News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Every Kind of Fan

    By Janita Burgess on Tuesday, 2 September 2014 - 4:22pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews Every Kind of Fan

    • NPR reported on a K-Pop con in Los Angeles. "[T]alking demographics, Killoren says that most of the 40,000 KCON-goers are girls. Now, you might expect that most of the fans are Korean. 'Most every single person will think that. In fact, most Koreans think that. And they come and they realize we have - less than 10 percent of our audience is Korean.' And Killoren says, that's kind of the point. KCON is a way to give American K-pop fans a taste of something they usually only see on YouTube and to get them caught up in that Hallyu wave." (Transcript available).
    • Portugal News Online reported on an international Cliff Richard con. "Sandra Nicholson, from Newcastle, flew in purposely from the UK for the fundraising event, as did 57-year-old life-long fan Margrit, from Austria. Most of the fans were already well-acquainted, having bumped into each other several times before at a number of the many concerts and events that have been held over the past half a century, since Cliff Richard rocked onto the scene in the late 1950s. Dutch fan Petra de Nie, who runs the Sir Cliff Video Clips website, was also on the cruise, as was Karen Campbell, who possibly had the longest trip of all fans, having travelled with her husband from Brisbane, Australia."
    • Essential Pittsburgh hosted a discussion on "Why Pittsburgh is Geek City, USA" to explain "the start of the Comic Con cultural movement." Comics museum director Joe Wos explained that geek culture was also critical for the growth of cities. "Geek is driving the economy...so I think it's really important for a city to have the attractions, the resources, the sort of things that geeks look for when they move to a city." A caller noted that "Pittsburgh has now had three generations of science fiction clubs all started by women" and Wos added "There was just this huge movement of women who wanted to take comics to the next level." (No transcript available).
    • The Los Angeles Times discussed Outlander's appeal. "The series arrives at a time when Hollywood is acutely aware of the value of female audiences, thanks to 'The Hunger Games,' 'Twilight' and the upcoming 'Fifty Shades of Grey' — projects with passionate, built-in fan bases that have forced the industry to rethink its attitude toward so-called 'chick lit.' And even though while television is thought to be a more female-friendly medium than film, prestige drama remains a realm dominated by male antiheroes. Starz, which last year broadcast 'The White Queen,' another sexy period piece featuring a strong heroine and adapted from a popular historical novel, is specifically trying to reach out to this 'underserved audience' of female subscribers."

    What fandoms have you seen that reach around the globe? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Reconsidering Fans & Fanworks

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 30 August 2014 - 4:09pm
    Message type:

    Robot fans at a Korean baseball game

    • It's not unusual to find media articles or online posts with dubious declarations about fanworks' legal status, but it's less common to find posts that reconsider the topic. One writer for Business2Community took advice from OTW Legal staffer Heidi Tandy to better explore relevant legal cases and events. "One of the hallmarks of fan fiction is that it must be non-commercial. Yet many of the sites have ads on them – so aren’t they commercial? Not necessarily, says Tandy. 'Since 2002, there’s been a pretty clear distinction about what constitutes commercial vs. non-commercial publishing. I did a panel with Warner Brothers, and posed the question, ‘What if we put Google Ads or become an Amazon affiliate on our fan fiction site as a way to pay our server and hosting bills?’ And they said, ‘We have no problem with self-funding. What we have is a problem is with people selling things as if they are authorized or created by us or the original author.’'”
    • The Los Angeles Times posted about another recent legal case on Sherlock Holmes' public domain status which made clear the judge's views. "'The Doyle estate's business strategy is plain: charge a modest license fee for which there is no legal basis, in the hope that the 'rational' writer or publisher asked for the fee will pay it rather than incur a greater cost, in legal expenses, in challenging the legality of the demand. The strategy had worked ... only Klinger (so far as we know) resisted,' Posner wrote in his opinion. 'In effect he was a private attorney general, combating a disreputable business practice — a form of extortion — and he is seeking by the present motion not to obtain a reward but merely to avoid a loss.'"
    • TIME posted about robots replacing fans at Korean baseball games. "Hanwha’s robot fans will work as stand-ins for human fans who can’t attend a game. Remote fans will be able to control some of the robots’ movements — presumably certain hand gestures in the direction of umpires — and can even upload an image of their face to be shown on the machine’s screen. The robots will also let fans watch the game from afar, giving more fans the opportunity to join in the action and cheer on their team." Whether the robot fans will have the same legal rights as human fans remains to be seen but legal developments are sure to keep evolving!

    What tech and legal developments about fandom have caught your attention? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Terms in Use

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Friday, 29 August 2014 - 4:57pm
    Message type:

    Magnifying glass over a dictionary with text that reads OTW Fannews Terms in Use
    • As fandom has become more visible, the terms it uses have spread out into new areas. At this point various bands have written songs titled "Fan fiction" and Australian musician Geoffrey O'Connor has recently titled a whole album "Fan Fiction", while there is also a band with the same name.
    • In one of a constant stream of fanwork contests across the web, Vita.mn discussed their fanfiction entries and made some curious claims. "After weeding out the slashfic (which is to regular fan fiction what '50 Shades' is to 'Twilight')...'Second Player' tells the tale of the Mario Bros. from Luigi’s perspective — only they’re not actually brothers in this otherwise spot-on continuity nod. They’re a couple who fell in love in the days before Pride Parades and Rainbow Road Races, and had no choice but to disguise the true nature of their relationship or face the scorn of the Mushroom Kingdom. If you’re worried that this sounds like slashfic, don’t be. It’s a well-crafted original take on a beloved video-game icon and his less celebrated brother, and it traces their lives together in a way that leaves you rethinking every Mario-branded game you’ve ever button-mashed your way through. The goal of any great piece of fanfic is to enhance the original work, so read 'Second Player,' then go back and play 'Super Mario Bros.' and see if you don’t find it a little more interesting and far more tragic."
    • In an interview with IT expert Taylor Judd about password security, he discussed hacker strategies using a fandom example. "So they'll say, 'Ok it's Joe Schmoe Password123 on Battlestar Galactica fan fiction, the first thing I'm going to do when I see that is I'm going to go to gmail.com and see if that username and password works there." (No transcript available).
    • Of course, fandom is constantly inventing new terms as seen at Richard Armitage Frenzy. "Fandom forensics is when a fangirl (or fanboy) goes into detail mode to solve a mystery. What happened?! When?! Who did it?! Who was there?! Did the tie have a tie clip?! If so, whose was it?!"

    What fandom terms have you seen used (or misused)? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Working For and Against Fans

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Thursday, 21 August 2014 - 4:46pm
    Message type:

    People engaged in tug of war. Text reads OTW Fannews Working For and Against Fans
    • In February 2014, OTW Legal submitted comments to the European Commission in regards to its copyright regulations review. Now a report is out summing up the responses. "The results are not entirely surprising and very clear: we have a strong divide among copyright stakeholders with end users and institutional users (e.g. libraries, archives, universities) strongly in favor of copyright reform and authors, collective management organizations, publishers and producers in favor of the current copyright system."
    • Australia is undergoing a similar process, and is requesting comments from "interested organisations and individuals on the questions outlined in the discussion paper and on other possible approaches to address this issue." Submissions close on Monday, 1 September 2014. The Australian government is taking a very pro-copyright holder stance emphasizing levels of piracy and saying "Everyone has a role to play in reducing online copyright infringement. Rights holders need to ensure that content can be accessed easily and at a reasonable price. Internet service providers (ISPs) can take reasonable steps to ensure their systems are not used to infringe copyright. Consumers can do the right thing and access content lawfully."
    • Internet Policy Review featured a discussion of copyright in the UK and focused on gaming content. "Valve uses the Steam Workshop as a space where player-created content can be bought. The proceeds then get split between Valve and the item creator....[a fan] began distributing the shirts through a print on demand e-commerce service until Valve sent a takedown request. 'I was kind of under the impression that because Valve is so open to the community profiting - they've got the whole Workshop - I thought maybe they would encourage that sort of thing but they want people to do it through their channels.'...Wild was later contacted by We Love Fine, a third-party which works with Valve to get the company's approval for selling fan-designed products. A couple of his designs are now on the We Love Fine site and his work will also be included in the official shop catalogue for Valve's upcoming multimillion dollar Dota 2 professional gaming tournament."
    • ClickZ told marketers they need to embrace fan content. "This week it was reported that TripAdvisor has created a page for the Grand Budapest Hotel...While the page comes with a disclaimer...the devotion with which fans have thrown themselves into crafting unique user-generated content is very real. To date, more than 120 TripAdvisor users from all over the world have taken the time to review their fictional experience at the fictional hotel, peppering their posts with inside jokes only those who have seen the film would understand. The response demonstrates an interest in the movie that goes beyond the standard consumer reaction to entertainment content. In the literary world, this behavior is most closely related to fan fiction."

    What fandom copyright issues have you been seeing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Getting Along

    By Janita Burgess on Tuesday, 19 August 2014 - 4:50pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews Getting Along

    • TIME's James Poniewozik examined why different media fandoms need to play nice. "Outlander the TV series is an adaptation, which Starz–like HBO or AMC or any other adapter–is making for an audience that, ideally, will be far larger than the readership alone. Can you not have a legitimate opinion on them unless you have read the source books–and unless you love the source books and are invested in a series you haven’t yet seen? Are the old fans the true fans, the authentic fans, the authoritative fans? Can you truly appreciate and understand an adaption without reading the source–or is it actually a handicap?"
    • Upworthy pointed to a video which mocked the 'fake geek girl' syndrome by deconstructing the arguments surrounding it. [No transcript available]
    • Adelaide's The Advertiser explored women's problems in comics fandom while also featuring a variety of cosplay pics which provided a good look at the variety of female characters on display. "'We need to realise that every fan has an equal right to be a fan, no matter how much or how little they’ve seen or read.' Ms Scott is confident the enlightenment of male fans is imminent. 'I feel like I’m seeing it already...as more and more girls come through, there’s a greater sense of things being inclusive and celebratory, more light and fun and exciting...Recently I saw someone cosplaying as a Snow White-themed Boba Fett from Star Wars — and when you have a fandom doing that, it’s amazing.' Ms Adams says angry male fans have missed the point. 'Fandom is for everyone, young or old, male or female, and the attitude toward it needs to change.'"
    • The New Statesman asked if 2014 was the year of the fan. "A few months back, I saw a post on Fyeahcopyright, a tumblr about fanworks and legal issues written and edited by lawyers Heidi Tandy and Hannah Lowe...[which] posited that all of this increased attention of and respect for fans could signal 'The Year of the Fan'...A quick google search revealed that there have been a few somewhat feeble-seeming attempts at years of fans in the past – a season-long promotion for an American baseball team, or a series of South Park full of winking in-jokes – but this is more about a collective feeling, some positive momentum, something that’s been gathering steam at an exponential rate recently."

    What do you feel needs celebrating in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Enduring Effects

    By Janita Burgess on Sunday, 17 August 2014 - 5:05pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews Enduring Effects

    • An Autostraddle post explored the influence of femslash. "I didn’t find femslash until I was 17. I can’t remember the exactly when but I do remember the exactly what: Ginny Weasley and Pansy Parkinson. I noticed that Ginny seemed a lot happier and more alive with Pansy than she ever did with Harry, kind of like how teenage me was noticing that I hated being around boys but was positively radiant in a girl’s presence. You can actually track the evolution of my sexuality with the fanfiction I read and wrote: the more comfortable I became with my hugely gay life, the more hugely gay my bookshelf was, fanfiction included."
    • The Week used tattoos to examine fandom. "As diverse as these tattoos are, they’re all rooted in the same thing: the powerful, deeply personal impact that mass culture can have on our private lives. Tattoos based on fandoms are rarely a simple tribute to the movies or TV shows we love; they’re muses, reminders of a friend, acts of rebellion, testaments to survival. Tattoos may begin with a fandom — but they end with the self."
    • The Celebrity Cafe claimed that Harry Potter fandom will endure. "Ever since Harry Potter 'ended' in 2007, the world has wondered what would happen after. Will the fandom die out? Will the magical world cease to exist? Ultimately, what happens when there are no more books and no more movies? Nothing. Nothing happened. We are alive and thriving just as we were back in 2007. Children are still discovering the stories; movie marathons courtesy of ABC Family are still rampant; and now we have a theme park. We are doing pretty decently if I say so myself. Naturally there have been losses as Mugglenet, one of the top Potter fan sites, did experience a 50 percent drop in viewership since the last film came out and the books have yet to crack a best-sellers list in years but that is no reason to assume the fandom is dissolving."

    What has always stuck with you about fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Cons, Cons, Cons

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 15 August 2014 - 6:12pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Robyn with the post title over a blurred photos of fans at a convention

    • As many cons are opening their doors this month, SDCC continues to draw a lot of media attention. Vox wrote about its evolution. "Please understand: I don't think anyone is wrong to love Hall H...But when the only pursuit our films have is awesomeness, and humanity is leeched out of so many of them, it's not hard to look at all of the marketing here and wonder whether it's time to stop asking for the 90th iteration of the same old thing and, instead, hope for something new...There's a beauty and purity to the expression of love that is fandom, but Hollywood has figured out a little too well how to channel that in events like Comic-Con. We are invited, over and over again, to keep paying homage at the same temples, to the same gods. We celebrate, and we celebrate, and we celebrate, but we forget all too often to create."
    • Early fanzine publisher Maggie Thompson spoke about cons and comics. "You get people who just huff and huff, but there are more comics dealers today, certainly, than there were in 1976! And the people putting on the convention have always made an effort to promote the comic books that are part of that outreach. At the Eisner Awards, I heard people commenting bitterly, ‘Ooh, they’ve got all these celebrities, the comics people aren’t good enough.' And I’m going, you know what? These guys are fans too! Samuel L. Jackson’s a comic book fan. Jonathan Ross is a London celebrity host of a talk show, but that doesn’t mean he’s not a fan. And it’s one of the things that I love, because it’s the common love that brings us all together. "
    • NPR's Monkey See blog discussed SDCC and anxiety. "And the first thing I learned — confirmed for myself, really — is that Comic-Con is much, much less weird than a lot of people who don't attend it make it out to be. I encountered so many contemptuous tweets about it in absentia, so many assumptions that this was, at best, some kind of Weirdo Dude Ranch where, for once, freaks have the opportunity to be among their own. And I'm not saying there's none of that, particularly if among freaks and weirdos you count those who would wryly attach that label to themselves. It is, quite clearly, a haven. But I dare you to watch and conclude that the extreme football fan tailgaters profiled therein — who tend to be tagged as extreme in their enthusiasms but not socially derided — are less weird than the people of Comic-Con."
    • The L.A. Times saw MTV's fandom awards at SDCC as the next step in marketing. "Despite all of its efforts, it's unclear whether Hollywood will ever figure out how to harness fan enthusiasm — be it through social media, Comic-Con, or any other avenues — in a way that consistently translates into profits. 'Veronica Mars' fans may have brought the long-canceled show to the big screen with their Kickstarter donations, but, despite all the talk of the revolutionary power of crowd-funding, the movie ultimately proved a box office dud, grossing just over $3 million. As former Variety editor-in-chief Peter Bart wrote last week on Deadline.com, 'One studio chief told me recently that all social marketing represents is a road map for spending less money while still failing to find an audience.'"

    What are your favorite cons? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Studying Fandom

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Wednesday, 13 August 2014 - 4:54pm
    Message type:

    Person looking through microscope with text reading OTW Fannews Studying Fandom
    • The International Business Times was one of many outlets that wrote about a college course on Game of Thrones. "The students also take turns to lead classroom discussions, which touch on diverse topics including racialism, fanfiction, gender roles and power, identity formation, incest, cultural allegory and, of course, good, evil and the grey area in between. For their final assignment, students will create their own addition to the Game of Thrones saga."
    • A PhD candidate created a website to share her research on fanfiction and is looking for comments. "The Fandom Then/Now project presents research conducted in 2008 and uses it to facilitate conversations about fan fiction's past and future. What do you notice in the data from 2008? What do you think about the intersections between fan fiction and romantic storytelling? Now, in 2014, what has and hasn't changed about fans' reading and writing practices?"
    • The Washington Post wanted to know why female fans scream. "'When men cry at a sports event, it’s very similar' to the screaming that takes place at a One Direction concert, says author Rachel Simmons. 'It wouldn’t be okay for men to do that anywhere else. But the sporting event sanctions that behavior.' Simmons is the author of 'The Curse of the Good Girl,' a book in which she argues that young women are unfairly asked to squeeze into an impossible mold of politeness and modesty. Simmons says a concert is a unique event that gives girls the rare opportunity to break out of those roles. 'In their day-to-day, non-concert-going lives, girls don’t have a lot of permission to scream,' she says. 'A concert offers an oasis from the daily rules about being good girls. Screaming is about letting go and leaving the confines of being the self-conscious pleaser.'"
    • Comics Beat cited a recent study which showed that younger congoers are evenly split between males and females, with a skew toward men among older congoers. "I can’t wait to see the comments talking about how this survey isn’t as valid as something some comcis publishers did 40 years ago, or these fans don’t actually BUY things or they don’t really READ comics and blah blah blah. The truth is: the world is changing and this time it’s for the better." Indeed, for yet another year different media outlets continue to rediscover that fans aren't all male.

    What fandom studies have grabbed you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Enabled

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Saturday, 9 August 2014 - 5:19pm
    Message type:

    Industrial machinery with text that reads Fandom Enabled OTW Fannews
    • At Aeon Michelle Nijhuis discusses genderswapping with her daughter. "When I first wrote about my daughter’s Hobbit genderswap, many people said that fanfiction writers were way ahead of us, and so they were: Female Bilbo is a familiar fanfic character. My daughter isn’t the first reader who’s wondered what would happen if a girl stepped into Tolkien’s wonderful, timeless story, and I hope she’s far from the last."
    • Public Knowledge noted that Hasbro is now offering the option of fan-made merchandise through 3-D printing. "Many of these types of fan works are likely protected by fair use. But creating and selling My Little Pony figurines is something that, at a minimum, Hasbro could have tied up in lawsuits for years. To its credit, Hasbro decided not to sue this community of super fans. Instead, they found a way to give them a license to create and profit from their creations. Creators on SuperFanArt can now confidently sell fully licensed versions of their works. The community gets the ability to thrive, Hasbro gets to build good will (and, presumably, a cut of sales), and no one gets sued."
    • NBC News also suggested that 3-D printing might revolutionize the toy industry. "These fan creations are enthusiastically shared on the Internet, kind of like fan fiction, in which people write their own versions of stories that they love. These designs are going to circulate anyway, Liverman said, so companies might as well offer them alongside their own and encourage people to interact with their brand....Charles Mire, founder of Structur3d Printing in Ontario, likens the trend to 'cosplay,' where people dress up like their favorite characters."
    • A The New Yorker featured the reason why The Sims became the first game to represent LGBT experiences, and how this was crucial to its success. "During The Sims’s protracted development, the team had debated whether to permit same-sex relationships in the game. If this digital petri dish was to accurately model all aspects of human life, from work to play and love, it was natural that it would facilitate gay relationships." Instead, "[t]he controversy came this year, when Nintendo released, in the West, its Sims-esque video game Tomodachi Life, a game in which same-sex relationships are forbidden. Characters in Tomodachi Life can bicker, flirt, fall in love, marry, and move in together. But, for many gay people, the game’s denial of same-sex relationships reflected real-world systems that had been built to deny their lifestyle and their biology."

    What fandom-made events or works are your favorites? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The Fannish Perspective

    By Janita Burgess on Thursday, 7 August 2014 - 4:50pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews The Fannish Perspective

    • Many theater productions revolve around fannish topics or themes. As a review of Miss Emma’s Matchmaking Agency for Literary Characters dubbed it, the play "is staged fan fiction, imagining how the likes of Dorian Gray (Nick Martin), Jane Eyre (Sage Tanguay) and Philip Marlowe (Caleb Erikson) might interact if they jumped off the page."
    • The Escapist featured Pokemon crossover fanart. "Emery posts her art on a Tumblr account called Attack on Pokemon, and she posts sketches on a separate blog. Her art can be purchased as prints through DeviantArt. The opening line of the first opening theme song for Attack on Titan says, 'They're the prey, and we are the hunters.' In a way, Pokemon are the prey for trainers hoping to capture at least one of every species or attack them for experience. Now imagine them all as titans; no more 10-year-olds on innocent adventures."
    • At Jezebel, Mark Shrayber cited Fanlore and AO3 in explaining 'knotting' to readers. "Of course knotting isn't as visceral in the same way something like extreme pornography may be due to the fact that it's not only fictional but also (technically) impossible. But fiction of this nature is also becoming a mainstream staple of internet culture, which always bears discussion. Today it's a panel at a failed convention; tomorrow it might be the subject of a semester-long university course."
    • The Roanoke Times profiled a small hometown fan-con. "Just about a dozen people paid the $35 entrance fee this year, causing Hubert to question the future of the event. If she does it next year, she said it will probably just be a party in her house...'I’m trying to help other people get over their fear like I used to be afraid to tell people what I do,' Hubert said. 'So it’s kind of like trying to get people to come out from behind their computer and come out of their shell a little bit so they don’t feel like they’re alone. We’re all just as geeky and introverted as the other person and it’s OK for us come together every once in a while. Especially if it’s just once a year, we can handle that.'”

    Where have you come across a fannish perspective? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Pages

Subscribe to News of Note