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OTW Legal’s International Advocacy and You!

OTW Legal has been busy working on three advocacy projects around the world–in Canada, Australia, and the European Union. We want to thank you for your help in Canada, and let you know what’s happening and what you can do to help in Australia and the European Union.

Canada

Thanks to the many amazing stories we received from Canadian fans, we submitted a comment to the Canadian Parliament’s copyright law review about the power and benefit of laws that allow and promote transformative works. You can find our submission here. (more…)

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Are you Canadian? OTW Legal Wants Your Stories!

Are you Canadian? OTW Legal wants your stories about being a fan!

Over the years, OTW Legal has spoken for fans and fanwork creators in comments to governments around the world including the U.S., the E.U., Canada, Australia, and South Africa. And we want your help to keep doing that! The Canadian government is currently conducting a review of the Canadian Copyright Act. The Parliamentary Committee responsible for the review has already received some comments complaining about fan-friendly laws like the 2012 expansions to fair dealing and the User-Generated Content exception to copyright infringement. OTW Legal wants to show Parliament the other side of the story: the important value that Canadian fanwork creators get from being able to create transformative works.

Are you Canadian and have you expressed yourself, gained skills, been part of creative communities, or otherwise experienced the benefits of being able to create transformative works–works that are legal to create in Canada because of fair dealing and the UGC exception? If so, OTW Legal would love to hear your stories. We need to submit our comments soon, so please send our Legal Advocacy team your stories about how being able to create fanworks and belong to fan communities has helped you, by the end of May. (Feel free to use a pseudonym if you don’t want us to share your personally identifying information.) We’ll use your stories to support our legal advocacy work in Canada and worldwide.

Thanks!

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Phishing and Domain Names

A few months ago, we learned that someone had registered the domain name archiveofourowno.com and copied the front page of Archive Of Our Own at that url; they even included a login screen that mimicked the AO3 login.

We immediately went to GoDaddy–the registrar of the domain name–and asked them to remove the website, because it violated their bar on phishing (that is, tricking someone into giving away login or other personal information). GoDaddy’s Terms state that they will not allow a site to impersonate “a legitimate, trustworthy site” by tricking “visitors into providing them sensitive information like logins.” However, GoDaddy never responded and did not take the site down.

Therefore, in January, the OTW Legal Committee initiated a proceeding with the World Intellectual Property Office with the goal of stripping the domain name from the infringers. In April, after the infringers had failed to respond, the WIPO Panel ruled in our favor. The panel held that Bradley Binkley of Chicago, who had registered the domain name, had “in all likelihood… registered the disputed domain name with the aim of exploiting and profiting from the Complainant’s mark, through the impersonation of the Complainant in furtherance of a fraudulent phishing scheme.” As a result, the panel voided Binkley’s registration of the name, and the OTW is currently in the process of setting up the domain name to point to the main Archive of Our Own page. (more…)