Fannish Practices

  • OTW Fannews: Small Scale Fandom

    By Janita Burgess on Thursday, 18 December 2014 - 6:34pm
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    Banner by Rachel of a generic Newspaper banner with the OTW logo and the words OTW Fannews

    • The Baker Orange featured a campus fangirl who discussed her fannish history. "Although she chooses to forget about her fangirling over the Twilight series, she says it was the show that 'started it all.' When she went to the midnight premier for the first movie, the atmosphere of the event really turned her on to the idea of being a fangirl. 'It was a bunch of fans getting together. I think thats what made it so much fun because everybody was there because they wanted to see the movie the second it came out... Then I realized that there were fandoms for tv shows and books, all the fun stuff... It’s really easy to get so involved with it when your on social media. It makes it a lot easier to freak out with people who understand."
    • Wisconsin Public Radio's Central Time show featured a fanfiction discussion in which a few guests and callers discussed being fanfic writers. Asked if there were interactions with her readers one writer said, "There is and sometimes it's not always an equivalent exchange, because once you post something it's out there whether or not you want critique or commentary, once it's out there you're going to get that critique. If it's something where I'm working with someone because I do co-write with a friend, we do a lot of give and take. Or I may post a snippet and say "I'm stuck with this idea...if you were writing this what would you do?" (No transcript available).
    • ZeeNews India was among several sites discussing an upcoming documentary on Rajinikanth fans. Said co-producer Rinku Kalsy, "Joyjeet Pal...who is also the producer of the documentary, used to tell me how small kids in Rajini's state are affected by his stardom... They aspire to be like his characters portrayed in the film. How they look up to Rajini and parents are also happy with their children's decision of becoming like him. So, we thought we should explore this further."
    • AV Club wrote about a Super Heroes vs. Game Heroes video on YouTube. "It’s essentially a fan film with deeply committed cosplayers mixing it up and uttering various catchphrases or obvious dialogue for their characters, but the clever conceits (one of the Minecraft bricks being the Tesseract, dimension jumping, and the resolution of the fight) elevate it beyond most fan creations. The special effects are especially impressive for this short film, with many aspects of the games and movie versions of these characters being perfectly replicated by a much smaller studio."

    What details about fandom make it personal for you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrities & Fandom Risks

    By Janita Burgess on Friday, 12 December 2014 - 5:26pm
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    Drawing of spotlights withtext in the style of the Hollywood sign that reads OTW Fannews Celebrities and Fandom Risks

    • Discussions about celebrity fandom have popped up on various sites, such as The Guardian's article about the lessons learned from allegations against Bill Cosby. "Before the internet, when the shroud of celebrity mystique was easier to maintain...fans felt less complicit in continuing to swoon over and patronize icons who were rumored to have done heinous things...But now, with bystanders always on hand to serve as amateur chroniclers and distributors of celebrity missteps and misdeeds, it’s hard to obscure or deny to fans what they’ve seen with their own eyes."
    • At SB Nation a similar discussion took place over social issues and sports fandom. "At times, hero worship of sports stars, or even teams as a whole, reaches a point where it can be described as something eerily similar to a cult of personality. That's a culture that can preclude educated opinions on and well-informed public discourse of serious issues involving said star or team. Examples of worst-case scenarios, like those at Steubenville and Penn State, which involve crimes that should still churn stomachs upon reflection, not only harbored such evil acts, but also led to their attempted cover-ups."
    • The Queen's University Journal explored why a connection with celebrities seems to exist. "Spitzberg co-authored an article and study titled 'Fanning the Flames of Fandom: Celebrity Worship, Parasocial Interaction, and Stalking'." In a 2001 study "[s]eventy-five per cent noted they’ve experienced 'strong attachments to more than one celebrity'...'[Parasocial interaction is] the idea that we develop relationships with people who we experience in the media, in much the same sort of way that we experience relationships with people in real life.'"
    • Fandom can be risky for many in more physical ways, whether for Russian women in football fandom or Chinese fans in slash fiction fandom. "'The law doesn’t differentiate between dan mei and gay fiction in any way,' says a 28-year-old writer who asked not to be identified by name. In his view, crackdowns are a function of political whims, 'so if the government decides it’s going to crack down on gay-related content, it’ll just cast a wide net and go for dan mei, too.'"

    What aspects of fandom have troubled you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom in the Streets

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 30 November 2014 - 6:25pm
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    • Arizona State University's The State Press reported on the PBS nerdwalk in Tempe. The walk "celebrated scientists, mathematicians, Whovians, Cumberbabes, those 'Down for Downton Abbey' and more. The crowd of gold shirts, costumed heroes and cosplayers were led by a team of unicyclers in a show of nerdom appreciation." Its organizer said "'Everybody’s a nerd for something...It doesn’t matter what you’re a nerd for, if you have a passion for chemistry, if you have a passion for vector calculus, if you have a passion for comic books…everybody’s a nerd for something, we think that’s something to celebrate.'”
    • The Pensacola News Journal wrote about another effort to take fandom out of convention halls, the Pensacola Pop Expo. "Government Street was closed to vehicular traffic, and pop-up tents lined the street in front of the historic entertainment complex, allowing hundreds of people to mill about socializing and taking in sights...Cosplayers roamed the street, stopping to pose for pictures between stops at vendor booths. There were plenty of artists, but they were professional comic book artists not just selling art but talking to fans and signing autographs. And those vendor booths were selling nerdy treasures like comics, Funko Pop figurines and vintage video games." The event was funded "with a grant from Arts, Culture and Entertainment Inc., which administers grants to local arts groups. The nonprofit event served as a benefit for Manna Food Pantries."
    • A blog post at Project Muse talked about scenes in the city during the Frankfurt Book Fair. It "is divided into 'trade' days and 'public' days. The trade days, Wednesday through Friday, are full of publishing industry professionals engaged in business-to-business activities. The public is allowed in on Saturday and Sunday...I was at the fair on a public day. There were a lot of teenagers in costume! They were in the fair, on the subway, in the train station, and on the regional commuter trains. I guess it’s 'a thing' to get into character to go to the Book Fair." The post goes on to discuss the site's scholarly content on manga and anime which "shows up in religion, gender, political economy, history, futurism, media and censorship. Popular discussions around manga and anime often include cosplay, fandom (otaku in Japanese), and then bend around to nerd culture, science fiction, and the geek movement."
    • At Bleeding Cool, Hannah Means Shannon wrote about visiting Sleepy Hollow. "I got to see other people enjoying the Sleepy Hollow mythology, their reactions, and the way in which the town celebrates its name day...I now feel I understand better how the imagined past looms large in our present day, how we need it and seek it out at just about every possible opportunity. Washington Irving’s Sleepy Hollow is the quintessential Halloween story just as Dickens’ Christmas Carol is a quintessential Christmas story, a fan favorite for reasons. We can make it our own, and choose to take part in it and that’s down the accessibility of the original material and the creativity of generations of storytellers bringing it to life in new ways for us. And we then follow their lead and address the roots of the tales again to make them our own."

    Where have you unexpectedly run across fandom? Write about your experiences in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom From End to End

    By Janita Burgess on Monday, 24 November 2014 - 5:44pm
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    OTW Fannews Banner Fandom End to End

    • In a post for The Guardian, Erin Riley talks bout the ethics of sports fandom. "Ethical issues may be particularly acute in horse racing, but being a sport fan can regularly involve navigating an ethical minefield. For some fans, it’s the relationship between their particular code or club and gambling. For others, it’s the decisions made by the management of their team that don’t sit well with their values. It can be an appointment of a particular player, the sacking of a coach or the attempt to cover up a scandal. There are almost as many different responses to these issues as there are issues themselves. Fans are forced to figure out a way to respond that weighs the values they hold against the teams or sport they love."
    • On the flip side, at Hardwood Paroxysm, the discussion is about how fannishness changes over time. "It’s something for us to look forward too, a way to spend time with and connect to our friends and family, and generally just a way to remove ourselves from the real world for a certain number of hours a week. And part of why it’s so appealing, besides the reasons listed above, is that spectacle aspect of it. Here are these people that, through the genetic lottery (and hard work as well), are able to do things the vast majority of the human race could never dream of...Everyone wants to be tall and strong and in shape, because life is so much easier when you have those three things working for you."
    • The Baltimore Sun featured the century-plus appeal of Sherlock Holmes fandom. "Watson's Tin Box began in Ellicott City in 1989 and is considered a scion society of the Baker Street Irregulars. Its named recalls the box where Watson collected his reports of Sherlock's investigations." One of its founders, "Churchill put together the original collection of artifact boxes, one for each story, that recall details of the story. Some items are antiques, period pieces that reflect Sherlock's times: period checks, blank telegram forms or hotel bills. Other things are 'genuine faux originals.' If he couldn't find a letter or a ticket, he'd create it."
    • Scholar Lori Morimoto looked at more recent developments involving fandom memes and official production. "And it’s this cover that I find all but impossible to discuss through frameworks of appropriation and clearly defined fan-producer identities and relations. A cursory glance at Mizutama’s Twitter images demonstrates the meme’s affective appeal to her, and in this sense its inclusion in the official book cover art seems as much sly in-joke as appropriation. Indeed, the decentralized context of the book’s production – produced by the longtime publisher of both Arthur Conan Doyle works in Japanese and the long-running Hayakawa Mystery magazine, written by Holmes aficionado Kitahara, and illustrated by present-day Sherlock fan Mizutama – begs the questions of where we locate ‘production’, and how we might conceptualize ‘monetization’ here."

    From fandom history to fandom passions, Fanlore is there for it all. Add your contributions!

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fitting in Fanworks

    By Janita Burgess on Thursday, 13 November 2014 - 5:32pm
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    OTW Fannews Banner Fitting in Fanworks

    • Blogger Marie Larsen wrote about her daughter's classroom success in writing fanfiction. "The story is a Transformers fan fiction piece, long enough and worthy enough of being an animated episode." But she was "concerned of its fan fiction style. Recently, I read Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, where the main character received a failing grade from a teacher that didn't find any value in fan fiction. I wasn't sure how my girl's teacher would receive this piece." However, her story had a happy ending. "To praise her in front of her peers, to give her the only A+ out of all those very bright, accelerated students was a self-esteem booster I could never give her."
    • Dorkly featured 15 People Who Turned Wheelchairs Into Amazing Cosplay, including the Black Knight, Superman, Wall-E and General Loveless.
    • Engadget was one among many that featured a remake of The Empire Strikes Back utilizing fan clips. More than 480 fan-made segments were picked from over 1,500 submissions to make The Empire Strikes Back Uncut. The result included a mash-up of styles including live action, animation, and stop-motion.
    • The Blacktown Sun wrote about the fanfiction generated in a creative writing program. "Year 8 student Ashleigh's 27-chapter novel, Collision Course, was an extension of a fan fiction she wrote based on YouTube gamers Mitch and Jerome, known for their Minecraft reviews. 'I took the real people and twisted them to make characters that would fit the universe of the story,' she said." Meanwhile "Year 10 student Kate's 11,000-word novel The Fantastic Not-so-Real World of Samantha Colt balanced macabre, dark elements inspired by the Martin Scorsese film Shutter Island with bookish fantasy inspired by the film Inkheart."

    What fanworks have you fit into your life? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction For the Win

    By Janita Burgess on Thursday, 11 September 2014 - 4:54pm
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    OTW Fannews Fanfiction for the Win

    • At Crushable Jill O’Rourke discussed how much entertainment is fanfic. "Fanfiction is also present on TV. I’ll give you one flawless example: the entire Once Upon a Time series. It’s practically a show about fanfiction, as it deals with literal alternate universes, multiple versions of characters within the same story, original characters, and crossovers between countless fairy tales, shipping included (and I mean that in the 'They should kiss' way, not in the 'buying something on Amazon' way). People have then gone a step further and written fanfiction around Once Upon a Time. Fanfic-ception!"
    • Blogger Alan Verill wrote about Fan Fiction, Writing, and the Learning Process. "Anyway, all of this to say that perhaps our first reaction to reading someone's lousy fan fiction should not be to mock them. Perhaps we, as a community of writers and readers, should actually be encouraging people to learn and try and grow, as opposed to crushing them under the heel of our Internet mockery. And yeah, I know that's pretty much what the Internet has become these days -- a giant room where everyone takes meth and grabs megaphones and screams at each other without pause. I just think it would be better if we all endeavored to change that, even if only in some kind of small and subtle way."
    • Fictorians posted about trying to become a writer. "If I had it to do over, I’m tempted to say that I’d push myself to start submitting my work sooner. I’m not sure, though, how to pinpoint the time in my life where I was mature enough to not interpret a rejection as a portent of doom, personal insult, or sign of my complete and incurable ineptitude. I’m also grateful for the epic saga I wrote that taught me yes, I do have the ability to write a book’s worth of material. So instead, I’d tell myself to keep in mind that fandom is not a career."
    • At The Mary Sue Emmy Ellis defended badfic. "I’m going to stand up for 'terrible' fanfiction, in all its bizarrities and failures. I’m going to stand up for smut and slash, for utterly pointless fluff, for high school and college alternate universes, for crossovers of either characters or entire worlds, and – I’ll try – for crackfic. You know, the kinds of fanfiction that are brought up when folks try to tar and feather the whole medium with a broad brush. If you bear with me, I might even go so far as to mount a defense for badly-written and ill-conceived fanfiction. And, for your convenience, I’ll do so in that order."

    What fanfiction has made a difference to you? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Terms in Use

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Friday, 29 August 2014 - 4:57pm
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    • As fandom has become more visible, the terms it uses have spread out into new areas. At this point various bands have written songs titled "Fan fiction" and Australian musician Geoffrey O'Connor has recently titled a whole album "Fan Fiction", while there is also a band with the same name.
    • In one of a constant stream of fanwork contests across the web, Vita.mn discussed their fanfiction entries and made some curious claims. "After weeding out the slashfic (which is to regular fan fiction what '50 Shades' is to 'Twilight')...'Second Player' tells the tale of the Mario Bros. from Luigi’s perspective — only they’re not actually brothers in this otherwise spot-on continuity nod. They’re a couple who fell in love in the days before Pride Parades and Rainbow Road Races, and had no choice but to disguise the true nature of their relationship or face the scorn of the Mushroom Kingdom. If you’re worried that this sounds like slashfic, don’t be. It’s a well-crafted original take on a beloved video-game icon and his less celebrated brother, and it traces their lives together in a way that leaves you rethinking every Mario-branded game you’ve ever button-mashed your way through. The goal of any great piece of fanfic is to enhance the original work, so read 'Second Player,' then go back and play 'Super Mario Bros.' and see if you don’t find it a little more interesting and far more tragic."
    • In an interview with IT expert Taylor Judd about password security, he discussed hacker strategies using a fandom example. "So they'll say, 'Ok it's Joe Schmoe Password123 on Battlestar Galactica fan fiction, the first thing I'm going to do when I see that is I'm going to go to gmail.com and see if that username and password works there." (No transcript available).
    • Of course, fandom is constantly inventing new terms as seen at Richard Armitage Frenzy. "Fandom forensics is when a fangirl (or fanboy) goes into detail mode to solve a mystery. What happened?! When?! Who did it?! Who was there?! Did the tie have a tie clip?! If so, whose was it?!"

    What fandom terms have you seen used (or misused)? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Defining Fans

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Sunday, 3 August 2014 - 5:29pm
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    Banner by Alice of a magnifying glass enlarging the post title with a ruler on the right banner side. Text reads OTW Fannews Defining Fans
    • In The Washington Post Alyssa Rosenberg claimed that political discourse was taking over cultural conversations. "We treat people whose interpretations differ from our own as if they are acting in bad faith...we demand that significant figures in cultural commentary have something to say about every big event so we can check their reactions against our sense of what they ought to feel to remain in good standing. It is impossible to measure membership in fan communities the same way we measure party registration or church membership and attendance. As social media has made conversations that once took place in fanzines and on message boards more visible, it has become quite common for users to include the teams they root for, the shows they watch religiously and the movie and book franchises they love in their online biographies, along with information about their work and family lives."
    • A number of fans objected to their portrait in regards to Dashcon by Alex Goldman at TLDR. "What is there to learn from this? Well, it speaks a bit to the nature of interaction on the web and how poorly it can translate to the real world. So much of fandom is organic and has a sort of perpetual motion to it. It requires no organization. Fandoms mutate, coalesce around certain concepts and ideas, and slowly change over time. And if you want, say, Scott McCall to fall in love with Jacob Black in the bathroom at a Denny’s in Lawrence, Kansas, you don’t need to consult anyone. You can just will it into existence. If people like it, it will become part of fan canon."
    • Meanwhile, the Baltimore Post Examiner suggested the problem was focusing a con on a social media site. "While I have no experience in running conventions, I do have quite a bit in fandom. And that’s what this was, really: a fandom convention, just for the fandoms that Tumblr thinks are popular. The key word here is 'thinks.' The top category of content on Tumblr, according to founder David Karp? Fashion. The amount of fashion-related events and panels at Dashcon? Two. But hey, a lot of people are vocal about liking these British TV shows, so let’s put that on our top priority!"
    • While fans define themselves by their passions, Wikia is trying to quantify fans for others, claiming they fall into nine personality profiles. They also provide data on their users. "Wikia's fan base is more dedicated, influential and valuable than other social platforms in a variety of instances. Wikia fans are 71% more likely to play video games for over 20 hours per week (compared to Facebook's -1%, YouTube's 8% and Twitter's 17%); Wikia fans are 106% more likely to consume over five movies in theaters in the past month (compared to Facebook's 17%, YouTube's 35% and Twitter's 66%); Wikia fans are 201% more likely to have spent over $200 on online music in the past six months (compared to Facebook's 42%, YouTube's 43% and Twitter's 67%)."

    How do you define fandom, and what events were key to your view? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Investigating Fandom

    By Janita Burgess on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 - 4:48pm
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    • At Research Hazel Robinson discussed how fandom works. "Everyone behaves slightly differently online. So in the same way that a blogger might be more confessional on the internet than they would be in their office, fans will be sillier, more obscene in the privacy of a secluded online spot. The specific behaviours of fans will vary a lot from medium to medium though. Some fans might be quite coy on Twitter, as that’s often used for more cross-fandom/experience discussion and feels more public, whereas they’d be very open and in-depth about their fandom on a specific message-board or community."
    • The New Republic posted about fandom ethics in relation to the World Cup. "Objecting citizens may be overlooking the fact that students all over the world are learning about Brazilian arts, letters, and philosophy due to the attention brought upon the country by the World Cup. For example, this past semester, a student in my course on Latin American thought at Brooklyn College argued that the World Cup in fact represented a serious threat to democracy, given the authoritarian policies installed to organize and realize the Cup. He cited Leonardo Boff, a Brazilian theologian and philosopher, as a source for his concept of a just, participatory democracy...trying to track down all the consequences of buying a ticket from FIFA, coming to Brazil, and participating in the business surrounding the World Cup is impossible and does not get to the heart of the matter."
    • GMA News Online posted about KPop fans and stans. "'Fandom is a fuel of trade,' said Catherine Deen, one of three scholars who spoke about the hallyu phenomenon in the forum 'The Hallyu Mosaic in the Philippines: Framing Perception and Praxis' at the Ateneo Initiative for Korean Studies Conference...last week. In their studies, Deen and fellow speakers Patrick Capili and Gilbert Que surveyed hundreds of fans and major KPop fanclubs in the Philippines, categorizing the fans based on their activities and level of affinity with their idols."
    • The Ogiue Maniax blog discussed American anime fandom. "Historically, anime has not needed its American fanbase. Sure, there have been a lot of viewers, but anime’s domestic market is Japan, and it also finds success around the world, in Europe, South America, and Asia. The US certainly has an online presence when it comes to anime discussion and enthusiasm, but over the years it’s been easy to get the impression that this fandom is a paper tiger, especially when it comes to popular shows among the internet fandom not translating to home video sales...Now, however, not only are American viewers tuning in to catch Toonami and its latest anime, but the shows people are most interested in are also the ones that have developed large fanbases online as well."

    What parts of fandom history do you remember? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: To fan or not to fan

    By Kiri Van Santen on Thursday, 3 July 2014 - 4:48pm
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    • An L.A. Weekly article on why musician John Roderick couldn't be a fan brought about a number of responses. "[T]here was a turning point somewhere at the end of grade school where kids started lining up behind brands. I mean, I read Mad magazine, but I wouldn't have called myself a fan; the whole point of Mad was that they were ripping you off and laughing at you. The British invasion bands kinda smirked at their fans, too. My fandom pretty much stopped at the door. I owned the records, what else was I supposed to do?...Maybe that's what I dislike about fandom: commitment. I never wanted to be so tied to a band that I couldn't pull back."
    • Writer Jessica Khoury wrote at NPR about what Harry Potter brought to her life. "Did I lose some friends? I did. I remember telling some that I'd read the books and even liked them, and in shock they'd declared our friendship over, that we'd never speak again. And it was true, we never did — but to my surprise, I found myself relieved. I never once missed them. I heard others whispering Did you hear that Jessica read Harry Potter? and I smiled. Years later, I would sit in a theater with some of those same friends — and even my parents — for the opening night screening of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Years later, I'd find myself holding a butterbeer and crying in the middle of Hogsmeade at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, because here was where it all began. Here was the beginning of my autonomy."
    • The Austin Chronicle claimed that the ATX Television Festival "caters to – and initiates – a new kind of fandom", saying it's "hitting its stride with audiences who increasingly view, review, and talk about TV the way they view, review, and talk about film. Around 1,200 of what co-founders Emily Gipson and Caitlin McFarland alternately call 'quality television viewers' and 'DVD extra fans' are...the viewers for whom ATXTVF was created. 'They're fans, but they're interested in the industry,' says McFar­land. 'Showrunners and creators are their rock stars.'"
    • Arizona State University's news service profiled a faculty member who wrote about football fandom in Africa. "'It was very clear that people felt the vuvuzela was a fundamental threat to a specific Eurocentric version of football,' Kassing added. 'And therefore it was not seen, at least by most people commenting, as a legitimate or alternative fan tradition.' Those posting in defense of the vuvuzela used humor and irony to make their points. Comments included, 'Who let all the locals in, honking their strange instruments, dancing around and having a good time. Football should be watched in silence,' along with, 'The incessant droning noise completely destroys the pleasure of watching the sport on TV. Please ban Formula 1 immediately'."

    What made you become a fan? Write about your fannish history on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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