Fannish Practices

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction For the Win

    By Janita Burgess on Thursday, 11 September 2014 - 4:54pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews Fanfiction for the Win

    • At Crushable Jill O’Rourke discussed how much entertainment is fanfic. "Fanfiction is also present on TV. I’ll give you one flawless example: the entire Once Upon a Time series. It’s practically a show about fanfiction, as it deals with literal alternate universes, multiple versions of characters within the same story, original characters, and crossovers between countless fairy tales, shipping included (and I mean that in the 'They should kiss' way, not in the 'buying something on Amazon' way). People have then gone a step further and written fanfiction around Once Upon a Time. Fanfic-ception!"
    • Blogger Alan Verill wrote about Fan Fiction, Writing, and the Learning Process. "Anyway, all of this to say that perhaps our first reaction to reading someone's lousy fan fiction should not be to mock them. Perhaps we, as a community of writers and readers, should actually be encouraging people to learn and try and grow, as opposed to crushing them under the heel of our Internet mockery. And yeah, I know that's pretty much what the Internet has become these days -- a giant room where everyone takes meth and grabs megaphones and screams at each other without pause. I just think it would be better if we all endeavored to change that, even if only in some kind of small and subtle way."
    • Fictorians posted about trying to become a writer. "If I had it to do over, I’m tempted to say that I’d push myself to start submitting my work sooner. I’m not sure, though, how to pinpoint the time in my life where I was mature enough to not interpret a rejection as a portent of doom, personal insult, or sign of my complete and incurable ineptitude. I’m also grateful for the epic saga I wrote that taught me yes, I do have the ability to write a book’s worth of material. So instead, I’d tell myself to keep in mind that fandom is not a career."
    • At The Mary Sue Emmy Ellis defended badfic. "I’m going to stand up for 'terrible' fanfiction, in all its bizarrities and failures. I’m going to stand up for smut and slash, for utterly pointless fluff, for high school and college alternate universes, for crossovers of either characters or entire worlds, and – I’ll try – for crackfic. You know, the kinds of fanfiction that are brought up when folks try to tar and feather the whole medium with a broad brush. If you bear with me, I might even go so far as to mount a defense for badly-written and ill-conceived fanfiction. And, for your convenience, I’ll do so in that order."

    What fanfiction has made a difference to you? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Terms in Use

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Friday, 29 August 2014 - 4:57pm
    Message type:

    Magnifying glass over a dictionary with text that reads OTW Fannews Terms in Use
    • As fandom has become more visible, the terms it uses have spread out into new areas. At this point various bands have written songs titled "Fan fiction" and Australian musician Geoffrey O'Connor has recently titled a whole album "Fan Fiction", while there is also a band with the same name.
    • In one of a constant stream of fanwork contests across the web, Vita.mn discussed their fanfiction entries and made some curious claims. "After weeding out the slashfic (which is to regular fan fiction what '50 Shades' is to 'Twilight')...'Second Player' tells the tale of the Mario Bros. from Luigi’s perspective — only they’re not actually brothers in this otherwise spot-on continuity nod. They’re a couple who fell in love in the days before Pride Parades and Rainbow Road Races, and had no choice but to disguise the true nature of their relationship or face the scorn of the Mushroom Kingdom. If you’re worried that this sounds like slashfic, don’t be. It’s a well-crafted original take on a beloved video-game icon and his less celebrated brother, and it traces their lives together in a way that leaves you rethinking every Mario-branded game you’ve ever button-mashed your way through. The goal of any great piece of fanfic is to enhance the original work, so read 'Second Player,' then go back and play 'Super Mario Bros.' and see if you don’t find it a little more interesting and far more tragic."
    • In an interview with IT expert Taylor Judd about password security, he discussed hacker strategies using a fandom example. "So they'll say, 'Ok it's Joe Schmoe Password123 on Battlestar Galactica fan fiction, the first thing I'm going to do when I see that is I'm going to go to gmail.com and see if that username and password works there." (No transcript available).
    • Of course, fandom is constantly inventing new terms as seen at Richard Armitage Frenzy. "Fandom forensics is when a fangirl (or fanboy) goes into detail mode to solve a mystery. What happened?! When?! Who did it?! Who was there?! Did the tie have a tie clip?! If so, whose was it?!"

    What fandom terms have you seen used (or misused)? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Defining Fans

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Sunday, 3 August 2014 - 5:29pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Alice of a magnifying glass enlarging the post title with a ruler on the right banner side. Text reads OTW Fannews Defining Fans
    • In The Washington Post Alyssa Rosenberg claimed that political discourse was taking over cultural conversations. "We treat people whose interpretations differ from our own as if they are acting in bad faith...we demand that significant figures in cultural commentary have something to say about every big event so we can check their reactions against our sense of what they ought to feel to remain in good standing. It is impossible to measure membership in fan communities the same way we measure party registration or church membership and attendance. As social media has made conversations that once took place in fanzines and on message boards more visible, it has become quite common for users to include the teams they root for, the shows they watch religiously and the movie and book franchises they love in their online biographies, along with information about their work and family lives."
    • A number of fans objected to their portrait in regards to Dashcon by Alex Goldman at TLDR. "What is there to learn from this? Well, it speaks a bit to the nature of interaction on the web and how poorly it can translate to the real world. So much of fandom is organic and has a sort of perpetual motion to it. It requires no organization. Fandoms mutate, coalesce around certain concepts and ideas, and slowly change over time. And if you want, say, Scott McCall to fall in love with Jacob Black in the bathroom at a Denny’s in Lawrence, Kansas, you don’t need to consult anyone. You can just will it into existence. If people like it, it will become part of fan canon."
    • Meanwhile, the Baltimore Post Examiner suggested the problem was focusing a con on a social media site. "While I have no experience in running conventions, I do have quite a bit in fandom. And that’s what this was, really: a fandom convention, just for the fandoms that Tumblr thinks are popular. The key word here is 'thinks.' The top category of content on Tumblr, according to founder David Karp? Fashion. The amount of fashion-related events and panels at Dashcon? Two. But hey, a lot of people are vocal about liking these British TV shows, so let’s put that on our top priority!"
    • While fans define themselves by their passions, Wikia is trying to quantify fans for others, claiming they fall into nine personality profiles. They also provide data on their users. "Wikia's fan base is more dedicated, influential and valuable than other social platforms in a variety of instances. Wikia fans are 71% more likely to play video games for over 20 hours per week (compared to Facebook's -1%, YouTube's 8% and Twitter's 17%); Wikia fans are 106% more likely to consume over five movies in theaters in the past month (compared to Facebook's 17%, YouTube's 35% and Twitter's 66%); Wikia fans are 201% more likely to have spent over $200 on online music in the past six months (compared to Facebook's 42%, YouTube's 43% and Twitter's 67%)."

    How do you define fandom, and what events were key to your view? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Investigating Fandom

    By Janita Burgess on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 - 4:48pm
    Message type:

    Describe the image in this space for the visually impaired

    • At Research Hazel Robinson discussed how fandom works. "Everyone behaves slightly differently online. So in the same way that a blogger might be more confessional on the internet than they would be in their office, fans will be sillier, more obscene in the privacy of a secluded online spot. The specific behaviours of fans will vary a lot from medium to medium though. Some fans might be quite coy on Twitter, as that’s often used for more cross-fandom/experience discussion and feels more public, whereas they’d be very open and in-depth about their fandom on a specific message-board or community."
    • The New Republic posted about fandom ethics in relation to the World Cup. "Objecting citizens may be overlooking the fact that students all over the world are learning about Brazilian arts, letters, and philosophy due to the attention brought upon the country by the World Cup. For example, this past semester, a student in my course on Latin American thought at Brooklyn College argued that the World Cup in fact represented a serious threat to democracy, given the authoritarian policies installed to organize and realize the Cup. He cited Leonardo Boff, a Brazilian theologian and philosopher, as a source for his concept of a just, participatory democracy...trying to track down all the consequences of buying a ticket from FIFA, coming to Brazil, and participating in the business surrounding the World Cup is impossible and does not get to the heart of the matter."
    • GMA News Online posted about KPop fans and stans. "'Fandom is a fuel of trade,' said Catherine Deen, one of three scholars who spoke about the hallyu phenomenon in the forum 'The Hallyu Mosaic in the Philippines: Framing Perception and Praxis' at the Ateneo Initiative for Korean Studies Conference...last week. In their studies, Deen and fellow speakers Patrick Capili and Gilbert Que surveyed hundreds of fans and major KPop fanclubs in the Philippines, categorizing the fans based on their activities and level of affinity with their idols."
    • The Ogiue Maniax blog discussed American anime fandom. "Historically, anime has not needed its American fanbase. Sure, there have been a lot of viewers, but anime’s domestic market is Japan, and it also finds success around the world, in Europe, South America, and Asia. The US certainly has an online presence when it comes to anime discussion and enthusiasm, but over the years it’s been easy to get the impression that this fandom is a paper tiger, especially when it comes to popular shows among the internet fandom not translating to home video sales...Now, however, not only are American viewers tuning in to catch Toonami and its latest anime, but the shows people are most interested in are also the ones that have developed large fanbases online as well."

    What parts of fandom history do you remember? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: To fan or not to fan

    By Kiri Van Santen on Thursday, 3 July 2014 - 4:48pm
    Message type:

    • An L.A. Weekly article on why musician John Roderick couldn't be a fan brought about a number of responses. "[T]here was a turning point somewhere at the end of grade school where kids started lining up behind brands. I mean, I read Mad magazine, but I wouldn't have called myself a fan; the whole point of Mad was that they were ripping you off and laughing at you. The British invasion bands kinda smirked at their fans, too. My fandom pretty much stopped at the door. I owned the records, what else was I supposed to do?...Maybe that's what I dislike about fandom: commitment. I never wanted to be so tied to a band that I couldn't pull back."
    • Writer Jessica Khoury wrote at NPR about what Harry Potter brought to her life. "Did I lose some friends? I did. I remember telling some that I'd read the books and even liked them, and in shock they'd declared our friendship over, that we'd never speak again. And it was true, we never did — but to my surprise, I found myself relieved. I never once missed them. I heard others whispering Did you hear that Jessica read Harry Potter? and I smiled. Years later, I would sit in a theater with some of those same friends — and even my parents — for the opening night screening of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Years later, I'd find myself holding a butterbeer and crying in the middle of Hogsmeade at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, because here was where it all began. Here was the beginning of my autonomy."
    • The Austin Chronicle claimed that the ATX Television Festival "caters to – and initiates – a new kind of fandom", saying it's "hitting its stride with audiences who increasingly view, review, and talk about TV the way they view, review, and talk about film. Around 1,200 of what co-founders Emily Gipson and Caitlin McFarland alternately call 'quality television viewers' and 'DVD extra fans' are...the viewers for whom ATXTVF was created. 'They're fans, but they're interested in the industry,' says McFar­land. 'Showrunners and creators are their rock stars.'"
    • Arizona State University's news service profiled a faculty member who wrote about football fandom in Africa. "'It was very clear that people felt the vuvuzela was a fundamental threat to a specific Eurocentric version of football,' Kassing added. 'And therefore it was not seen, at least by most people commenting, as a legitimate or alternative fan tradition.' Those posting in defense of the vuvuzela used humor and irony to make their points. Comments included, 'Who let all the locals in, honking their strange instruments, dancing around and having a good time. Football should be watched in silence,' along with, 'The incessant droning noise completely destroys the pleasure of watching the sport on TV. Please ban Formula 1 immediately'."

    What made you become a fan? Write about your fannish history on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Creations

    By Kiri Van Santen on Thursday, 19 June 2014 - 5:29pm
    Message type:

    fandom creations

    • io9 traced the history of the term 'meta'. "Today, the word meta has undergone another transformation, largely because of the intensely self-referential fandom community online... This has meant that many shows have meta episodes that are basically fan service. So meta has become a popular trope, and fans have responded by using the term meta to describe these kinds of episodes. But more importantly, fans have transformed the word meta yet again, turning it from an adjective that describes a kind of story into a noun that refers to a form of fan commentary. These days, any essay, rant, or analysis written by a fan is often dubbed 'a meta.'"
    • Gizmodo highlighted a Blade Runner Tribute Art Show which "brought some really succulent Blade Runner fanfiction along with it. On display starting at 7PM on May 31st at the Bottleneck Gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn Moments Lost will feature...eight unique stories based off of the Blade Runner mythos. Each story matches up with an individual original track off the CD created by Analogue Sweeden, as well as a piece artwork on display."
    • All Geek to Me began a feature about fandom tattoos. "You know you are a serious geek when you get your love for a fandom etched into your skin. Fandom Ink is all about celebrating your geek ink and most importantly, finding out the story about why you got that tattoo! We here at All Geek to Me love a good story and awesome art, thus this new column that will be featuring awesome tattoos."
    • A post at Kentucky Sports Radio encouraged readers to write fanfiction and offered some ideas. "In this issue we celebrate the 2013 Reds baseball season as we prepare for the Reds to repeat as champions! We all remember the dominance of Cueto and Chapman last postseason, as well as the heroics from Joey Votto, whose hitting with runners in scoring position was fantastic. After beating the Pirates in the WildCard Playoff (a game they just couldn’t have choked away, they never do that!) the RedLegs began their magical run to the World Series where they beat the Red Sox in six games."

    What fandom creations have stuck with you? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction in the lexicon

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 8 June 2014 - 4:43pm
    Message type:

    Banner by James of a quill pen resting on a sheet of paper with writing on it

    • Gamescene hosted a paper on Fanfiction as Critical Play. "By allowing the larger fan community to access and interact with the fanfiction, the piece contributes to the larger agency of the fans over the source universe. This allows for more fans to participate in the remolding of a fiction that they did not create, examining societal, cultural, political, and personal themes through both the inherently subversive act of writing fanfiction, and through the content and themes contained within the individual fanfiction. The fanfiction writer employs concepts such as unplaying, reskinning, and rewriting in order to acknowledge and further explore the subversive elements of their version of the source. This makes fanfiction a form of critical play."
    • The Asian Age discussed Bollywood fanfiction. “'The joy lies in weaving new narratives with the characters you love,' says Aayat Malik, a DU student and Fanfiction writer whose present work-in-progress brings Harry Potter’s Patil twins to Mumbai after completing their magical education at Hogwarts, also incorporating characters from the recent Hindi movie, Hasee Toh Phasee...She goes on to point out how visiting many popular Indian entertainment websites brings to notice that the largest volume in terms of the sheer number and length of Fanfiction writings exists in the realm of Indian television."
    • Gizmodo explained design fanfiction. "There's actually an existing analog for this trend: Fanfiction. The comparison isn't as far flung as it seems. It's just where fanfic writers turn their own creativity upon existing characters and plot lines from their favorite books or TV shows, designers turn to their favorite Brands. Spec episodes of My Little Pony and ludicrous concepts for the next iPhone have a lot in common."
    • Various media outlets took note of the fannish terms, such as fangirl, being added to the dictionary by Merriam-Webster. The Times of India devoted some time to explaining 'shipping'. "Usually, fans will give a couple their own moniker, often a portmanteau of their names. X-Files fans liked to use Sculder or MSR (quite simply Mulder-Scully Romance). Any kind of relationship can be acknowledged. From the obvious 'will they, won't they' couples to inter-species intimacy, one rule of the shipping community is that if at least one person wants to see a certain pairing, then it's a legitimate ship. Nor is it limited to modern-day culture; you'll find sites dedicated to shipping the heroes and heroines of classic literature, such as Jo and Laurie in Little Women."

    What fanfiction terms have you learned about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Changing how things are done

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 31 May 2014 - 4:38pm
    Message type:

    • PBS's Idea Channel did a piece on "The Future of Fandom" and featured discussion about fans' effects on copyright, including the stance of the OTW and the work of OTW legal staffer, Rebecca Tushnet. "In 'I'm a Lawyer, Not an Ethnographer, Jim': Textual Poachers and Fair Use, Rebecca Tushnet explains Henry Jenkins' sense that 'fans usually enjoy [an original work], but also see its flaws and gaps, which their work attempts to address and, sometimes, redress.' Fan works like Fanfic, fanvids and remixes celebrate, critique and extend beloved media, but they also exist in uncertain legal territory. They're necessarily built on copyrighted material, the owners of which are occasionally super hostile to any co-option, even loving co-option." (Transcript available)
    • While not directly connected to fandom, a recent court ruling raised concerns about what can be published about people online. NPR's All Things Considered discussed the potential changes. "Usually, the content that we talk about with the right to be forgotten is much more salacious. This guy wanted an old debt to be removed from his Google search results. He took his complaint to the Spanish Data Protection Agency, who determined that he did have a case for the right to be forgotten. And the agency ordered Google to remove links to that content. It moved through the courts as Google appealed it and the case that came down was shocking, I think, for most people."
    • Another court ruling included discussion about fan sites and works more specifically. The Supreme Court ruled on the case of Petrella v. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, a case in which the owner of a screenplay alleged copyright infringement. In her opinion, Justice Ginsburg stated the following: "[T]here is nothing untoward about waiting to see whether an infringer’s exploitation undercuts the value of the copyrighted work, has no effect on the original work, or even complements it. Fan sites prompted by a book or film, for example, may benefit the copyright owner. See Wu, Tolerated Use, 31 Colum. J. L. & Arts 617, 619–620 (2008). Even if an infringement is harmful, the harm may be too small to justify the cost of litigation."
    • While some think that fanfiction should be licensed in the future, the Deseret News wrote about Lucasfilm's decision to wipe out earlier canon, turning it into licensed fanfic. "Lucasfilm announced the Star Wars Story Group in January, which was created specifically to sift through the plethora of Expanded Universe content and decide what was and wasn’t canon, according to BleedingCool.com. The answer? Apparently none of it was. But it’s not all bad news for Expanded Universe fans...Instead, it will be rebranded as 'Star Wars Legends' and continue to be published and made available to fans."

    What examples of fans' changing things have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom and food

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 24 May 2014 - 3:27pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Ania of the edge of a food plate

    • Singapore Showbiz wrote about the rise of TV-themed dinners surrounding fandoms with a strong focus on food. "Passionate fans have even taken it upon themselves to create a Game of Thrones' cookbook...with recipes for the dishes described in the series." The group featured has "plans for more TV- themed dinners, with plans for 'The Hunger Games', 'Downton Abbey', and 'Hannibal' dinners in the works."
    • As an article on KDrama Stars points out, fan meetings with or without food are hardly new. The Korean Drama Group started as a yahoo group in 2003 and has been meeting annually. Its fans discussed how their interest branched out from TV shows. "Some of the group's members have been inspired to learn more about Korean culture. Some take language and Korean cooking lessons. Some members of the group traveled to Korea on the k-drama tour inspired by 'Winter Sonata.'"
    • Eating celebrations can be city-wide as shown in this article by Colorado Public Radio on Star Wars themed events in Denver. "The vegetarian restaurant City O’ City and its adjoining live art space Deer Pile are hosting their third annual 'May the Fourth Be With You' party. This year, Mutiny Information Cafe, 3 Kings Tavern and City Hall have joined the roster of venues participating in the interplanetary festivities, helping spread the 'Star Wars' fandom from South Broadway through Capitol Hill."
    • MomClick featured one fan who connected with actor/writer B.J. Novak through food. "Known for his role as the intern on the popular NBC sitcom 'The Office,' he was also one of the writers for the series...In honor of Novak's book...Jen's sugar cookies were shaped and decorated around a theme of one of [his] stories, 'From the story about a red shirt, a mirror the size of Earth, to a story about what happened when the tortoise rematched the hare...I tried to get as creative as possible and to add a little bit more showmanship. They were delivered in a box decorated as the book jacket.'”

    What examples of fandom and food have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Authentic fandom

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 17 May 2014 - 3:37pm
    Message type:

    • An article in Connecticut College’s The College Voice insisted that there's no room for art that isn't "original", complaining about the success of cover bands. "Wicked Peach is certainly an example of this. One sophomore said her adoration for the band was because 'they play songs I like without trying to make it their own.' The Cover Band is Pop without the music. Wicked Peach is not music; it’s entertainment. They haven’t contributed a single original note to the universe, but they can certainly get 200 hundred drunk ’90s kids into a mosh pit. In their defense, at least they’re upfront about their unoriginality. With the majority of Pop music consisting of the same four chords, most contemporary music is essentially just slight variations on what’s come before."
    • "Phony" fandom remains an issue for many Deadspin readers who took offense at a profile of soccer fans. "As insufferable as the characters in the story come off, I'd much rather have a beer with them than with anyone who tells someone else they're being a fan the wrong way. This is the 22-year-old at a punk show scoffing at the 15-year-old who probably didn't even know about the band until its major-label release...The self-important fan is convinced his fandom is a signifier of something larger than liking the sport. The self-confident fan doesn't give a shit what brings other people to the sport. Be the self-confident fan."
    • A post at io9 's Observation Deck instead asked at what point you should "turn in your fan card." "I haven't really cared since about anything 'new' related to Star Wars. Pink Five was the best thing Star Wars to come out since the extended editions (and when I say that, know that I refused to buy the extended edition on video), and of course it was fan-made. I couldn't be arsed to watch more than a bit of the Clone Wars. I haven't even clicked on the recent casting announcements. But still, if I'm flipping through channels late at night and come across A New Hope on some godforsaken channel, or if I'm suddenly in the mood and grab my DVD of The Empire Strikes Back I'm transfixed again...So, I'm definitely still a Star Wars fan. I guess. From a certain point of view."
    • This review of a My Little Pony parody concludes that fandom doesn't have to be tragic. "This is probably the hardest comic I’ve ever had to give a rating to. Much like My Little Pony itself, it’s not my cup of tea, but there’s nothing particular wrong with it. It promises a parody of bronies and fandom culture and it delivers upon that just fine. I think the moral of this story is this: Regardless of your fandom, enjoy it the way you wish to enjoy it, and let others do the same. If you absolutely feel the need to argue your opinions to other members of your fandom please do so calmly and constructively and don’t bully others for disagreeing with you."

    What fandom authenticity debates have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Pages

Subscribe to Fannish Practices