın! (Neden 100 kelime?)

      En sevdiğiniz karakter—ya da en sevdiğiniz çift—neye hayranlık duyuyor?

      • Tony Stark gizlice Transformers hayran filmlerini izliyor—ve seviyor—mu?
      • Athos, Aramis/Porthos çiftini destekliyor mu?
      • Shinee üyeleri Final Fantasy karakterlerinin cosplayini yapıyorlar mı?

      Ancak meydan okumamız sadece yazmak üzerine değil — meydan okuma için bir drawble (resimli kısa hikaye), kısa bir video, sesli bir eser ya da farklı formatta bir eser de gönderebilirsiniz. Kutlamaların bir parçası olarak bugün gönderin.

      Bulmamıza ve paylaşmamıza yardım edin — tumblr, Facebook, Dreamwidth ya da neredeyseniz orada #IFDrabble etiketiyle paylaşın. (Ve eğer Archive of Our Own – AO3’te (Kendimize Ait Bir Arşiv) paylaşırsanız, Uluslararası Hayran Eserleri Günü 2015 etiketiyle paylaşın.)

      Uygunsuz içerik kullanmazsanız biz de duyurabiliriz!

    2. Geribildirim Festivali: Hayran eserleri yaratan ve paylaşan herkes, onları beğenen insanların düşüncelerini duymayı sever. Geribildirim bıraktığınız eserlerin linkini yorum olarak bırakarak siz de katılın. Bu şekilde hayran eserlerinde sevdiğiniz şeyleri paylaşabilir ve başkalarını da geribildirim bırakmaya yönlendirebilirsiniz.
    3. 8 Şubat’ta yazarlar Cecilia Tan, Tara Sue Me ve Racheline Maltese ile birlikte"Why Fanworks Should Be Celebrated" (Hayran Eserleri Neden Kutlanmalı) üzerine canlı sohbet etkinliği yaptık. Bütün bu yazarlar hayran kurgusu yazarak başladı ve daha sonra eserleri basıldı—ve hala hayran eserleri içinde yer alıyorlar. Panelistler moderatör Francesca Coppa ile birlikte her türlü hayran eserinin değerini ve önemini tartıştı. Eğer kaçırdıysanız hala transkripti okuyabilirsiniz.
    4. Başkaları da Uluslararası Hayran Eserleri Günü hakkında konuşuyor. Bunun hakkında okuyup dinleyebileceğiniz bazı yerler:

    Ayrıca aşağıdaki hayran kutlamalarından haberdarız:

    Uluslararası Hayran Eserleri Günü’nün kutlandığı daha fazla yerden bahsedin!

  • Internationella dagen för verk av fans är här!

    By Priscilla Del Cima on Saturday, 14 February 2015 - 7:38pm
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    Decembers förhandstitt på International Fanworks Day

    Dagen är kommen! Idag är den första årliga Internationella dagen för verk av fans, en dag då vi hyllar fans och alla deras verk. En lista följer nedan på lite olika saker som OTW (Organisationen för Transformativa Verk) sponsrar eller är kopplade till. Vi vill gärna att du lämnar en kommentar och berättar för oss om andra händelser eller saker du vet om inför dagen så att vi kan ge dig PR.

    1. Vi står värd för en utmaning för korta verk, #IFDrabble. Sätt på din platta, din laptop eller din smartphone och skriv upp till 100 ord som hyllar verk av fans! (Varför 100 ord?)

      Vad är din favoritkaraktär – eller ditt favoritpar – ett fan av?

      • Tittar Tony Stark i hemlighet på – och älskar – fanfilmer för Transformers?
      • Vill Athos para ihop Aramis och Porthos?
      • Klär medlemmarna i Shiree ut sig i cosplay som Final Fantasy-karaktärer?

      Men vår utmaning går inte bara ut på att skriva – du kan göra en drawble, en kort video, ljudfil eller något annat format till utmaningen istället. Bara lägg upp det idag som en del av hyllningen.

      Hjälp oss hitta den och dela den — tagga den med #IFDrabble på tumblr, Facebook, Dreamwidth, eller varhelst du har din fandomaktivitet. (Och om du lägger upp den på Archive of Our Own – AO3 (Vårt Eget Arkiv), tagga den med International Fanworks Day 2015.)

      Håll det någorlunda barntillåtet så kanske vi ger dig extra PR!

    2. Feedback-Fest: Alla som skapar och delar verk av fans älskar att höra av personerna som haft glädje av dem, så vi står värd för en Feedback-fest för att hylla verken vi älskar. Delta genom att lämna en kommentar här med en länk till verk som du har lämnat feedback på. På det sättet kan du dela det du älskar i verk av fans, samtidigt som du uppmundrar även andra att lämna feedback.
    3. 8 februari hade vi en chatt vid namn "Why Fanworks Should Be Celebrated" (“Varför verk av fans bör hyllas”), med författarna Cecilia Tan, Tara Sue Me, och Racheline Maltese. Alla dessa författare började sin karriär med att skriva fanfiction och har gått vidare till att publicera professionella verk – och de deltar fortfarande i fandom. Tillsammans med moderatorn Francesca Coppa diskuterade panelen hur värdefulla och viktiga alla sorters verk av fans är. Om du missade det kan du fortfarande läsa chattloggen.
    4. Andra har också pratat om Internationella dagen för verk av fans. Här är några ställen där du kan läsa och höra om det:

    Vi känner också till följande hyllningar bland fans:

    Berätta för oss om du känner till fler platser där de firar Internationella dagen för verk av fans!

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